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Old Jan 18, 2006, 5:06 PM   #21
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i have to agree with dustin, i was taught to be responsible for all of the elements and descisions that go into a photograph and to be able to answer for them....it's also an important part of self-critique.
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Old Jan 18, 2006, 5:07 PM   #22
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this is "critiques and techniques" ........
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Old Jan 18, 2006, 5:07 PM   #23
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julies517 wrote:
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i have to agree with dustin, i was taught to be responsible for all of the elements and descisions that go into a photograph and to be able to answer for them....it's also an important part of self-critique.
very well said julie..
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Old Jan 18, 2006, 5:11 PM   #24
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"if you can dodge a wrench, you can dodge a ball" patches o'houlihan
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Old Jan 18, 2006, 5:14 PM   #25
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Old Jan 18, 2006, 5:14 PM   #26
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Hards80 wrote:
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this is "critiques and techniques" ........
Any photo is capable of evoking emotions. Any snapshot. Any drawing, painting good or bad.

I get all teary eyed when I look at pictures of the house I lived in. I go by on the freeway and the pines are stillthere and I get a feeling in my gut.

However... I'm doubtful anyone who goes by and see the trees has any "feelings"
Even the pictures of the house are meaningless.

I really believe if you have to explain your picture... You missed. All the memories and emotions anyone feels still does not make this a "Good" picture.

dale



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Old Jan 18, 2006, 5:30 PM   #27
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Old Jan 18, 2006, 5:40 PM   #28
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Well, I hope I'm not gonna add to this already squirming can of worms (...by the way, that can has fallen over already...) :-)

But I do agree this is a critiques and techniques forum about photos... so I feel the comments on the photos are justified. Some other comments made might be a bitmore subjective....

What I do find interesting is this combination:

(first line of this thread... quote) "portrait of my brothers girlfriend at my uncles wedding several months back." (unquote)

---------

(and then later... quote) "Its a fine photo for these reasons:
It seems to capture her personality a bit (at least, i would guess so), and candid snap shots are for just that as far as I'm concerned...remembering how a person was at a certain time....

Technically:
The top of the head is a bit distracting, and the focus is a little off" (unquote)

----------

So basically if we can't IMAGINE her personality by this photo ... or if MY brother's girlfriend at my uncles' wedding some months ago isn't at all similar... ORif it doesn't remind us of the flirty girl from way back.... then maybe this photo DOESN'T evoke any emotions or "gut feelings". So to us (yep me included) it's a photo which I've got to criticise and say it's a poor photo.

A photo which clearer brings aboutmore peoples'imaginations to a certain theme / projected purpose would then qualify as a good photo. It seems for a fair few people the photo posted didn't "work". For some folk it did. (and I'm glad for them). A good photographer does use many elements in her / his shots to bring about the intended theme / purpose or statement.

At the end of the day I'm glad people here inSteve's forumsare fairly civil and good mannered, and I'm glad to also see that in this thread! (well done for no real flaming here... there are 1000 other places on the internet for that!) So let's just get on with learning from each other, making photos, sharing them and being friends!

Best wishes,

Paul
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Old Jan 18, 2006, 8:18 PM   #29
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i gotta join syds quote rampage..


"There are no rules for good photographs, there are only good photographs."
-Ansel Adams


Syd i'm liking you more and more each day. lol :-)
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Old Jan 18, 2006, 9:04 PM   #30
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I guess I might as well jump in here (and swim with the sharks :roll

This photo is certainly no worse than many of my candid/portrait attempts. Thisappears to bean attempt to capture a "different face", or at least a familiar face from a different perspective. Good for you. I may be in agreement with most here that it is not very flattering to your subject in this case, but please, don't stop trying. If we don't try new stuff - harder stuff, we will never learn. In my days as a skier, and in the summers on my windsurfer, I used to say "If you're not falling, you're not learning."

As for the awkward crop, we have all seen remarkably arresting photos of extremely cropped photos. Is this what you were trying to do? Again, don't give up on the idea. Try cropping more. Is there something in the photo to lead your viewer's eye where you want it to go? With the right crop you can achieve wonders.

"...the shot is way too soft." Yeah, it looks like you beat your autofocus to the punch. Either that, or your DOF iftoo shallow. Her right eye is in focus and has nice highlights. The focus falls off far too quickly, though.

We have to keep in mind that shots like this cannot be planned and there are seldom opportunities for second takes. We have to take the lighting and other conditioinsas we find them. I have been asked to take candid shots at family gatherings and I can attest to the hair-pulling frustration of sifting through a lot of shots that almost capture a moment, but the focus is off, or Aunt Mary has something on her nose, etc. Sometimes the shots we would reject are the ones that the family wants to keep.

Mike, don't stop trying. This picture has attracted a lot of attention/criticism. I don't believe any of it is meant personally. You have many years as a photographer ahead of you. There may be many things you can learn from this one shot, and from some of the unwanted attention it has attracted.

Keep shooting, and keep making mistakes.

Cheers,

Tom, on Point Pelee, Canada
http://tomoverton.myphotoalbum.com
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