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Old Dec 27, 2005, 2:31 AM   #1
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My local zoo has a GREAT indoor jungle, really top notch. Anyway, i went there today, and what do I see when I get there? A little Golden Tameren (sp?) has broken free and is about 1 1/2 feet from me! Joy!

I grab the camera (rebel xt) aim..and... man...bad focus... oh... no... wait... the intense humidity in the jungle made my lens a big fogged up mess.

Anyone know of anything I can do to eliminate my lens fogging up on me in the future?

Again, sorry, but didn't see where else this should go, and this is the forum I mostly post in.
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Old Dec 27, 2005, 2:37 AM   #2
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For visual reference, here's the photo i snapped right as frustration was setting in.
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Old Dec 27, 2005, 9:08 PM   #3
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When coming in from cold to warm, the camera has to be put in a cold bag outside before coming in. Leave thecamera in a plastic baggy until it is warmed up. The condensation will form on the plastic baggy instead of your camera.

dale


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Old Dec 28, 2005, 12:18 PM   #4
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This one is really really soft.
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Old Dec 28, 2005, 4:23 PM   #5
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yeah, the softness is all the condensation on the lens... damnit!
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Old Dec 28, 2005, 7:09 PM   #6
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"Time will heal all wounds." I have the same problem every summer. I shoot new daylilies early in the morning before I go to work. If I forget to set the camera outside when I get up, it doesn't have time to warm up and the lens will be foggy.
Next time, go into the humid area and look around for a while before trying to shoot. This won't help a "quickie" shot, but will allow you to shoot after the camera warms up.
Dale - I will give the baggie a try next summer.
Ron
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Old Dec 28, 2005, 8:56 PM   #7
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surfnron wrote:
Quote:
"Time will heal all wounds." I have the same problem every summer. I shoot new daylilies early in the morning before I go to work. If I forget to set the camera outside when I get up, it doesn't have time to warm up and the lens will be foggy.
Next time, go into the humid area and look around for a while before trying to shoot. This won't help a "quickie" shot, but will allow you to shoot after the camera warms up.
Dale - I will give the baggie a try next summer.
Ron
It'll work for you. As long as it is from cold, to warm and humid. Cold winter air or
air conditioning {Like in your case} is dry. Humid air can and will condense inside
the camera and can cause damage.

Jaki: That's why it's soft. The moisture collects on the cooler lens in a fine "fog like"
coating. It can happen even in South Africa, if your camera goes from a cold air
conditioned room to outside if it's warm and humid.

dale

PS: Am Just for the record, it's not necessary from warm to cold.
I the only guy who carries gallon baggies in his back pack?


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Old Dec 29, 2005, 12:11 AM   #8
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Dale, very informative. Have not experienced that yet but better to be prepared. I dug into books and this is what was said: Fogging occurs when a temp change is present. that is, cold lens in a hot day. Moisture is trapped in the housing and when it starts to cool, it condenses where it is the coolest (the lenses are made thinner so it starts there first). Solution - varied but one of them is towarm up the camera. Somebody said he uses a small portable hair dryer to dry out the camera. You need to fully warm the camera and housing without making it hot. Just contributing to the pool of solutions.

Kind regards.

Jaki.
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Old Dec 29, 2005, 10:14 AM   #9
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When placing a cold camera into a plastic bag before returning to a warmer setting, should the lens cap be placed on the lens, or left off?Would it make any difference either way?

Thomas.
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Old Dec 29, 2005, 3:49 PM   #10
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ThomasATC wrote:
Quote:
When placing a cold camera into a plastic bag before returning to a warmer setting, should the lens cap be placed on the lens, or left off?Would it make any difference either way?

Thomas.
I always had the cap on. Never thought about it before. The condensations forms on the bag.

dale


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