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Old Mar 8, 2006, 5:29 PM   #11
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Just reading Julies post and wanted to be sure that you knew what a shallow depth of field was (not wanting to patronise if you already know and if you do, please ignore the post). Hereare a couple of pics that I have just taken to show the effect of differing the aperture. A shallow depth of field is created by selecting a wide aperture denoted by a small f number e.g. f2.8 - f5.6. A large depth of field is created with a small aperture denoted by a large f number e.g. f16 - f32. The pics are of my keyboard as it is just behind my computer desk so it was convenient, although it does need are really good dusting as you will see.

Pic on the left is at f4.5 (wide aperture giving shallow depth of field) and the right is f18 (small aperture giving a large depth of field). It will depend on how close you are to the subject and how long the lens is that you are using when selecting the aperture so it is worth trying a few different ones when you take the subject.

I hope that this is helps.

Mark.
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Old Mar 8, 2006, 5:41 PM   #12
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ELDDJOC wrote:
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I did intend to make to dew drops the subject - how do you do that ?


To answer your other question I have quickly rotated/re-sized and cropped your original to give you an idea of what might work a little better. The other thing that I would try is shooting more across/along the leaves so that you can see the drops protruding from the leaves.
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Old Mar 8, 2006, 9:56 PM   #13
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What make of DLSR are you using? I am sure you can find a suitable macro lens for that make or use third parties for instance Sigma 105mm for the make of the camera you have or a Tamron, etc. Regards. Jaki
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Old Mar 9, 2006, 11:30 PM   #14
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I am using a Canon Powershot S2 IS - not a DSLR I don't think ..... ?


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Old Mar 9, 2006, 11:59 PM   #15
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All cameras are good for whatever purpose you intend them for. But having said that, sometimes if you really want to go beyond the edge, then you need to use specialised equipment. A DSLR is appropriate for any kind of photography and gives you near absolute flexibility and control.

If you want to go into serious photography even as an amateur, you might consider saving and buying one of any brand in the market. And you will enjoy the thrill of photography for the rest of time. Regards. Jaki
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Old Mar 11, 2006, 1:16 AM   #16
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Are you using the macro setting properly?.. A few times I've thought that I have hit the macro button, but in fact held it too long or not long enough. What symbol shows on your screen?
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Old Mar 12, 2006, 3:04 AM   #17
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Seems people want to make you a better photographer by encouraging you to buy more camera equipment. You have been given advise on buying a macro lens and upgrading to a DSLR. Forget it.

Your Canon is just fine for what you are shooting (so far).

I would recommend just learning more and more how to manipulate your camera and all of its controls. At the same time study the craft of photography, especially the type of photography you like.

"I tried the super macro mode, but the camera kept having trouble focusing, so I switched to normal macro mode instead."

Don't give up, just learn. One way is to experiment with manual focusing, another is to make a test target with a shape similar to a star or *. You place it on top of the place you want in focus, focus and then focus lock, move the target out of the way and shoot.

Mark was right - "With the S2 IS you should be able to get to basically 0cm with the Super Macro Mode so you will not need any other lenses with it for some very close work."

You'll have to give up on the idea of instant gratificaltion and work at your chosen craft. That's what will make you a photographer.

Jaki said, "All cameras are good for whatever purpose you intend them for." I think that is one of the most rediculous statements I have ever read and I couldn't disagree more. Your Canon is worthless for shooting indoor sports no matter what your "intentions" are. But for doing macro work it should serve you well for a long time come.

I have included two links to show the power of a point-and-shoot digital. BTW, I own a DSLR, a macro lens and do not own a Point-n-Shoot (yet).

Some incredible Nature Photography with an Olympus C-8080:
http://www.jessespeer.com/photo_jour...ier/index.html

Photojournalist Alex Majoli was named Magazine Photographer of the Year by the National Press Photographers Association, and won the Feature Photography Award presented by the U.S. Overseas Press Club.

http://www.magnumphotos.com/c/htm/Tr...&[email protected]

It's not the camera it's the photographer. Keep shooting, learn and above all enjoy.

Africa
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Old Mar 12, 2006, 4:18 AM   #18
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vwmom - I held the button until the Super Macro (Flower symbol with S in the middle) came out. But then it would not focus properly, even after 7 tries, so I shot the picture using the macro mode instead.

Africa - Thanks for the advice. Maybe I am getting a bit overzealous with my pictures - I guess there's still a lot to learn. I was hoping for clear macro pictures with larger magnification, so that was why I was inquiring about addon macro lenses.

I think I will not get a DSLR as yet, as I am far too inexperienced to be using such cameras. Once I master the DSLR-like cameras, perhaps I will move on.




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Old Mar 14, 2006, 1:35 AM   #19
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Africa, I think you woke up on the wrong side of your bed. I made the post with an open mind and in good faith. A personal affront on me won't help. You could have still made your comment and ignored my contribution if it so irritated you.

I don't know who ordained yourself righteousness? I do not make contributions to gratify the likes of you. It is people like you who make the world a bad place to live and cannot co-exits with others. This peacock mentality is patronizing and utterly disgusting.

Your reading of my statement was an interpretation: the point is that on matters of taste we shall not dispute. Please refer to what I said; it was said in context:

"All cameras are good for whatever purpose you intend them for. But having said that, sometimes if you really want to go beyond the edge, then you need to use specialised equipment. A DSLR is appropriate for any kind of photography and gives you near absolute flexibility and control.

If you want to go into serious photography even as an amateur, you might consider saving and buying one of any brand in the market. And you will enjoy the thrill of photography for the rest of time."


I am a realist and my position was not meant to be final but future orienting. If you had engaged your mind clearly in what I said, you would have noticed that all were suggestions. No one was obliged to take what I said as final. Importantly I was orienting ElDDJOC to the future rather than stagnate her.

My counsel is learn to respond rather than react to folks contributions. A correct balance between your head and heart will enable you respond. Being belligerent does not help. You could still have made your point in peace.

A crucial point: Equipment does matter. I have been a photographer since I was 12, good equipment matters. It doesn't matter whether it is dslr or slr or a point & shoot, it need be of good quality to be used effectively.

I am also sad that in your contribution you suggest that ElDDJOC cannot think for herself, is not intelligent -- a patronising mentality indeed.

That every camera is good was said in a context. Intentionality is a contextual phenomena. Experience should teach that one surely cannot use the camera in circumstances where it won't work - that for me is self-explanatory. It is not the camera that works: I am assuming an intelligent source working the camera. If my statement was wrong, perhaps you could not have said that the canon is just fine for macro - you have contradicted yourself is what I am saying.

It still remains that if ELDDJOC wants to do serious photography which involves having control over: dof, lighting, exposure, colour, equipment, I don't see how she will avoid DSLR - current and future technology or a very good quality point & shoot. You get to be a good photographer by being able to manipulate the phenomena I have listed among others. How a point & shoot will advance her skills is what I want to try and understand - this is not to say that point & shoot is irrelevant. :G

I hope this clarifies my position.

Regards. Jaki.




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Old Mar 14, 2006, 1:48 PM   #20
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Hi,

This has become an interesting thread - suprised there is no comment from Syd yet!

My take on this. I started with a fixed lens Fuji S602 Zoom which I still have and still find has excellent features. This is not a DSLR and has a digital viewfinder - something which I found very strange to begin with. I still think personally that I got some pretty good results and had full control over many settings - including a 1cm super macro that I simply cannot afford the lens for on my Canon Rebel XT/350D; good iso adjustment and a superb15 second to 1/10,000 shutter speed!

This is like so many other arguments in the world - one example I am struggling with at present is Windows vs Linux but like all healthy arguments of this nature there is no easy answer. To be honest if there was where would be the fun?

Elddjoc - the most important thing with photography is to have fun. If you can take good photos with the camera you own, go ahead! Posting pictures on here will (in my personal opinion) make you want better equipment - this is inevitable. My advice? If you can afford it and you love photography buy a "better" camera. The downside to going for an SLR? You will very soon after your initial purchase want to spend more and more on lenses and accessories. This is not necessarily a bad thing but just remember with a fixed lens camera you will get a good range of features for a good price and will not need to carry around kilos and kilos of equipment.

Regarding your initial shot, i personally would have liked to see a lot closer to the water drops - there is no real point of interest in your shot - it is a little too far away from the drops to be the point of interest and there is too much going on for the red leaf to be the interest. BUT it is not a terrible photo... it is in focus!

Have fun,

Dom
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