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Old Mar 14, 2005, 9:17 AM   #11
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peri,

after looking at the photo. forgive me but i think it was just a classic case of the camera focusing wrongly on the subject and then you running with it. meaning proceeded to make the scene to your liking in post processing.
am i right or am i the only one that does that in p'shop?
anyway, that was my personnal opinion.

as for the photo, as it is. it doesn't realy say much or tell a story but this i can say, I LOVE the colors. i like the mood it puts me in.
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Old Mar 14, 2005, 9:31 AM   #12
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Even though my opinion means squat, I feel compelled (I suppose because I talk too much) to offer it:

I think the image works. Here's why:

I will accept as true Rodney's assertion that people's eyes are drawn to the brightest area of the frame. But aren't people's eyes also drawn to extreme contrasts? Because here, I'm drawn to the out of focus worker because he's (1) a physically large subject (2) in an area of the frame (left third) that Westerners look to first (3) in contrast to the rest of the scene, which is focused, (4) with a bright yellow vest, in contrast to the relatively dark areas around him. To me, this scene says: Industrial stillness; its maker's bussiness. It's about how people make the world go 'round, and without us, all our engineering and inventing would be just light and cement. (This interpretation for me is completely out of peri's given context, but I intentionally wanted to view it just to get my subjective perspective.)

I like it. :blah:
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Old Mar 14, 2005, 10:41 AM   #13
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Yup, tonal contrast is an important ingredient. Background colors are fairly neautral here so that negates color contrast and brings us back to the brightness issue.

The eyes are also attracted to human figures, but here the oof subject dosen't provide much to focus on.


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Old Mar 14, 2005, 2:35 PM   #14
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berto wrote:
Quote:

peri,

after looking at the photo. forgive me but i think it was just a classic case of the camera focusing wrongly on the subject and then you running with it. meaning proceeded to make the scene to your liking in post processing.
am i right or am i the only one that does that in p'shop?
anyway, that was my personnal opinion.
:-) well there was an element of that. Actually I liked the scene without people, but as I framed it I knew that people were walking in and out of frame. I was hand-holding in low light and using the Image Stabiliser on the lens. The area of focus was pre-set, the worker is blurred because of motion - the shutter speed was only 1/13 sec. But yes, there was an element of luck - he came rushing out of the building on the right and I instinctively pressed the shutter. So was it planned? Well no not really, but it wasn't entirely an accident either. I have a bunch of other photographs with blurred people and a sharp background to prove it. :-)

Quote:
as for the photo, as it is. it doesn't realy say much or tell a story but this i can say, I LOVE the colors. i like the mood it puts me in.
Thanks, that's great, I kind of liked the colours too.
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Old Mar 14, 2005, 2:48 PM   #15
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RodneyBlair wrote:
Quote:
Yup, tonal contrast is an important ingredient. Background colors are fairly neautral here so that negates color contrast and brings us back to the brightness issue.

The eyes are also attracted to human figures, but here the oof subject dosen't provide much to focus on.

Rodney
Hmm, as we seem to be in the right room for an argument, and we might as well go for the full half-hour rather than the 5-minute quickie. (With apologies to non-Pythons.)

Let us grant you your point about the area of contrast and therefore consider the second image.

Surely the focal point of an image, even a photograph, doesn't have to be "in focus"?

Doesn't perdendosi have a point or four about why the worker is the focal point of the image even though he's out of focus. Isn't the lack of focus a challenge to the viewer? Precisely the opposite of the normal DOF convention where we have an in-focus person with a blurred background. Indeed might not the flaunting of this convention be precisely the intention of the artist?

(Blimey got carried away for a second - I happen to know the artist - I'll check. He just said "maybe" and smiled enigmatically.)

Anyway if anyone isn't too nauseated by the undergraduate pretensiousness of this post perhaps they'd like to comment. (I'm in a very odd mood tonight.)

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Old Mar 14, 2005, 3:20 PM   #16
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You fellas can argue all you want to...I'm not participating. My comments are for those who want to learn how to compose a scene so that it will most effectively present their intended center of interest to the viewer. Some may appreciate my efforts and others will not.

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Old Mar 14, 2005, 3:56 PM   #17
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I certainly appreciate your comments Rodney and think that not only can you comment, but your photos prove you can do it too.

The tone of the post was meant to be light-hearted, perhaps the Python reference passed you by. I regret that.

However I do detect rather more than a subtle hint that perhaps we all just aught to listen to you with cap in hand, take notes and say "Yes sir, thank you sir."

I was under the impression that this was a forum, a public meeting place for discussion, not a place for Professor Rodney to tell us how it is. There is room for reasonable people in good conscience to disagree over whether they think a picture has merit or not. If you don't want to participate then that's a shame, but of course it's up to you.

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Old Mar 14, 2005, 4:15 PM   #18
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peripatetic wrote:
Quote:
I certainly appreciate your comments Rodney and think that not only can you comment, but your photos prove you can do it too.

The tone of the post was meant to be light-hearted, perhaps the Python reference passed you by. I regret that.

However I do detect rather more than a subtle hint that perhaps we all just aught to listen to you with cap in hand, take notes and say "Yes sir, thank you sir."

I was under the impression that this was a forum, a public meeting place for discussion, not a place for Professor Rodney to tell us how it is. There is room for reasonable people in good conscience to disagree over whether they think a picture has merit or not. If you don't want to participate then that's a shame, but of course it's up to you.
The original question is, "Does it work?"

My response to the original question is clear...I explain why it does not work "for me" and offered an example. No one is forced to take my word for anything. Send it to the director at your local gallery and get their thoughts. :-)
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Old Mar 14, 2005, 4:27 PM   #19
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Hmm, I work just around the corner from the Tate Modern. I don't think I've got much of a shot.

Still they give prizes for slices of dead cows (which I saw and they were very nice btw) - so you never know. :-)

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