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Old Apr 12, 2012, 5:53 PM   #11
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Originally Posted by sdromel View Post
I like the overall texture achieved. Sort of cloth or parchment like. Perhaps a kind of Mediterranean look.

Quite interesting.
Or the drapes the wife bought and never used. They are much heavier than standard backgrounds but cheaper than buying a new background for now.
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Old Apr 14, 2012, 12:37 AM   #12
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How the background looking now?
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Old Apr 14, 2012, 1:23 PM   #13
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Here's a rendition cutting the glare using brushes.
(Keeps the parchment or canvas look.)
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Old Apr 14, 2012, 1:39 PM   #14
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yes that sorts it the model becomes the focus now
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Old Apr 14, 2012, 8:10 PM   #15
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Here's a rendition cutting the glare using brushes.
(Keeps the parchment or canvas look.)
How did you get the glare out? I can think of a number of pictures I would like to get rid of glare but don't know how it's done.
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Old Apr 14, 2012, 9:56 PM   #16
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There are all kinds of techniques such as use of burn tool, clone stamp, healing brush and standard brushes and eye dropper for color selection. You can even use the "magic wand" to select just the glare portions and collectively darken them.

I was pretty lazy and just used the eye dropper to sample the wood color, then use a suitable brush (50% opacity) to color stroke out the glare portions. (You can do that pretty quick/effortless.) There was a question about about how much shine versus dullness to use for the wood. Since one of the comments was to maybe use some defocus/apply some de-emphasis, I decided go with a matted look which also seemed to go well with the sofa's cloth texture and worked well with increasing contrast (detail sharpness sense) between wood head board and model (appeared to help model stand out better - personal judgment call). You can easily redo the PIX for a shiny-er finish, but all these things are, of course, judgment calls.

Actually, this is a good example to practice using some of the classic PS/PE tools. On the submitted PIX, some color blending is still needed to help eliminate visible brush strokes. A possibility is to try the smudge tool at around 50% with a suitable brush size.

In this rendition, I let the sofa headboard be more natural (glossy) to the original .

Some References:
http://www.essential-photoshop-eleme...flections.html
http://www.essential-photoshop-eleme...ove-glare.html
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Last edited by sdromel; Apr 14, 2012 at 11:33 PM. Reason: Add Photo Rendition
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Old Apr 15, 2012, 12:04 AM   #17
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sdromel,
Thanks for the tip and links on how to remove the shine, it's going to be a big help.

Thanks again,
Craig
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Old Apr 15, 2012, 3:16 PM   #18
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i was reading a book tonight the complete photographer by tom ang and they had a picture there with a model and sofa wooden top but very little glare. it looks like the way they have there lights setup if thats any use
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Old Apr 15, 2012, 9:47 PM   #19
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Next time I just won't dust the sofa off before the shoot, that way the dust will help stop the glare.
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Old Apr 19, 2012, 11:29 AM   #20
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I wonder if applying baby powder will reduce the reflection?
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