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Old May 17, 2007, 9:11 AM   #61
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Here's my two cents worth re the last two posts - "focus hunting" and "video editing".

It's not surprising that the camera has trouble focusing in low light, but there's a simple solution.I suggest that you spend a half an hour or so becoming familiar with the menu system - it's very intuittive and easy to use once you're comfortable with it.

Setting the ISO and focus lock with the toggle switchis very quick and easy. First off, I would suggest that you actually select an ISO level (rather than AUTO) that you're satisfied with in the low light condition you're planning to video. It's very easy to test out a few different ISO levels before you start to shoot a scene. Then focus on your subject and move the toggleswitch up to set the focus lock - the camera will then stop hunting. One other point that I noticed - I've set the focus range to STANDARD - eliminating the MACRO range. I set it to MACRO if I'm actually shooting something very close (which is rare). Again, this is very easy to change with the toggle switch -(even while recording).

On the editing side, the "in camera" edit and join function is very easy to use and it's also fast. I'vesuccessfully used the included Movie Factory S/W to createperfectly synched DVD's - but IT TAKESA LOT OF TIME. I'm using aPentium 4 with only 512MB of memory. I'm ceratin that an extra Gig or two of memory (and a dual core processor) would help a lot. There's also drop down menus to create video fles and folders (which I don't understand) - Caelum, maye you could post some advice when your computer is back up and running. I downloaded a free trial version of Ulead Video Studio and see that it's possible to select all kinds of file conversions - I just haven't had the time to try it out thoroughly. I did try cutting some clips with Movie Factory and it also worked fine - although it's faster in the camera.

Of course, the simplest thing is to just play the files with Quicktime on your computer and worry about fancy editing sometime in the future - at least you've got the video captured - let's remember thata superquality video camera is of no value if you're not carrying it with you !!
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Old May 17, 2007, 9:25 AM   #62
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Bob NG,

My CG65 will be here Monday. Your post interested me because it sort of confirms some things that were important to me when I chose this model.

You don't read much about in camera editing by any reviewers. Most of them think we all have some fancy editing studio like only they and MGM have. I liked the CG65 because of the big screen and the in camera editing possibilities. With my C5, I often join clips in the camera. I've heard it's faster in the CG65.

I'm hoping that I can make DVDs the same way I do on the C5. I edit in the camera, then play the clips on TV via my Panasonic hard drive DVD recorder, saving those I want to the drive. When I get enough clips, I make a DVD. It works fine on the C5 and hopefully will on the CG65. I have combined clips from a Canon camcorder, a Canon A710 and the Sanyo C5 to the same DVD. Apparently the Pany recorder converts them into one happy family during the processing.

By the way, fixing the focus is easy as you say. I've done it often with the C5. Nice feature. The ease of doing things like that is why the Sanyo hybrids still are the best choice for some of us.
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Old May 17, 2007, 9:46 AM   #63
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Setter Dog,

Interesting strategy that you have - I never thought of that - and DVD recorders are SO CHEAP these days. I'm sure that your methodology will work with the CG65 - I've connected it directly to a TV and the video output is excellent. My daughter's first comment when she saw a sample clip I shot and viewed on the TV was "it looks like a DVD". Another nice feature that I like while connected to the TV is the ability to select the video immediately by pressing the WIDE ANGLE setting and then fast forwarding / rewinding during playback using the toggle switch.

The only thing that I wish the camera had was a self closing lenscap or a thread to put a dust filter on it.
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Old May 18, 2007, 2:34 PM   #64
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Bob NG wrote:
Quote:
Here's my two cents worth re the last two posts - "focus hunting" and "video editing".

It's not surprising that the camera has trouble focusing in low light, but there's a simple solution.I suggest that you spend a half an hour or so becoming familiar with the menu system - it's very intuittive and easy to use once you're comfortable with it.

Setting the ISO and focus lock with the toggle switchis very quick and easy. First off, I would suggest that you actually select an ISO level (rather than AUTO) that you're satisfied with in the low light condition you're planning to video. It's very easy to test out a few different ISO levels before you start to shoot a scene. Then focus on your subject and move the toggleswitch up to set the focus lock - the camera will then stop hunting. One other point that I noticed - I've set the focus range to STANDARD - eliminating the MACRO range. I set it to MACRO if I'm actually shooting something very close (which is rare). Again, this is very easy to change with the toggle switch -(even while recording).

On the editing side, the "in camera" edit and join function is very easy to use and it's also fast. I'vesuccessfully used the included Movie Factory S/W to createperfectly synched DVD's - but IT TAKESA LOT OF TIME. I'm using aPentium 4 with only 512MB of memory. I'm ceratin that an extra Gig or two of memory (and a dual core processor) would help a lot. There's also drop down menus to create video fles and folders (which I don't understand) - Caelum, maye you could post some advice when your computer is back up and running. I downloaded a free trial version of Ulead Video Studio and see that it's possible to select all kinds of file conversions - I just haven't had the time to try it out thoroughly. I did try cutting some clips with Movie Factory and it also worked fine - although it's faster in the camera.

Of course, the simplest thing is to just play the files with Quicktime on your computer and worry about fancy editing sometime in the future - at least you've got the video captured - let's remember thata superquality video camera is of no value if you're not carrying it with you !!

Yeah, thanks for that. All true, and I figured that stuff out in the first 10 minutes playing with the thing (using normal focus mode and focus lock). However, that doesn't change the fact that this seems to be the worst-focusing video cam I've ever used -- and that's saying something! The thing can't focus for shit in low light, and the whole time it's hunting and hunting and hunting forever, its laying down annoying noise on the audio track.

I consider the two biggest flaws of this camera to be this focus hunting and its resulting audio noise in combination with the lack of an audio input jack. I mean seriously, who needs the headphone jack? C'mon, none of us are going to use this for playing MP3s, and who needs to monitor live audio when you have absolutely no control over it anyway (no aux input and no manual levels). They should have replaced that headphone jack with an input jack like they have on the HD2. Then again, the thing records lossy audio anyway...

Don't get me wrong, I actually love this thing already and I'm keeping it for sure (CG65) because I went in with my eyes wide open in that I knew it wasn't going to be perfect -- which is part of the reason why I didn't bother buying the HD2 for hundreds of dollars more. You buy this camera for one thing, and one thing alone (if you're smart) -- and that is for PORTABILITY.

If there was any one reason to buy the HD2, it would be for that audio input jack it has. Other than that, considering how small, plasticy, and surely easy to break these things are, along with what seems to be poorer low light performance on the HD2, and surely uprezed "HD" on that cam (what a joke, HD my ass, I can uprez my CG65 to HD too, but that doesn't make it HD, and yeah I know it has more resolution, but seriously), the CG65 is a way better value for the money IMHO.

The bottom line on focus hunting is this -- you better get real good at using focus lock, or manually focusing, otherwise you'll have focus hunting sounds all over your soundtrack. And what gives with manual focusing? You can't adjust it while recording? That's just silly. The good news is that if you're careful about how/where you lock focus (near infinity), you can pretty much run around without the need to focus at all.

Anyway, I actually love this camera, but felt like writing all of that for the folks who are contemplating buying one. This camera is not perfect, but it sure the hell is extremely portable -- to the point that you have no excuse to not carry it everywhere. And with a 4-8 gig card in there, even at the highest res, you've got hours of recording time at your finger tips. I don't think I'll be taking many stills though -- LOL! Also, I was glad to see that I have no problems editing the footage in Sony Vegas 6.0d.

Has anyone run any tests about how long they can record (battery-wise) at SHQ-TV with the viewfinder open at medium brightness? I'm curious how long that battery will last with and without the LCD open during continuous recording?
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Old May 19, 2007, 1:18 AM   #65
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I am also thinking of buying the CG65 but it is a hard choice for me. I have a Canon GL-1 with a 20x zoom and three CCD's, the picture is great and the low light performance is vary good at 9db of gain and the weight of the camera makes free hand shooting mostly shake free if the zoom is in.

However I don't do any pro type shooting any more and I find myself leaving the expensive camera home way too much.

I mainly just shoot the kids with lots of the shooting inside with weak light. (One or two lamps in the room)

How bad is the low light focus hunting in low to normal light? Does it hunt at 50 LUX?

A 10'x15" room will have around 50 to 75 LUX when lit with two 100 watt lamps or a 300 watt halogen torch lamp.

Caelum: In the thrift shop down load clip, there was one fast pan that looked like the camera had gone into 15fps mode and blurred the picture allot. How much light was there?

The junk car looked good and the camera handled the changing focus well.

I really like being able to shoot inside without using extra lights if I can.

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Old May 19, 2007, 5:58 PM   #66
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I see that B&H also has the CG65 in stock now for $359.95:

http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/produc...R_SLV_BLK.html

Their price is now comparable with warehouse123.

:-? I might have regretted buying the CG6 earlier, but at least I can still use the same spare batteries with the previous C series (I notice CG65 uses DB-L40, not 20). A small consolation to make me feel better, that's all.
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Old May 19, 2007, 6:15 PM   #67
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Blindsight,...I chuckled at your post,.....still able to use the old batteries. Well, I can't say for sure but I think the CG65 and CG6 both use the same battery and that's the same as the old C series. I'll let you know Monday when my CG65 gets here.

I don't buy every new digital camera that comes down the pike but I'll admit to buying more than I need. I have a son that is happy to take whatever I'm upgrading from and that helps me make the deal with myself. When I get my CG65, it will be for use inside and over land. My old C5 will see some duty on the trout streams and when my wife wants to carry something. I'm not all all unhappy with the C5 but I want the improved in camera editing and the larger screen to do that with. If the video is actually better, I'll be happy and somewhat surprised.

If you need reasons to get the CG65, I'm sure there will be plenty of guys on this forum that can help you think something up. On the other hand,.....you may want to hold off awhile and be the first of the group with a CG7.
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Old May 19, 2007, 9:03 PM   #68
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cg7????? You have the inside info?!
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Old May 19, 2007, 9:32 PM   #69
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Naaah,.....no inside info at all. However, it's pretty clear that new models are always coming in before the older ones are totally established. Look at the HD1 and Hd2 as an example.
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Old May 20, 2007, 12:44 AM   #70
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Blindsight wrote... I notice CG65 uses DB-L40, not 20

That is actually incorrect. The CG65 uses the DB-L20 battery. The only models that use the DB-L40 today are the current HD series (HD1, HD1a and HD2).

Let me know, if you remember, where you saw that. I'd like to try and get that corrected.
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