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Old Apr 17, 2007, 11:40 PM   #11
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Just for fun, I put up a "long dead grass" pan with the CG6, about 4MB. The scenes aren't exactly identical, so I'm not sure how valuable this is. It is at the end of this gallery, an original file. Looks like I panned too fast for one thing.

http://dcexp.com/gallery/SanyoC40


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Old Apr 18, 2007, 10:59 AM   #12
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:lol:Thanks brachiopod. Yeah, I guess it'sentirely unscientific andI wasn't consistent with my tests. It's an interesting encoder torture test, although perhaps less ofa real-world one (not something we would normally film). But take it for what it is, it's something to judge by.
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Old Apr 23, 2007, 11:51 AM   #13
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If I use 3rd party software such as SUPER to convert CG6's MPEG4 video into H.264, do you think I will get the same quality as from CG65?

I like the H.264 compression from CG65 but I think I can't make a DVD from the MPEG4/H.264 video (at least at this moment). But with the simple profile from CG6's MPEG4, I can convert to AVI and then to MPEG2.
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Old Apr 23, 2007, 2:05 PM   #14
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daimadee wrote:
Quote:
If I use 3rd party software such as SUPER to convert CG6's MPEG4 video into H.264, do you think I will get the same quality as from CG65?[...]
No, not at all. The CG65 records higher quality video than the CG6 bybest preserving theoriginal video's full resolution and quality. Re-encoding the CG6 video cannot restore what was lost from the original. I'll try to give you an analogy: let's say you make a photocopy of an originaldocument using astandard photocopier, if you then make a copy of the copy on a high-end photocopier, it will not look like the original, at best it will look like the copy.

You can make DVDs from the CG65's AVC/H.264 MP4 files using many DVD creation softwares. And Sanyo's CG65 comes bundled with a Software Pack that includes Ulead DVD MovieFactory 5.0 SEwhichdoes just this.
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Old May 3, 2007, 2:57 PM   #15
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I wanted to comment on the 'Can the h.264 be edited?'. I just purchased a cg65 and have been playing with it. This is my first cam-corder type device, so I have nothing to compare this to. Nor much digital video experience. The camera itself seems to be operating great. My issues have been with working on the files on my computer. The two ULead programs provided have issues with the h.264 files. The Photo Explorer will not play the files and Movie Maker crashes on trying to import them. I submitted a support request to ULead and no response yet after 4 days...The OEM SE software can not call ULead support, only post requests to the online tool. I have not even found the Sanyo support, thier links take me in circles. The only way I found to play the files was with VLC. I just now read about SUPER in this forum and will try that to edit.
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Old May 4, 2007, 12:35 AM   #16
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Hi norcal.

I posted about the SUPER
© program: you should know that this is a video converter NOT an editor, which means that you must use it to convert to another format (eg. DIVX/XVID, WMV), and then use another video editing program eg. ULEAD, Virtualdub to do the editing. This will be a more cumbersome two-step process than video editors that can read H.264 videos. If you do not need editing, you can do a straight conversion with SUPER©.

Ideally the best way to preserve the original quality of the H.264 video is to convert it to an uncompressed (or lossless) video format - which is huffYUV avi format on
SUPER
©. However, this is probably not practical because the resulting uncompressed video will be HUGE, comparing with the original H.264 video.

Another way to do it is to convert the original H.264 to the same video codec you are going to use finally, but with a much higher bitrate "headroom" - eg. converting to DIVX/XVID, use something ridiculously high like 9999 kbps or whatever the highest setting is available on the encoder.

You also probably need to experiment with the video bitrate settings to determine how high is needed to preserve the video quality - a starting point is a comparison with the MP4 videos of the older C6 model series: the best quality setting TV-SHQ is also 640x480 pixels, and it uses 3 Mbps video bitrate. If the bitrate of the highest setting on the CG65 is also about 640x480 at 3 Mbps, and the H.264 is supposed to produce better video than MP4, at the same bitrate setting, you may need to set the bitrate to a higher value when you convert to DIVX/XVID or WMV (in my experience, these MPEG-4 codecs behaves similarly and the same video bitrate values give similar results).

Sorry I don't have a recommendation for DVD-quality MPEG-2 format because I don't convert videos to this very often nowadays (I convert to DIVX because my DVD player can play DIVX). MPEG-2 for DVD is a very different codec from the MPEG-4 codec family (XVID/DIVX, WMV, Quicktime MOV), therefore the video bitrate numbers are not directly comparable.

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