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Old Nov 7, 2015, 5:37 PM   #1
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Default milky way (kind of)

my first attempt on astro photography
it seems that the milky way is just visible here in europe on the summer..

only got this. how bad?
any hints for a next attempt?

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Old Nov 8, 2015, 7:54 PM   #2
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Hi,
It's not that your image is bad, it just doesn't have any compelling points of interest that would draw a viewer into your image. Remember, a good photograph always has a story to tell.
Suggestions;
1 go to google images and run a search entitled night astro photography.
You'll find a wealth of examples . You'll see basically 2 different subsets;
1 group will have been taken with a wide angle lens. Usually a 14mm lens set to manual focus. These images usually have some landscape scene to anchor the shot and give the viewer some perspective. Perhaps a lighthouse, mountain, or other feature.
The other group is truly astro photography. where-in the subject is a meteor, constellation or milky way, etc.

Choose the group you would like to gain more information, then go to youtube.com and run a search for tutorials that would help you.

good luck.
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Old Nov 9, 2015, 7:59 AM   #3
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Good suggestions from Zig. A few more:

a. You need to get to an area with no light pollution.
b. Use a high ISO
c. Use a fast aperture (f/2.8 or faster)
d. Use a wide angle lens
d. Expose for no more than 30 seconds in order to avoid blur caused by the earth's rotation. You could do loner if you have a tracking motor on your tripod.

Here's an attempt I made last year at Joshua Tree National Park in California. 3200 ISO at 25 secs with a f2.8 Fish eye lens.

Jehan

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Old Nov 14, 2015, 4:00 PM   #4
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thank you for your comments

this photo was made with the tamron 28-75 f/2.8
the other two lenses i have suitable for this are the 18-55 II or the 10-18 and they are both to dark

iso was about 3200 on the 700d, and yes i was away from the light pollution

i was having problems with the exposure time. above the 13sec it started to get some motion so i went to about 8/10sec

i made this photo at 7pm (it gets dark real early this time of the year)
should i go later? should i wait for the summer?

thank you
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Old Nov 14, 2015, 8:24 PM   #5
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I don't believe that you will capture enough "light" from the MW at 8-10 secs at ISO 3200. From what I can tell, there seems to be too much ambient light in the sky to make the MW stand out. Where I was located was 3 hours from a big city (Los Angeles, California). To the naked eye the MW looked very bright in the sky. If I recall, it was about 3 hours after sunset. Therefore, capturing it on a photograph was not too difficult. If the MW does not appear bright to the naked eye, then there is too much light pollution in the area.

I would try the 30 second exposure and keep the focal lens at 28mm. At the widest angle, appearance of any motion in the stars ought to be minimzed.

Another technique that I have read about (but not tried) is to take multiple 10-15 second exposures and stack them using a photo editing program.

Jehan
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Old Nov 15, 2015, 4:31 PM   #6
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i guess i have to try again in the future
thank you for the help
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Old Nov 18, 2015, 7:03 AM   #7
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Take a look at this tutorial regarding shooting at night.
The author does a good job of breaking down the steps necessary and the reasons why:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bub6ege1Qas
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Old Nov 20, 2015, 8:05 AM   #8
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will watch for sure
thank you
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