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Old Aug 6, 2013, 2:05 AM   #1
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Default groan... Still not getting good waterfalls

HS20 manual Mode

F-Stop F2.8, exposure 1/110, ISO 400, Aperture 3, Focal Length 3mm


F-Stop F2.8 Exposure 1/100, ISO 100, Aperture 4, Focal Length 4mm
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Old Aug 6, 2013, 9:11 AM   #2
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You need a slower shutter speed. Do you have a tripod? Tripods are greatly beneficial for this type of shot. You also have to be careful of the highlights in the water being blown out too much. Finally, I'm not a huge fan of the fall being so much in the center of the frame.

In truth, many waterfall images are very high dynamic range. You don't want to blow water highlights too much but you want some detail in the rocks in shadow. We have some members that are excellent at water photography. Hopefully they can jump in to give you some suggestions on HDR-type techniques that work well with waterfalls. But you definitely need a slower shutter speed.
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Old Aug 6, 2013, 3:37 PM   #3
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Amen on John G's recommendation for a slower shutter speed and tripod. I find about 1 sec exposure gives a nice flow without making it too silky. I have used a ND filter to allow increasing the shutter speed. Using a polarizng filter will also allow use of a slower shutter speed as well as provide for some extra depth in color. I've not done any HDR with waterfall shots...guess I've been lucky to photograph falls from vantage points where there is good illumination across the scene. Earlier in the mornings (before 11:00 AM) have worked best for me when the sun is lower in the sky and the light can reach into all of the areas sorrounding the falls which are usually sheltered by trees.

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Old Aug 6, 2013, 5:40 PM   #4
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JohnG and Wingman are both correct as nature photography requires a totally different technique from high-speed still image:

I know how people hated this, but a tripod is a must:
One of my good friend shot a mountain range with an exposure time of 3 minutes and I was astonished by the resulting picture because it's so good with a silky sky!!!
-> Ditto in this case for waterfall, you'll need a much slower shutter speed than 1/100 to smooth out the flowing water. 1/10 second or less will be required depending on the effect you're after... First start by increasing the aperture to the max (i.e go opposite end from f/2.8) to decrease the shutter speed, and if you can't lower the camera ISO any further then use a Neutral Density (ND) filter to decrease the incoming light.

FYI: http://www.digital-photo-secrets.com...use-every-day/

To decrease the dynamic range, try to shoot the images at sunrise, sunset or overcast day. Shooting during sunshine/midday has its advantage though, in maintaining the white balance, but then you'll have to resort on multiple shots brackets to stack them back in HDR...
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Last edited by NHL; Aug 6, 2013 at 5:50 PM.
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Old Aug 7, 2013, 12:36 AM   #5
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Thanks... I'll have to experiment some more when I have a few more days off
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Old Aug 8, 2013, 11:22 AM   #6
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I think the easiest way is to set ya camera to aperture priority, and ya iso to 100 and use a tripod, then increase your F stop until your shutter speed is around 1 sec
take a pic and if the waters to silky lower the F stop number a notch and this will speed up the shutter speed and capture less water movement, if the water is not silky enough raise the F stop for a slower shutter speed.
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Old Aug 8, 2013, 8:28 PM   #7
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I use a Monopod, I hate tripods, they're clunky & clumsy, I leave my monopod attached to my camera all the time.

I would love to find a monopod, with a tripod foot attachment.
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Old Aug 9, 2013, 7:00 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pantharen View Post
I use a Monopod, I hate tripods, they're clunky & clumsy, I leave my monopod attached to my camera all the time.

I would love to find a monopod, with a tripod foot attachment.
Try this: http://www.bhphotovideo.com/bnh/cont...G&Q=&A=details

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Old Aug 9, 2013, 2:17 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wingman View Post
Dude, that is awesome.. Thanks :-)
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Old Aug 13, 2013, 9:23 AM   #10
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If you're photoshopping, you can also try reducing the cyan cast in Hue/Saturation. This will make the water appear whiter.

Regarding slow/fast shutter speed, I wonder if Photoshop's motion blur filter will work as a last resort. I'm guessing probably not. I'd say slow shutter speed and tripod as the others suggested is the way to go.

All seriousness aside, I hope I can convince you to like tripods. If you think about it, all you really need is a stable surface to prop your camera on. Any tabletop will do. But I find it more convenient especially during long hikes to carry a tripod than a table.

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