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Old Jul 1, 2005, 10:02 AM   #1
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I decided to try something a little different for this shot. The lighting is an off camera flash.

When I bumped the contrast up for the downsized image the shirt lost some detail that I didn't care to work with, but you get the overall idea. :-)

Rodney
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Old Jul 1, 2005, 11:08 PM   #2
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Rodney,



It's a good shot.

I find the watch a little distracting though.



Terry
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Old Jul 2, 2005, 6:00 AM   #3
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[email protected] wrote:
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Rodney,



It's a good shot.

I find the watch a little distracting though.



Terry
Hi Terry,

When shooting close-ups the center of interest should be the eyes and all lines or tonal values should lead the viewer there. Full length and 3/4 type poses are different because the body lines, clothing and accessories are important ingredients with lines or tonal values that lead back to the face.

The greatest contrast is at the area around the face with less contrast on all other elements in the scene. With this in mind, I feel I've provided a pleasing view around the frame and effectively lead the viewer back to the face. The viewer is quickly drawn to the face at first glance and moves around the frame to see other interesting elements.

You have my explanation of why I think it works, now I'd like to hear why you think it doesn't. :-)

Thank you for sharing your thoughts.

Rodney

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Old Jul 2, 2005, 6:39 AM   #4
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Rodney,

I like your portrait technique description. I will try that myself.

If your goal is to lead the viewer eye's to the portrait subject's eyes, I found my eyes wondering around the picture, but continually coming back to the watch.

I didn't really notice the eyes as the central idea until you pointed it out (then I noticed you did a great job capturing the subject's eyes).

I always study a scene to make sure there isn't anything distracting in it. Sometimes small things that could be distracting are difficult to notice in the viewfinder (for example, a shiny a/c outlet).

In this case, the watch is somewhat distracting to the theme. I would have had the subject remove the watch for the photo, unless I thought the watch was worthy a possible side detour of interest.

I hope your not put out by my comments. I'm always striving to be the best photography I can be. I feel that I can only grow as a photographer if I can see the differences I can make that will make the shot better.

If I were totally happy with my photography then I know I would stop growing as a phtographer. My goal is to be world class, perhaps at the level of Ansel Adams.

-- Terry






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Old Jul 2, 2005, 8:54 AM   #5
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[email protected] wrote:
Quote:
Rodney,

I like your portrait technique description. I will try that myself.

If your goal is to lead the viewer eye's to the portrait subject's eyes, I found my eyes wondering around the picture, but continually coming back to the watch.

I didn't really notice the eyes as the central idea until you pointed it out (then I noticed you did a great job capturing the subject's eyes).

I always study a scene to make sure there isn't anything distracting in it. Sometimes small things that could be distracting are difficult to notice in the viewfinder (for example, a shiny a/c outlet).

In this case, the watch is somewhat distracting to the theme. I would have had the subject remove the watch for the photo, unless I thought the watch was worthy a possible side detour of interest.

I hope your not put out by my comments. I'm always striving to be the best photography I can be. I feel that I can only grow as a photographer if I can see the differences I can make that will make the shot better.

If I were totally happy with my photography then I know I would stop growing as a phtographer. My goal is to be world class, perhaps at the level of Ansel Adams.

-- Terry





Hello again,

I think you might be "searching" the frame to find something. Generally a distraction will jump out within the first one second of viewing. Of course, this will probably not work for you because your mind is stuck on the watch, but if you place the image in front of you, close your eyes for a couple seconds then open and count "thousand one" then close the eyes the watch isn't even seen. With or without the watch the viewer will be drawn to that area because it is the next most contrasting area.

I'm not saying I'm right and you are wrong, but I did offer this up on another forum where there are a good number of professional photographers and amateurs that are much more experienced than I am. They usually hammer me pretty good, but no one mentioned the watch being a distracting element.

Thank you again for the comments.

Rodney
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Old Jul 2, 2005, 12:06 PM   #6
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I worked with a guy who has his own pro development lab.

We'd get in pictures from 100's of pro's per week.

He'd take a few shots aside each day, and we'd analyze what was working or not working forthe photographer. He really knew what he was doing because it was his job to make a good photo look great. He quickly knew what he had to start with.

After a while, it was easy to tell who was making money, and why. The images were awesome to begin with.

The best photographers, in my mind, had a good "art" concept behind their work. Beyond that, they were very good technically. And beyond that, it was the little details.

So if I find anything wrong, it's because I've been trained to look beyond the initial impression, and really analyze a photo.

I think you have a great artistic mind, you're very good technically. Beyond that, it's the little choices like minute changes of framing,managing the details in the photo, etc. etc.

I'm still struggling with all the above.

Lately I'm working with quesitons like "how do I feel about this situation" or "what am I trying to express?". Then I try to find a way artistically to bring it across.

It goes beyond photography and more into communication.

So here's the question. What were you trying to communicate with that picture?

- Terry


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