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Old Jun 29, 2005, 12:14 PM   #11
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hello Peter

yes, the Sales people in the camera shop mentioned the importance of glass lenses over pixel count to me too, they were the only people to do so; and when I mentioned this to other people in camera shops nearby they just sneered.....Interesting.

Did you buy the Rollei DR dr5150 in the end? Are you happy with it?
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Old Jun 29, 2005, 2:50 PM   #12
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I haven't seen the DCS review. Can you reprint it here? so we can all see it in context. That would be a great help.

Frankly (and I've said this before) on 6x9 prints of the Jessops test card this Rollei lens is pin sharp with no distortion I can see with the naked eyeto 3 MICRONS !! What more do you want for £139?

I can take a shot of the same card with a 35mm F2.8 Elmarit Leica lens to compare it. But I can tell you whatever differences there are, considering you can buy 3, 4, 5 or more of these camerasagainst a Leica lens never mind the body, and be able to pull this little thing out of your pocket and take hundreds of shots (which aremore thanacceptable to photo agencies) is what VALUE is all about.

As they say with computing 'Garbage in, garbage out'. If you have a bad lens, the more pixels you have will only allow you to show how bad the results are inlarger sizes!

The guys who told you to worry aboutthe quality of the lens FIRST, then the pixels are the peopleshould listen to with some degree of confidence. They others are shoe salesmen and carpet merchantsin a camera shop.

Racking the ASA up beyond 800 will lead to drop off in quality but the idea is to light your subject if you can to get contrast and colour/grey tonesin.

Photography is about painting with light, not darkness.
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Old Jun 29, 2005, 6:22 PM   #13
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FULL REVIEW OF ROLLEI DR 5150FROM DCS

Released amidst a barrage of Canon and Fuji cameras in the run up to Christmas, the Rollei dr5100 could perhaps have slipped into obscurity. However, not ones to be dazzled by the bright lights and marketing speak of the big guns, we're bringing this latest Rollei to your attention.

In line with the current crop of mid-range digital compacts, the dr5100 features a fairly substantial five megapixel CCD sensor. This allows for good quality enlargements of 12x10 inches (around A4 size) and beyond.
[align=center]Photo Results[/b]
Indoors
While the integral flash does generate a lot of red-eye, it is powerful enough to ensure even larger rooms are well lit.
[/align]
White balance
Auto white balance is superb, with reliable results. But with just four presets and no custom setting, the dr5100 is quite outdated.


ISO Grain/noise
Despite a 1600ISO setting the Rollei produces very noisy images even during short exposures with more modest ISO speeds.

Lens potential
Providing a focal range of just 28-85mm, the Rollei optics won't get you as close to the action on its own, as many of its direct competitors would. This issue is lessened, by way of the dr5100's screw thread lens, that allows for the addition of other lenses. But whilst this can be a temptation for some, the cost of collecting these lenses is less appealing.

Still, if it's wide viewing you're after, the Rollei dr5100 has got it covered, with an unusual 28mm wide-angle that does give it an edge over many others and offers the opportunity to create some really stunning compositional shots.
This latest Rollei also has an impressive specification sheet, with the camera catering for ISO speeds from 64 up to a staggering 1600. Combine this with fast optics that offer an f2.5 aperture at its widest setting, and you have a camera that should be able to shoot great shots in all sorts of lighting conditions. Sounds pretty enticing, right?
Not quite. While the spec sheet suggests areal cracker of a camera, the results are a long Way from ideal, often suffering from a great deal of noise and banding. Images taken in poor light in particular, look ugly and unrewarding, as our test shots demonstrate.
Taking its lead from Samsung's Digimax range, the dr5100 supports a selection of power sources, ranging from two standard alkaline AA batteries, to the more practical NiMh batteries, and a proprietary 1800mAh Lithium-ion pack. To accommodate its larger Lithium-ion pack, Rollei has designed a novel panel, which can be opened in two stages to access either memory or power. Supporting both SD and MMC memory, the Rollei doesn't come with either format card included in the bundle, and it's basic 16Mb internal memory means you'll be forking out for more.
Quick off the mark
The dr5100 is slightly uncomfortable to hold, with a dial situated where you'd instinctively place your index finger to use the shutter release button. But you don't have long to acclimatise to the quirky ergonomics, as the Rollei is powered and ready to use in just 1.2 seconds. Shutter lag is also extremely short, lending credibility to Rollei's claims of a zippy 0.12 second delay.

The dr5100 houses a respectable 1.8-inch 130,000 pixel TFT display with a useful live histogram. Its aluminium body, whilst remarkably light, gives the Rollei a sense of substance and durability. However, the camera's unfamiliar shape makes operation ungainly, and also creates problems with the integral flash. This is due to the camera's rubberised grip ,which is difficult to hold. Your forefinger typically rests in the path of the flash, meaning that shots are frequently underexposed, particularly at a wider angle. The addition of a hot-shoe for an external flash attempts to compensate, but still, we don't really expect such poor positioning from a long-standing brand like Rollei.
Despite the some uninspiring low light results, the Rollei dr5100 proves itself to be reasonably capable in daylight. The wide angle Optics allow for flexibility, and the excellent macro mode brings the closest focus down to an impressive 1cm. More creative photographers will also appreciate the range of manual controls. These include a smooth manual focus, which helpfully magnifies the centre portion of the screen.
SUMMARY

After the revelation that was the Prego DP6300, Rollei disappointingly appear to have gone off the boil with this newest compact. Aside from its wide-angle optics the dr5100 offers little in terms of innovation and even less in picture quality, not to mention the added cost of lenses and memory involved.

3/5 STARS
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Old Jun 30, 2005, 3:01 AM   #14
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Thanks. Now we know the story.

Auto white balance IS excellent. But I'm confused about custom settings. If anything's so complicated you need custom you are going to use the MANUAL balanceto take a reading before the shot anyway. That sets be balance for your session.

AS it happens, photoshop programs are now so sophisticated in image processing you can correct almost anything you take.

Difficuly to see how you get your finger over the flash. You hold (and fire) this camera with your right hand. Any journalist who needs two hands to steady it (thereby getting their right hand fingers over the flash) should cut back on their gin ration.

The optical viewfinder by the way is bright and excellent if you don't want to use the screen.

28mm wide angle lens you don't find easily. 85mm is aportrait lens. Having a lens going out to 115-150mm doesn't really get you much closer to any action subjects. You need 200+, and that is a whole different camera range with detachable lenses. You need this start thinking to pay £600+ for the kit. They'recomparing apples and oranges.

They missed the bottom line: find better at this price,buy it.
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Old Jun 30, 2005, 5:56 AM   #15
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Liz,

Max has covered most of the points, especially "at this price"

The DR/GX has many things going for it, not least of which is value for money.

However, there is noise at higher ISOs (correctable but still there), it's lightning fast on the shutter butwoefully slow between shots (especially with flash). Image qaulity is great in bright outdoor light but it is poorer when the light levels drop - a higher sensitivity is little help. The chromatic aberation (mentioned in some reviews is not (IMHO) a problem.

I like the shape and handling - most modern compacts are just too small for normal human hands:sad:

Macro performance is stunning.

I still love mine, and won't swap it for anything else AT THIS PRICE but if you're looking at aCanon S series for the same money, I'd (wash my mouth out with soap :?) go for the Canon.








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Old Jul 23, 2005, 8:45 AM   #16
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Hello all,

I'm interested on the Rollei dr5100 too. I'm looking for a beginner camera for less money (especially for landscapes and macros) - I never had a digital camera before. I found some tests from german magazines in the net:

PC go 01.04.2005 = Sehr Gut = very good
asbyon.com 14.02.2005 = empfehlenswert = recommendation
PC [email protected] 01.01.2005 = Gut = Good

Here is a test (but only in german):
http://www.asbyon.com/screen/rubrike...hte_dr5100.asp

The cheapest price for the dr5100 is 145€ ( 100 GBP or 176$) in the moment....
But I'm not sure how good the camera is in bad light situations in the evening or in rooms?
Have anybody more pictures or galleries from the dr5100 (especially in the evening)? Thank's in advance!

Many greetings,

Chris







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Old Jul 23, 2005, 12:02 PM   #17
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taken at night, no flash, using tripod
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Old Jul 24, 2005, 8:11 AM   #18
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Hello liz12345,

thank you for the picture.
You can recommend this camera for a beginner? How good is the software which comes with the camera - did you use it?

Many Greetings,

Chris
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Old Jul 24, 2005, 9:46 AM   #19
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Hello

This was my first digital camera although i have owned a manual SLR and a manual/auto compact film camera before. The Rollei is good because you can do everything manually or you can use the auto settings if you wish. The instructions are easy to understand. The software is not very good for editing photos so you may wish to use another package in addition.

One thing which annoyed me with the camera is that when using the viewfinder you cannot see the crosshairs, so focussing is not easy, and the LCD panel is hopeless in bright light conditions.

It has shutter speed priority but the aperture priority is only within 3 bands so not as flexible as I would like.

When I took some shots of a firework display (no flash, on a 1 sec shutter speed) the camera was very slow to be ready for the next shot.

However I think the lens quality is very good in particular the wide angle 28mm lens, with little barrelling and and despite reviews I haven't noticed that much noise in the final shots, (some noticeable on areas of sky). Apparently interference from the acoustic settings on the camera can interfere with image quality so I turned this off. One of the main reasons I chose this was because of the 28mm lens and the lightweight body.

The macro function is very good - I haven't experimented very much with this yet though.

If you can buy it at the price you mention then it's bargain.

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Old Jul 28, 2005, 4:10 PM   #20
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Hi. I own a DR5100. Have already taken about 2,000 shots. It did many great photos like the Venice one (below, already submited to Steve's DPOTD but unsuccessfully...).

Unfortunately, since the beginning I've noticed what I call "lines of noise", that's to say: noise isn't randomly distributed but rather concentrated in "lines", which can easily be seen in any dark areas when sensibility is set from ISO 400 to above. But it's present even in ISO 100. These "lines of noise" can be seen in the crops below.

Last but not least, from some days ago is present a green dot - about 4x4 pixel wide - on coordinates X=949 Y=482 (see the crops with arrows). Curiously enough, it appears only when sentibility is set from 64 to 200, but disappears in ISO 400 or higher.

Bottom line: I regret this purchase


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