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Old Mar 4, 2005, 12:47 AM   #1
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If anyone needs the lighting or post details, please do not hesitate to ask.


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Old Mar 4, 2005, 2:20 AM   #2
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Studio lighting is ok, again pleasant to look at, but nothing stunning or remarkable here. More than adequate portrait, of course, but I suppose for all the masterful critique you bestow, (not to overlook the condescending insults to my model) I was hoping for a masterpiece. The work looks like "studio work" which is not to say as such there is no appeal at all. It lacks the spontaneity I would expect from a master such as yourself. Passing marks for studio work, and IMHO the lighting works. Have you ever shot a model outdoors where the lighting isn't made to order? Best regards,

KennethD
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Old Mar 4, 2005, 8:56 AM   #3
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Just making a first glance observation, which is what our customers do, is this isa fine portrait and would be a seller in most any presentation.

I look at posting here with the thought in my mind of "what would this model or customer think of this shot, would she like/buy it"?

Most of us are at some point doing this as much for the money as for the art, be honest.

Microcritical observations are not all thathelpful to most of us out here.

One last thing, why would anyone criticize a model/subject's looks? Been in front of a mirror lately?

Common curtousy/sense isn't!

And yes I would like to know the specifics on your setup for it.

Thanks, I feel better now.

Randy










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Old Mar 4, 2005, 8:57 AM   #4
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KENNETHD wrote:
Quote:
Studio lighting is ok, again pleasant to look at, but nothing stunning or remarkable here. More than adequate portrait, of course, but I suppose for all the masterful critique you bestow, (not to overlook the condescending insults to my model) I was hoping for a masterpiece. The work looks like "studio work" which is not to say as such there is no appeal at all. It lacks the spontaneity I would expect from a master such as yourself. Passing marks for studio work, and IMHO the lighting works. Have you ever shot a model outdoors where the lighting isn't made to order? Best regards,

KennethD
I shared this image because of the simple set-up that anyone with a camera with selectable shutter and iso speeds and tripod can do.

The background is a cheap black bed sheet from Wal*Mart. I could have used the white wall, but decided to go with the black sheet instead.

The lighting is a north facing window and I've placed black foam board to her right for negative fill.

I see a serious flaw related to the subjects posioning to the light and hope others will see it too.

Rodney
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Old Mar 4, 2005, 9:08 AM   #5
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randy o wrote:
Quote:
Just making a first glance observation, which is what our customers do, is this is a fine portrait and would be a seller in most any presentation.

I look at posting here with the thought in my mind of "what would this model or customer think of this shot, would she like/buy it"?

Most of us are at some point doing this as much for the money as for the art, be honest.

Microcritical observations are not all that helpful to most of us out here.

One last thing, why would anyone criticize a model/subject's looks? Been in front of a mirror lately?

Common curtousy/sense isn't!

And yes I would like to know the specifics on your setup for it.

Thanks, I feel better now.

Randy
Hello Randy,

The lighting set-up is mentioned in a previous response.

Thank you for the comments.

Rodney
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Old Mar 4, 2005, 9:57 AM   #6
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RodneyBlair wrote:
Quote:
The lighting is a north facing window and I've placed black foam board to her right for negative fill.

I see a serious flaw related to the subjects posioning to the light and hope others will see it too.

Rodney
A challenge eh? Well I'll bite :-) as an interested novice when it comes to this sort of thing my natural reaction to that question is that the right side of her face isn't particularly well lit, the key light is coming over her left shoulder, which is towards us, so it gives a slightly unbalanced feeling.

That's my reaction - might be rubbish of course. Enlighten (sic) us o master. :-)

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Old Mar 4, 2005, 10:18 AM   #7
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peripatetic wrote:
Quote:
RodneyBlair wrote:
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The lighting is a north facing window and I've placed black foam board to her right for negative fill.

I see a serious flaw related to the subjects posioning to the light and hope others will see it too.

Rodney
A challenge eh? Well I'll bite :-) as an interested novice when it comes to this sort of thing my natural reaction to that question is that the right side of her face isn't particularly well lit, the key light is coming over her left shoulder, which is towards us, so it gives a slightly unbalanced feeling.

That's my reaction - might be rubbish of course. Enlighten (sic) us o master. :-)
You are close, but not quite the correct answer. I'll share the lighting/posing flaw after others have an opportunity to comment on a solution.

Rodney
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Old Mar 4, 2005, 11:15 AM   #8
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Hmmm...

The shadowson the model's right chin and neckline tend to stick out on this one. Is that what you were referring to?


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Old Mar 4, 2005, 11:20 AM   #9
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You guessed it! I should have turned the model slightly more toward the key light. Do you think that would have fixed the shadow problem?

Rodney
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Old Mar 4, 2005, 11:52 AM   #10
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RodneyBlair wrote:
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You guessed it! I should have turned the model slightly more toward the key light. Do you think that would have fixed the shadow problem?

Trust me... I am not a lighting expert.

But, on the surface, the problem with repositioning the model, is that it can detract from the desired effect of the pose. I noticed a similar problem in your latest More Michael Anthony portrait.

Rather than respositioning the models, my gut feeling is that a lighting solution of some type may be a better approach. But, if you used a fill, it could detract from the impact you wanted the shadows to have. Unfortunately, solving this conflictis beyond my area of expertise.


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