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Old Jan 26, 2006, 5:16 PM   #1
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A table.

Not sure whether this works. Feel the top of the table has burnt out a little. Comments welcome.
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Old Jan 26, 2006, 5:21 PM   #2
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The highlights are a little burnt, and the image is tilted a degree or two towards the right. This is one of those situations where the dynamic range of the camera just can't handle that of the scene.
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Old Jan 26, 2006, 6:58 PM   #3
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first off, these low/mixed lighting situations are just a nightmare to shoot in.. very difficult to get a good exposure with good white balance..

also, as it has been said you shot is angled quite a bit to the right.. and the angle of shooting itself is a bit awkward with the chair back right there in your face on the right hand side..

not really feeling the interest here.. maybe if there was an interesting couple engaged in conversation or something.. idunno.. but an empty table, just not seeing this one..

-dustin
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Old Jan 26, 2006, 10:39 PM   #4
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Supposing Syd had taken a reading with say a gray card of some spot around the table, would it have made a difference - I mean a better exposure? Just thinking aloud. Regards. Jaki
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Old Jan 26, 2006, 10:53 PM   #5
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I doubt spot metering a gray card would have helped. There's just too big a difference between the brightest and darkest parts of the image. You could maybe take two exposures..one for the highlights and one for shadows and combine the two.
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Old Jan 26, 2006, 11:33 PM   #6
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Thanks for the reply RJ...Have learnt something.
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Old Jan 26, 2006, 11:51 PM   #7
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Hey Syd;

Question: What was your lighting setup here, Syd? Looks like two, possibly three sources.(yes, the top strobe is blowing you out here)

The problem in low-light situations is not the dark(you can adjust your exposure forvirtuallyanylevel of ambient light) but the light.If you spot meter off your shadows and highlights here, you would most likely find a range far beyond your camera's capabilities.

You want to keep your shadows dark and tame the highlights on the counter top? Back off your strobe, or diffuse it. (careful or you'll lose your shadows) Or... you could bring up your secondary lights a stop or two, (decreasing the dynamic range) while decreasing your exposure by the same amount.

I like the concept and composition here, the camera tilt notwithstanding. I don't mind the chair on the right either, though I think repositioning the secondary light on that side would bring some interesting shadows into play. There isa bit of shadow on the lower left that I find a little off, but that's such a nit-picky point; forget I mentioned it. I like how the table is isolated in its pool of light, but I think it's about two stops over exposed.

Nice effort.

Cheers,

Tom, on Point Pelee, Canada
http://tomoverton.myphotoalbum.com
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Old Jan 27, 2006, 5:13 AM   #8
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Thank you dudes for your kind replies.

This was a difficult one to set up. I hoisted a metal halide lamp about twelve feet above the table hoping to give the effect that the light was comming from the candle. I also used three seperate fluorescent ring lamps, one at each side and the other more towards the left. The studio was set up to give the feel that this shot was taken through a restuarant window by a passer by.

Actually . . . it was taken by a passer by (me) through the glass of a restuarant window in Natural light mode.
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Old Jan 27, 2006, 7:44 AM   #9
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Actually,

its truly rubbish... Syd. hahaha, But you knew that anyway, right?

I know you'll thank me for my honesty.







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Old Jan 27, 2006, 8:12 AM   #10
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Fourum guidlines

3. Be Constructive
Critiques should always be constructive, i.e., giving your ideas at how you think things could be improved. If you cannot give a constructive critique, please refrain from posting negative comments.
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