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Old Aug 13, 2005, 8:20 PM   #1
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ok so my question only has to do with being able to expose correctly and get the sky to look good, not necessarily like this image cuz i messed with it a lot in PS, but to get the sky and the foreground exposed correctly. it seems like i have to expose for them seperately and then blend them in photoshop but that's annoying to do. any suggestions on getting them both correct would be great, without too much post processing. thanks

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Old Aug 13, 2005, 8:49 PM   #2
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This is an interesting photo. It somewhat resembles the horsehead nebula.

"it seems like i have to expose for them seperately and then blend them in photoshop but that's annoying to do"
I don't see any other possible way, unless your camera has custom/sophisticated metering capabilities. If you have PS CS2, the easiest solution would be to bracket your exposures and get CS2 to generate an HDR image. Best case scenario CS2 automatically generates an average image. Worst case scenario you play around with the exposure curves for a bit until you get the desired composition.
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Old Aug 13, 2005, 8:53 PM   #3
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thanks, i kind of figured there wasn't much to do. how do you go about blending them in PS anyway? i've had some difficulty with lining them up exactly and then figurin out what to do next...

michael
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Old Aug 13, 2005, 10:13 PM   #4
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Check out this excellent article on HDR:
http://www.luminous-landscape.com/tutorials/hdr.shtml
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Old Aug 14, 2005, 2:00 AM   #5
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there are two other option for when you don't have the tripod nor the time to take the 8-12 identical but bracketed shots needed for HDR..

#1- get a graduated neutral density filter.. probably a couple .6's would be fine.. that way you have just 1 when the difference is small, and for big differences you can stack them together..

#2- expose for the sky.. then open up the foreground in the shadows/highlights tool via an adjustment layerin PS.. then set your foreground color to black.. and make sure have the adjustment layer selected and "paint" the sky color back in with a soft brush.. basically the black brush will be un-masking the adjustment layer..
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Old Aug 14, 2005, 2:07 AM   #6
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so basically the same technique used to do selective coloring, or at least the way i do it, with the layer mask. thanks for the tips dustin!

michael
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Old Aug 14, 2005, 2:17 AM   #7
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exactly the same technique... just make sure you are using a very soft brush so the horizon blends in well..
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Old Aug 14, 2005, 2:19 AM   #8
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you can also do a gradient fill and start the gradient line at the top and drop it down to the horizon...
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Old Aug 14, 2005, 2:20 AM   #9
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i'm not familiar with how to do what you're talking about

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Old Aug 14, 2005, 3:56 AM   #10
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basically you start with the same mask as before.. but instead of brushing away the mask, you can simply gradient fill the sky.. so leave your foreground color to black.. and then choose the gradient tool.. on the toolbar will be a dropdown menu now.. choose the foreground to transparent and then drop a line from the top of the picture down to the horizon.. this will fill in the sky with black which will inturn demask the sky.. you can do this multiple times until it looks good..
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