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Old Aug 13, 2013, 9:14 AM   #11
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Originally Posted by vvcarpio View Post
If you're photoshopping, you can also try reducing the cyan cast in Hue/Saturation. This will make the water appear whiter.

Regarding slow/fast shutter speed, I wonder if Photoshop's motion blur filter will work as a last resort. I'm guessing probably not. I'd say slow shutter speed and tripod as the others suggested is the way to go.
IF I have to photoshop a picture to get what I want, WHY bother taking a picture in the first place, when I can digitally create it.. Which I can't cause I suck at PS..

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All seriousness aside, I hope I can convince you to like tripods. If you think about it, all you really need is a stable surface to prop your camera on. Any tabletop will do. But I find it more convenient especially during long hikes to carry a tripod than a table.

I really like Monopods. Tripods are bulky and clumsy, I want to be able to just pull out my camera, and unfold the one leg, instead of looking for a flat piece of ground, to make sure my tripod is stable..

Chances of convincing me that a tri is better than a mono, probably not in this life time.
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Old Aug 13, 2013, 10:45 AM   #12
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Chances of convincing me that a tri is better than a mono, probably not in this life time.
All you have to do is use your own photos to judge. See how your 1/2 second or full second exposures come out.

But, you also work under a misconception that you need completely level ground for a tripod - you don't. each leg can be adjusted to a different height and on a half-way decent tripod you can change the angle of the legs independently as well.
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Old Aug 13, 2013, 4:54 PM   #13
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I have 2 tripods ones a manfrotto 190x and yes its heavy and bulky and I hate lugging it around, then I saw this carbon fibre tripod on ebay, a manfrotto 732CY
I think its actually for video cameras but it wasn't much money so I thought id give it a go, well it holds my Nikon D90 a treat, its small and light and so much easier to carry than my big one.
maybe you need something like that?
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Old Aug 13, 2013, 9:40 PM   #14
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-> A 3-legged monopod would require a level ground!

Also the monopod would sway with any light wind, and VERY easy to tip over... I have 2 monopods (1 carbon) and 3 tripods (different size and weight). A monopod will work best to support long and heavy telephotos, but for any serious landscape work a tripod is a must. 1/2 seconds may and will work with a monopod, but for longer shutter speeds in the tens of seconds (or minutes) there's no other way!
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Old Aug 13, 2013, 11:55 PM   #15
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All you have to do is use your own photos to judge. See how your 1/2 second or full second exposures come out.

But, you also work under a misconception that you need completely level ground for a tripod - you don't. each leg can be adjusted to a different height and on a half-way decent tripod you can change the angle of the legs independently as well.

I havent quite figured out how to change the exposure time on my Fuji yet.. WHEN I do, I'll let you know :P
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Old Aug 29, 2013, 11:27 AM   #16
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While you need a slow shutter speed, it really depends on how fast the water is flowing and how long the drop is (the length of the flow) to determine the correct speed. For short to mid sized Id say 1/4 to 1/2 a second is fine to give a nice silky look to the water. If the waterfall is longer then maybe a second or a second and a quarter is fine. Remember when the shutter is open 1/4 to 1/2 second is a long time and water can fall quite a distance.
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