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Old Jun 8, 2005, 10:49 PM   #1
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Took this shot of a Mute Swan with a young cygnet coming to investigate the intruder (me). Comments appreciated.
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Old Jun 9, 2005, 9:43 AM   #2
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labirder, great subject. Just a couple of comments for your consideration:

Picture is a little too large for me to see the whole scene on my screen.

Background too dark, needs some contrast. A little fill flash with photoshop will help.

I've taken the liberty of making those changes:


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Old Jun 9, 2005, 6:54 PM   #3
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GeorgeNC,

Thanks for the comments and editing the background really does make a difference. Something else I'm still learning how to do. I tried to get the picture uploaded in a smaller size but couldn't figure out how.

Thanks again.
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Old Jun 9, 2005, 7:45 PM   #4
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GeorgeNC and all,

I have a smaller photo of the swan and cynget on my website that may make for better veiwing at: http://home.earthlink.net/~labirder/id8.html

Just scoll down the page a little.

Thanks again.
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Old Jun 9, 2005, 9:42 PM   #5
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The picture is pretty grainy. What ISO did you use?
Great subject.
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Old Jun 10, 2005, 8:30 AM   #6
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Composition isn't bad, but there is a lot of noise in the pic. I'm not sure what is causing the noise as the lighting seems to be adequate...make sure your always shooting with the highest resolution that your camera provides, and maybe turn off in camera sharpening...that can always be done with more control in post. In addition the subject on the right shows little feather detail as the highlights are blown. Spot metering on the white subject and reducing exposure by a stop or two would have helped avoid this.



Thanks for sharing.
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Old Jun 10, 2005, 11:49 AM   #7
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rjseeney wrote:
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Spot metering on the white subject and reducing exposure by a stop or two would have helped avoid this.

unfortunately you will then have a grey swan :sad:... i would spot meter off the swan and then do .5 bracket around +1, then pick the one that is the best combination of brilliant white while still retaining feather detail.... and turn your ISO down next time, that is just too much noise for a picture that seems to have plenty of light..
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Old Jun 10, 2005, 12:10 PM   #8
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Hards80 wrote:
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rjseeney wrote:
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Spot metering on the white subject and reducing exposure by a stop or two would have helped avoid this.

unfortunately you will then have a grey swan :sad:... i would spot meter off the swan and then do .5 bracket around +1, then pick the one that is the best combination of brilliant white while still retaining feather detail.... and turn your ISO down next time, that is just too much noise for a picture that seems to have plenty of light..
Bracketing is the better option...it is quite tricky to get a proper exposure on bright white objects.
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Old Jun 11, 2005, 7:51 AM   #9
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Sorry for the tardy reply but its been a busy week. I believe the ISO was either set at 200 or auto, to be honest I can't remember. I also thought the picture was grainy looking and had a lot of noise, as most of mine have been. I'm new to digital cameras and realize that I have a lot to learn and am struggling to get the quality ofpictures I have seen by others on this forumthat use the fuji s5100. Ihave been very impressed with the quality of their pictures. Mine still need a lot of work!

Some questions, does resolution refer to lowest ISO or higher number of pixels, or both? Also I have the "RAW" setting to off, does that make a difference. And one final question, does the editing software affect picture quality.

Sorry for so many questions. Your help is appreciated.

Thanks again. Bill
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Old Jun 11, 2005, 4:16 PM   #10
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1. Resolution refers to megapixels...keep in mind many cameras also have different settings to allow you to take photos at different quality as well (ie, Fine, Standard, low). Always use the highest setting.

2. ISO refers to sensitivity to light...if you think back to a film camera, films are rated at various ISO's. The higher the ISO, the more sensitive the film is to light, allowing to to use faster shutter speeds to stop action, or for low light situations. The trade off is higher grain at higher ISO levels. ISO works the same way in your digicam. Unfortunately, unless you have a dslr, anything above an iso of 200 results in a lot of noise (the digital equivalent of grain).

3. The "RAW" format is another image format. Unlike JPEG, pictures in the Raw format are uncompressed and more importantly "untouched" by the camera. That is no sharpening, white balance or any other in camera editing is applied. You would need software that is able to read and edit RAW images in order to use this setting. I would recommend getting to know your camera and how it works before using RAW. All RAW images require post processing work (although most JPEG's do too!!).



Keep shooting and things will get better:-)
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