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Old Jun 4, 2005, 7:35 PM   #1
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I was reading The Tao of Photography this morning. By the way it is a wonderful book. I was enjoying the tips concerning how to see a photograph. One in particular had caught my fancy, change perspective. Climb the tree and look through the bird's eye, get in the grass and see what the grasshopper sees, that kind of thing. I popped my telephoto lens on my camera body to look with a perspective that I don't tend to look at normal everyday life in, laid down on the floor and started taking pictures of things outside my window. Looking at what was there, differently.

Technically this photo isn't so good. I'm a shaker so telephoto is not kind to me without a tripodbut I was successful at seeing something differently, seeing in a wayI had never seen before. Tell me what you think.


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Old Jun 4, 2005, 9:52 PM   #2
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It looks like about 7/8ths of the photo is missing. And what is there isn't cropped well. Not being a grasshopper or bird I don't particularly like it.
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Old Jun 5, 2005, 6:20 AM   #3
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This is definitely a different perspective than we usually get of an everyday object. Visually, it is a bit lacking in color and contrast, so doesn't jump out and provide the "AHA!" factor. I might try either adding some color, or even converting to monochrome and boosting contrast.

style="BACKGROUND-COLOR: #000000"You seem to have a good eye for the uncommon. Keep on keeping on - as we used to say back in the 'olden days'.:lol:

style="BACKGROUND-COLOR: #000000"brian
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Old Jun 5, 2005, 6:35 PM   #4
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I pulled out some technical books last night because I'm having a problem. I'm noticing that I have a bias toward taking pictures of scenes that are monochromatic.

Now I read last night that contrast is what give you detail in a photo...

If you lose detail where there is low contrast how would you fix that when it comes to monochromatic pictures? I know focus is key there but is there something else I'm missing?
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Old Jun 5, 2005, 7:04 PM   #5
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Jane;

Most of what I learned about photography came from using B/W film in a totally manual camera, but that was some time ago. (like when manual film cameras were all there were) Contrast and detail are actually mutually exclusive. You can prove this to yourself by increasing the contrast in a photo and then saving it (at same quality level) and comparing the file sizes. A very high contrast pic will have a smaller file size. Also not how detail disappears in highlights when contrast is too high. Too little contrast makes for a flat, uninteresting image, though, so there needs to be some balance. Contrast between elements of a picture is usually what gives it visual interest, rather than just overall contrast. This can be done with textures and /or colors.

Hope you don't mind this edit. I used a color replacement tool to change the hue of the shadows. Another possibility would be to use Unsharp Mask to increase the contrast between local elements and give a sharper appearance.

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Old Jun 5, 2005, 7:15 PM   #6
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Gotcha... was looking again, apparently I fell asleep a chapter before I got tothe answer.:G Too many midrange tones. The book says this can be corrected in photoshop using the curves tool. I've never messed with cuves beforebut here is my go at it.



The histogram looks better on it.. (maybe not great but I just discovered the histogram) Boy this should help tremendously.
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Old Jun 5, 2005, 7:17 PM   #7
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Jane,

I think you have a good eye, but there are problems with this particular photo. Using the same subject, try a different exposure to lose the blown highlights at the top, put something dark behind the vase so it doesn't blend into the background. Use a tripod or place the camera on a flat surface to avoid shake.
I cropped out the blown spots and was able to adjust the contrast a lot more. The texture of the vase is very nice. If you can get rid of/change the background you might also try b&w/sepia/duotone on the vase texture...

Keep shooting!

mactek
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Old Jun 5, 2005, 7:49 PM   #8
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Hmmmm... if I put something dark behind the flower pot... then it won't blend. But I want it to blend. What I was looking for was a serene picture. Calming. I can certainly try it to see what it will look likebut I think that maybe moving away from what I was seeing and would change the picture entirely. The idea was to allow things to arrange themselves .... not to arrange them. That, I would have to save for a different day.

But I might just try this again with a different exposure. Especially now that I found the histogram.


Thanks guys... I need the help sometimes to see the technical problems. I appreciate the advise.
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