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Old Mar 29, 2005, 7:44 AM   #1
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Its quite difficult to take photos of trees without over exposing the sky. I tried increasing the f value and shutter speed to get the sky's exposure right but the trees gets so underexposed. I tried using flash but I think the flash can't reach the subject because its too far.

Please help me with this kind of shot.

TIA!

here's a sample:

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Old Mar 29, 2005, 7:45 AM   #2
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now heres the over exposed sky:

The camera used for both shot is a canon 300d w/ the lens kit.
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Old Mar 29, 2005, 1:50 PM   #3
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A polarising filter can sometimes darken a blue sky. I think it works best when the sun is to the left (or right) of the picture..
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Old Mar 29, 2005, 1:55 PM   #4
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It's easier to pull detail out of shadows than it is to correct something that is pure white.
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Old Mar 29, 2005, 1:56 PM   #5
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mark040477 wrote:
Quote:
Its quite difficult to take photos of trees without over exposing the sky. I tried increasing the f value and shutter speed to get the sky's exposure right but the trees gets so underexposed. I tried using flash but I think the flash can't reach the subject because its too far.

Please help me with this kind of shot.

TIA!

here's a sample:
A polerizer filter will help as someone has mentioned. My method is to shoot raw with the exposure set just before blowing out the sky. In post, I'll create two exposures. One for the sky and another to bring out the details of the other elements. I then overlay the images and set the opacity as desired. Also, when you shoot RAW, you have a little more dynamic range.

Rodney
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Old Mar 29, 2005, 2:09 PM   #6
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Kalypso wrote:
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It's easier to pull detail out of shadows than it is to correct something that is pure white.
True as long as the shadows aren't pure black. Expose your image to get as much detail on both ends of the dynamic range as you possibly can. Then, a little curves adjustment will do the trick.

Here is the same image with just a curves adjustment. I've got enough detail here that I can do about anything I want with it. You aren't doing as badly as you thought.

Rodney
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Old Mar 29, 2005, 6:53 PM   #7
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This is fascinating! I've tried and tried (using Photoshop curves) to adjust the first picture to get as good a result as Rod has posted, but failed.

In the end I abandoned Photoshop & started again, using only Irfanview. I used Irfanview's Enhance Colors function to increase the gamma and the contrast, made small adjustments to the color - a touch less blue & a touch more red I think it was - and then sharpened it (twice) with the Irfanview sharpen function.

Here's the result.
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Old Mar 29, 2005, 8:30 PM   #8
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If you do much of this, consider a graduated polarizer.
I really prefer getting it as close to correct with settings at shoot time and minimize post processing. Yes, you can boost the shadow detail, but at the expense of boosting noise at the same time. The more I play with curves and brightness processing, the more often I come back to the original as being more of what I really tried to shoot.
Checkout John Shaw's "Nature Photography" A Field Guide, if you haven't done so already.
Thanks for these pics.
Tom B (TMc)
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Old Mar 30, 2005, 3:19 AM   #9
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Thanks for the informative response everyone!

I thought the camera's defective or something, turns out the photographer is the problem. :G

I thought i can just turn it to auto, click and everything will come out great. I miss my s5000.

I need to go out, get a polarizing filter and practice some more.

Rodney, Kalypso & Herb,

Thanks for showing me the potentials of my photo!

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Old Apr 4, 2005, 4:22 AM   #10
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as for that photo at fort santiago park- when i was there i was actually trying to shoot that same photo. i had the same problem as you. the time you shot the photo looks like about 3-4pm.. which isn't really ideal considering manila's sky is just whitesh-gray until its towards sundown.


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