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Old Jan 27, 2006, 7:01 PM   #11
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this one's the night-fighter version, with the SN-2 radar in the nose... a very rare "Swallow" indeed! either that, or a reasonably decent copy, since there were only a handful of Me262 night-fighters built before the war ended, and several of those crashed. i like the contrast and lighting in this shot,and thoughi'd still prefer to have seen a bit more of the airplane, you did a nice job in cramped quarters...
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Old Jan 28, 2006, 2:11 AM   #12
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Thanks Squirl, it is the night fighter and is one of only a fewsurviving today - hence my comment about being lucky to have it here. Aerodynamics are interesting -as you are probably aware, its design was largely inspired by the shape & dynamics ofthe shark.Have got a number of shots from differing perspectives if you are interested.
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Old Jan 28, 2006, 4:19 AM   #13
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Also, out of 1,500 made only around 300 ever saw combat. To have one survive and in such good condition is a valuable thing indeed.

GG
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Old Jan 28, 2006, 11:33 AM   #14
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SteveDak wrote:
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Thanks Squirl, it is the night fighter and is one of only a fewsurviving today - hence my comment about being lucky to have it here. Aerodynamics are interesting -as you are probably aware, its design was largely inspired by the shape & dynamics ofthe shark.Have got a number of shots from differing perspectives if you are interested.
i can't tell from the picture... is this one of the two-seat, tandem conversions?

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Old Jan 28, 2006, 12:42 PM   #15
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I'd put money on it being a tandem.

Well, Mr. Dak?
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Old Jan 28, 2006, 3:27 PM   #16
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Dual Two seater version - unfortunately the other shots are on my computer at work. Will post one or twomore on this thread on Monday, justout of interest. Showing cockpit and fuselage side on.
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Old Jan 28, 2006, 3:30 PM   #17
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Grimble Grumble wrote:
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The 262 was unstoppable at high speed but was rather vulnerable at low speed. That's where the Allied fightersambushed it and fought it to the ground.
As I recall the P51 pilots developed a tactic of following them home & bouncing them when they were on their 'finals'. Many were shot down on approach.
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Old Jan 28, 2006, 3:47 PM   #18
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A classic case of too little too late with this birdy. It was more the difficultythey were having with jet engines per se than anything else at the time that made their production come too late.

A real piece of fascinating history you have there.

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Old Jan 28, 2006, 5:02 PM   #19
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If you can find a book by Adolf Galland, a highly decorated german fighter pilot, very high ranking officer and national hero (at the time) called "The first and the last" it is an eye opening account of German fighters and their development history and a fascinating account of his carear. He flew the ME 109 mainly. He was always on the edge of being made a martyr by his own leaders, as he vehemently disagreed with them on many aspects of this war. He does give an account of the 262 as well. Very old book now, doubt if there are many left to find. I found it riveting and hard to put down, Once I started reading it. Also has fascinating photos...Best regards,

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Old Jan 28, 2006, 8:48 PM   #20
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Grimble Grumble wrote:
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A classic case of too little too late with this birdy....
GG
there was a lot of that with the Luftwaffe... i'm just glad the TA-152 never went into production. it would've beaten the Mustangs quite handily... thanfully for the Allies, only a handful were completed before the war ended, and they were never sent to operational units.

one of Hitler's biggest strategic mistakes - apart from Operation Barbarossa - was his insistence on trying to find the "magic bullet", the one weapon that would bring him victory. he insisted on constantly experimenting witn new designs,often at the expense of standardization and mass production of existing ones. i remember a wonderful quote from a former Wehrmacht panzer commander who'd been in charge of a platoon of Panther tanks... he said, "one Panther was a match for 10 of your Shermans... but you always had 11!" there's a lesson there somewhere, i'm sure of it! :G
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