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Old Feb 2, 2006, 2:01 PM   #1
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Typically seen in my shot below, I have to make a comprimise and sacrifice either the interior or the through the window scene especially the latter is brighter.Is there a magical setting by which both indoors and 'through the window' scene seen equally bright and neath as we see with our naked eyes?
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Old Feb 2, 2006, 2:33 PM   #2
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you'll have to expose for different sections of the photo and then blend them together. our eyes are much better tools at capturing real life than cameras, so unless you manipulate the image by blending it with another or dodging and burning, it's not really possible for this shot.

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Old Feb 2, 2006, 8:41 PM   #3
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The technique JohnsonM86 describes, known as "bracketing", is the best method for getting a clean capture of a scene with wide dynamic range. Some cameras support auto bracketing which can make it easier. You typically need to use a tripod when you do this, otherwise it may be next to impossible to line the shots up.

When bracketing is not an option, there are things you can do to improve your results though.

First of all, make sure that your camera's contrast setting is as low as possible. High contrast makes dark areas darker and bright areas brighter.

Underexpose rather than overexpose. You can recover detail in the dark areas, though it may be noisy. Overexposed areas are pretty much unrecoverable.

If your camera supports RAW photos, use that mode, especially if you have an SLR. Raw photos retain much more detail in the dark areas that would normally get thrown out when converting to an 8 bit JPG. Somtimes overexposed detail can be recovered, but don't count on it.

If you shoot RAW, you can use one photo to create two exposures and then blend them together.

With the photo you provided, I brought it into Photoshop and added a single curves adjustment to brighten up the darker areas. I used a layer mask to keep the right portion of the room darker.


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Old Feb 2, 2006, 9:01 PM   #4
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Is there a certain reason as to why you would like the window included in this image? If not, I think I'd opt to take the image without the window in it. That would certainly solve the problem although you'd have to use a tripod if the light is low. If you need the window in the image, you could meter off of something midtone in the tank and set the camera up according to whatever you metered from. The aquarium would probably look great but the window will be blown big time.

Have funand be sure to post if you try this shot again...I'd love to see what you come up with.

~~StitchBabe~~

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Old Feb 2, 2006, 9:24 PM   #5
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Please try and post smaller shots so to eliminate the pain of scrolling. Also that window ruins a potentially great shots. Regards. Jaki.
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Old Feb 3, 2006, 12:38 PM   #6
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It seems my only salvation for this kind of shot depends on merging two shots of the same scene in different exposures in photoshop.In fact I'd have taken a good shots of the aquarium, but would like to add the scene through the window also. Anyway, could you make a recommendation about the most practical method of merging two shots? ( It must be more than opening the pictures in photoshop as two layers and cutting with lasso tool from one layer, dragging to the next and pasting) Or please refer to a link where I can learn from. Here's another shot of the same aquarium but without bothering about the window scenery.
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Old Feb 3, 2006, 1:10 PM   #7
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If you have photoshop CS2.

http://www.luminous-landscape.com/tutorials/hdr.shtml

There are others ways to do this this technique as well with other programs or older versions
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