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Old May 5, 2013, 6:07 PM   #1
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Default Boots on the Ground

I'm trying to improve my stitching abilities. I've been using Image Composite Editor to combine them then move into Lightroom to finish processing.

Here's a 32-shot stitch - you can click on it to see a much higher resolution. Thoughts? Advice? Hate it???

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Old May 5, 2013, 10:29 PM   #2
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I like the shot very much. As a former military guy, I appreciate the phrase "Boots on the ground". But what is the process/reason for stitching 32 images? I'm not familiar with the process.
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Old May 6, 2013, 12:40 PM   #3
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Nice picture. Really, 32 photos stitch together, I never would have guessed, good job. Your PP added blur to the foreground is off a little, the blur doesn't match the background blur and you missed some area on the right side where the road drops off into the bushes. Really, 32 photos stitch together, I have to say you have that part down pat.
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Old May 6, 2013, 4:02 PM   #4
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I don't think the bokeh is added in post though I could be wrong. That's part of the purpose of stitching photos like this. When you choose one focus point and use the lowest possible aperture and then shoot a bunch of shots and combine them it naturally gives the bokeh effect of using a medium format camera. It's often used on portraits as well and a lot of people refer to that method of portraiture as "the Brenizer method" because it was popularized by Ryan Brenizer.

I've done some myself. It's a nice effect sometimes.

brad
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Old May 6, 2013, 7:00 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hawgwild View Post
As a former military guy, I appreciate the phrase "Boots on the ground". But what is the process/reason for stitching 32 images? I'm not familiar with the process.
I too am a former military guy...those were my last pair of boots and I wore them to my retirement ceremony (fatigues instead of formal).


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Originally Posted by DigMe View Post
I don't think the bokeh is added in post though I could be wrong. That's part of the purpose of stitching photos like this. When you choose one focus point and use the lowest possible aperture and then shoot a bunch of shots and combine them it naturally gives the bokeh effect of using a medium format camera. It's often used on portraits as well and a lot of people refer to that method of portraiture as "the Brenizer method" because it was popularized by Ryan Brenizer.

I've done some myself. It's a nice effect sometimes.

brad
Exactly as Brad said. The only post work was cropping, slight sharpening, and a slight bit of saturation added. The bokeh is all in the original shots that were combined for the final image. My 6D was on the smallest resolution available and mated it with an EF 300/4 (borrowed from a friend) to get better separation. I used Microsoft ICE to do the stitching, then did a little post work in LR3.6 before loading it online. Even using the smallest resolution, the final image before cropping was about 45mb. I cropped it quite severely to get it to the shape I wanted.

Last edited by Quadna71; May 6, 2013 at 7:02 PM. Reason: Better PP clarification
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Old May 7, 2013, 8:32 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Quadna71 View Post

Exactly as Brad said. The only post work was cropping, slight sharpening, and a slight bit of saturation added. The bokeh is all in the original shots that were combined for the final image. My 6D was on the smallest resolution available and mated it with an EF 300/4 (borrowed from a friend) to get better separation. I used Microsoft ICE to do the stitching, then did a little post work in LR3.6 before loading it online. Even using the smallest resolution, the final image before cropping was about 45mb. I cropped it quite severely to get it to the shape I wanted.
Thanks for the explanation, I learn something new everyday.
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Old May 7, 2013, 9:11 AM   #7
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Here are some great portraits using the Brenizer method - not the Leon Pannetta portrait but many of the ones after that. Hurd typically uses just 3 shots stitched.

http://www.samhurdphotography.com/mi...epic-portraits


quadna - I've found that I typically don't need so many shots to get the effect and it saves time in the stitching processing to use fewer.

brad
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Old May 9, 2013, 4:16 PM   #8
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Thanks, Brad. I did in fact need that many shots as it was taken with the 300mm from a fairly close distance. That computes to a very small footprint that was roughly 7 shots wide from left to right. I can appreciate the brevity of less shots, but it was the only way for the effect I wanted in that shot.

As far as speed goes, I agree that less would help out in the field as I wouldn't have to sit and patiently ensure I get full coverage. From a processing perspective, 32gb of RAM goes a long ways towards speeding things up
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Old May 14, 2013, 5:42 AM   #9
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hmmm, certainly impressive stiching 32 images, but the subject matter is somewhat lost on me and doesnt jump out at me as someting of interest. Technically its great, nice DOF, nice exposure, but empty boots on a forrest trail, im not sure what that conveys or what story its trying to tell and to me it ends up just being empty boots on a forrest trail.

If the image was something i could appreciate id still say the boots are too small in the frame IMO. as its prob a super high res image id do a bit of a crop to make the boots bigger in the image
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Old May 19, 2013, 3:41 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by schmintan View Post
hmmm, certainly impressive stiching 32 images, but the subject matter is somewhat lost on me and doesnt jump out at me as someting of interest. Technically its great, nice DOF, nice exposure, but empty boots on a forrest trail, im not sure what that conveys or what story its trying to tell and to me it ends up just being empty boots on a forrest trail.

If the image was something i could appreciate id still say the boots are too small in the frame IMO. as its prob a super high res image id do a bit of a crop to make the boots bigger in the image
Thanks for the critique! The empty boots were a metaphor to how the definition of "boots on the ground" had changed for me in the past couple of years. Traditionally, it is a military term that means we are physically located at a forward operating location. Meaning we have people on site opposed to just getting intel about a location. Since retiring from the military two years ago, the phrase has taken on a more personal reason meaning that I'm more grounded, home for my family, and can take time for myself instead of 24/7 for my country. So, Boots on the Ground has gone full circle for me...not to mention they were the last combat boots I ever wore and had them on during my retirement ceremony

I agree with the cropping comment. I struggled with how much to crop it. As it stands, it's only cropped enough to allow for smooth edges after the stitching was complete as it often leaves missing areas and jagged edges. Once that was finished off, I didn't know if I should crop it or leave as is since the whole point of this style is to have a very clear focal object surrounded by lots of OOF areas. Now that I've made the point about the Brenizer method, maybe I will go ahead and try cropping it a little more effectively and see how it turns out.

Thanks again for taking the time to comment - I appreciate it
Chris
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