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Old Mar 12, 2005, 5:42 AM   #1
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Tried to get a candid, natural shot of grandson Trent, a little hard to get him composed well, any Ideas for improvement welcome.


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Old Mar 12, 2005, 6:55 AM   #2
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only after I posted this photo did I notice that awful shadow over the side of his face, I tried correcting this a bit but could not get it looking good in color, tried these sepia and B/W.




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Old Mar 12, 2005, 7:17 AM   #3
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Hello alady,

You have candid results here. Your efforts weren't for a candid shot, however. You'll no doubt be taking many more pictures of your adorable grandson so I'll share a tip that works well.

When shooting outdoors, find an area of complete shade where light doesn't pass through leaves and hit your subject or cast bright distracting patterns in the frame. Place your subject nearest the edge of the shaded area that you possibly can while keeping the above mentioned in mind. What you want, is to have your subject facing an area that isn't shaded such as the bare ground, concrete or water. Even a building will work. This will provide you with a big natural reflector.

The image you've shared here would have been greatly improved if you had used fill flash. Fill flash will "clean-up" the various color temps that you have here.

Until you have a better feel for different lighting situations, I'd recommend always using fill flash with -1EV Flash Compensation for outdoor shots as this.

The fixed-up images you provide are much better, but do not bring out the center of interest(eyes). In this scene, the eyes should be the brightest most distinct element.

Thank you for sharing.

Rodney
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Old Mar 13, 2005, 8:39 AM   #4
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MMM was the only shady place in our yard, I did try to use flash but for some reason the camera kept showing an error 99 every time I tried setting it to portrait or anything lower than an F8, so these were shot at F8 400iso.

Some of the shadow is not lighting but my bad editing, the baby had a bad eczema rash on his cheeks and I think my repair job was crap:-)anyway heres another go at trying to emphasize the eyes, not great but a try out:-)


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Old Mar 13, 2005, 10:14 AM   #5
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aladyforty wrote:
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MMM was the only shady place in our yard, I did try to use flash but for some reason the camera kept showing an error 99 every time I tried setting it to portrait or anything lower than an F8, so these were shot at F8 400iso.

Some of the shadow is not lighting but my bad editing, the baby had a bad eczema rash on his cheeks and I think my repair job was crap:-) anyway heres another go at trying to emphasize the eyes, not great but a try out:-)
Learning to use and understand your equipment is the most important ingredient for taking great pictures. There is no reason you should have your camera ISO set on 400 for outdoor shots on a bright day unless using an extremely long tele or you need extremely fast shutter speeds to stop fast action.

Your camera has a flash sync speed limitation. This means the camera will only sync with a flash unit up to a certain shutter speed. I suspect your sync speed limitation is around 200. Because of this limitation, setting the camera at iso400 and below f/8, the shutter speed will have to be above the max sync speed of your camera. I assume this is why you received an error message.

I suggest that you look up the max flash sync speed of your camera after reading this or let me know what camera you are using and I'll look it up for you. When using flash, it is imperative you know the max sync speed.

Rodney
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Old Mar 13, 2005, 4:54 PM   #6
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it was a big lens, I set on 400 isobecause originally baby was crawling flat out all over the place, he just happened to stop at this point. I think the lens was the problem. Oh well, theres always the next time:-)
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Old Mar 13, 2005, 5:01 PM   #7
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No, I don't think the lens was the problem. The shutter speed was the problem. Remember, your camera has a max flash sync speed? :?

Rodney

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Old Mar 15, 2005, 9:22 PM   #8
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RodneyBlair wrote:
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No, I don't think the lens was the problem. The shutter speed was the problem. Remember, your camera has a max flash sync speed? :?

Rodney

Can I hijack this thread to learn some more about flash sync speed? Any online resources you can point me to or books/videos that may explain it/give examples of effective use of fill flash?
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