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Old Jan 24, 2012, 4:58 PM   #1
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Default What do we think of this? :)

This was taken with the kit lense the 55=250mm @ 100 ISO. I find the pic I took yesterday of the swan with the new lense 50mm EF 1.8 gives alot more sharpness. So, anyway any thoughts on this one? I appreciate the feedback
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Old Jan 24, 2012, 5:29 PM   #2
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The picture and the crop is nice. But the swan is out of focus / not to sharp. And that kinda kills the picture a little bit.. But just keep practicing, and shooting. Wild-life photography takes some practice, and a bit of luck
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Old Jan 24, 2012, 6:01 PM   #3
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Hi- the image appears soft- no doubt due to the shutter speed- 160th sec in this instance.
You'll need at least 1/400th sec shutter speed for a fidgeting bird.
If you'd have chosen iso 400 here as opposed to iso 100,you'd have probably been in the desired range of shutter speed,resulting in a sharper shot.
As you were using the 55-250mm lens- and presumably at the long end of it- you cannot open up the aperture more than f/5.6(used here)- therefore you cannot get enough light in required for a fast shutter speed with correct exposure. The way to get round this,is by increasing the sensitivity(iso setting).
So in essence- keep an eye on your shutter speeds when shooting fidgety subjects- if you've not got enough- kick up the iso setting...
Bear in mind also- if using auto or program- the camera doesn't know what your shooting and even increasing iso settings might make the camera step the aperture down- only concerned with correct exposure- not a flapping Swan.
So- for fidgeting subjects,use aperture/shutter priority or full manual- and if you can't get enough speed(with a correct exposure)- kick up the iso setting...

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Old Jan 24, 2012, 6:44 PM   #4
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Yea I felt the same way it isn't sharp and focused enough. I didn't know that info when the lense is being used that way. So, you don't think if I were to use the other lense the clarity would be better even when using the 100ISO?

Thanks, this was helpful. Yes that was one fidgety bird. I think he's getting kinda done with me by now lol. I'm there everyday
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Old Jan 24, 2012, 10:50 PM   #5
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What focusing mode are you using?

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Old Jan 25, 2012, 4:44 AM   #6
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Jenna- either lens you use will produce acceptably sharp results at iso 100- providing you've got enough shutter speed to play with for a moving subject- in the case of this Swan pic- 1/160th isn't fast enough,plus you might get camera shake at this speed if you're shooting hand-held at longer focal lengths.
As mentioned- if at a given aperture setting(lowest "f" number would be ideal here) you can't get enough shutter speed(for correct exposure)- push up the iso setting to compensate.
Centre area focusing would be ideal in this instance also.

Simply put- the iso setting doesn't increase sharpness per-se,but it allows faster shutter speeds to be used due to increasing the sensors sensitivity to light- thus lessening the chance of camera shake and subject blur/movement associated with slower shutter speeds.

Last edited by SIMON40; Jan 25, 2012 at 4:48 AM.
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Old Jan 25, 2012, 8:26 AM   #7
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ok that makes sense, thank you. I am going to do it again, yet I do like the new lense alot better. I've even taken pics at home with it, portrais with the new Nissan flash I bought and the difference is def. noticable. Yet i see your point with this. I appreciate it. I am shotting hand held, because lugging the tripod is rough all the time. I battle my own shakiness as well when shooting. I have MS so my hand trembles on occassion, and I dont' really notice it till I download pics into pc and look @ them.

It's hard too when you are working with animals, because you can have the camera set than if they do begin to move you have to change the ISO quickly to capture. make sense?
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Old Jan 25, 2012, 10:43 AM   #8
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The faster the shutter speed the more it will help with shakiness. It might be worth upping the ISO to get a faster shutter speed.

What focusing mode are you using? You want to use a single-point focus mode so that you can place your point of focus on the most important part of the picture (most often the eyes). Don't let the camera choose the focus point.

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Old Jan 25, 2012, 11:09 AM   #9
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Jenna- you can leave the iso fairly high- say iso 800/1600- and if you're in say,shutter priority and set 1/400th sec- if too much light comes in,the camera will step the aperture down immediately for you- leaving you with the desired speed AND correct exposure...
Obviously the lower iso you can get away with the better(to reduce noise)- but not at the expense of shutter speed....
I generally tend to use aperture priority for moving subjects- and shoot wide open(lowest "f" number) with centre area focus- much like a target shooter.
I would also take a couple of random test shots to see what kind of speed the lighting conditions would give me- and if I didn't have enough- then up the iso....
If the clouds suddenly parted and suddenly became brighter,the camera will automatically step up the shutter speed to compensate(for correct exposure)- and the more speed the better.. all of which leaves you to shoot away happily...

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Old Jan 25, 2012, 11:17 AM   #10
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Just an example....
Aperture priority 1/640th sec,f/6.3 at iso 800
Note the use of f/6.3- the widest aperture I could use at 270mm on the Tamron 18-270 lens...
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