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Old Jan 20, 2008, 9:20 PM   #971
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Just got a HD1000 and so far I like it. I am coming from a Canon HV20, so the quality is not quite as good and editing the video is a little more difficult. But for it's size I do not think you can be beat the Sanyo.
Did video today of some cars. Set up the camera with a bracket which I mounted my Rode Videomic on. Here is a clip http://www.vimeo.com/622544
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Old Jan 22, 2008, 12:18 PM   #972
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heatwave3 wrote:
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OK….. I have figured out how to use the supplied ULEAD software that comes with the HD1000 camera to burn regular DVDs from 1080i video taken with the camera. I had a little assistance from the Corel helpdesk (owners of ULEAD) and their troubleshooting library. http://support.corel.com/scripts/rightnow.cfg/php.exe/enduser/std_alp.php?p_sid=hCNo*fWi&p_lva=761273&p_ li=&p_page=1&p_prod_lvl1=174&p_prod_lv l2=175&p_search_text=&p_new_search=1&p _search_type=3&p_sort_by=dflt


From their website:

"Rendering: Crashing problems (export)

Details: Please export the video clip first using the following steps:
Answer:
  1. At the "Add/Edit Media" step of MovieFactory, highlight all the video clips at the storyboard/title list. [/*]
  2. Click on the "Export Selected Clips" button. [/*]
  3. Use the DVD format/quality settings that you want to use for your project. [/*]
  4. Export the video clip into your hard drive. [/*]
  5. Exit MovieFactory and re-launch the program (restarting your PC is suggested). [/*]
  6. Import the saved video clips into a new project and continue it from there. [/*]
  7. Make sure to enable "Do not convert compliant MPEG files" from the "Project Settings". [/*]
  8. Finish the project." [/*]
Here's the steps I took to produce good quality normal DVDs using 1080i files from the HD1000 and the supplied ULEAD software. It's actually much easier than it sounds however I've broken it down below for those that are interested in the steps I took.
  1. I copied the 1080i video files from the camera to my computer hard drive. [/*]
  2. I organized these files into respective chapters (I was using video from a recent family vacation.) There was slightly in excess of an hour of recording. My original attempts to render and burn this video (which failed) said that these files would require 2 normal DVD discs. [/*]
  3. I opened the DVD MovieFactory 5 for Sanyo software. I used the "Add Media" function to add all the MPEG-4 files from a particular Chapter. (I wanted to try this step one chapter at a time. I would recommend this approach vs. trying to do this step for all files at the same time to avoid overloading your computer). Make sure you decide if you want the DVD to be formatted in 4:3 or 16:9 before using the "Add Media" The software is defaulted to 4:3 and you'll want to change this to 16:9 before going any further, if this is the format you want. The option to change the screen format is in the lower left corner. [/*]
  4. I used the "Join Video" function by highlighting the added files. This step took only a few seconds even when there were a lot of files to combine. [/*]
  5. The software would now show the one combined "Chapter". I then used the "Export Selected Clips" function to export and convert the combined Chapter. [/*]
  6. I exported the Chapter to the same file location where the original MPEG-4 files were stored. I used the "Fast Export DVD Compliant Video" format. [/*]
  7. This export function for each chapter was the lengthiest part of the process and varied based on the number and size of the files being exported. This exporting using "Fast Export DVD Compliant Video" converts the original 1080i MPEG-4 video file to:
    MPEG Files
    24 bits, 720 x 480, 29.97 fps
    (DVD-NTSC), 16:9
    Video data rate: Variable (Max. 7000 kbps)
    LPCM Audio, 48000 Hz
    [/*]
  8. The result of this step was a new .mpg file stored in the original chapter folder that incorporated all of the original MPEG-4 videos. [/*]
  9. I completed this exporting process for all of the Chapters I had created using the original HD1000 video files. [/*]
  10. I closed the ULEAD software and reopened it. I then started a new video project and used the "Add Media" function to add each of the new .mpg chapter files into the software. [/*]
  11. Each of these imported mpg files were automatically indexed as the start of a new Chapter in my DVD file. You can then use the "Enhance Video" function to add sub-titles, background music and a few other editing capabilities. [/*]
  12. I then used the "Next Step" function to create a DVD menu. [/*]
  13. Lastly I clicked "Burn Disc". This new movie video took that same information that was going to need 2 DVDs and easily fit it onto a single normal DVD disc. The quality is more than good enough for family and friends and better than most home videos. [/*]
  14. Burning copies of this DVD takes less than 3-4 minutes for a 1+hr video using this method.[/*]
A few comments about the original video taken by the camera:
    • I'm really disappointed in the quality of the EIS stabilization software in the camera. I would have definitely preferred the normal motion of the video camera over the EIS attempt to stabilize which I found to be far worse that the original motion. I will NOT use the EIS in the future. The camera would have produced much better quality video if it had used Optical stablization instead of the lower cost EIS [/*]
    • I wish I had remembered to use the "wind noise reduction" feature on the camera as the wind noise was quite loud on a sailboat trip we took. Note to self: activate this feature when ever recording outdoor video where there's even a remote chance of wind noise.[/*]
Overall, I now find the software quite easy to use following the steps above. This approach retains the original MPEG-4 files on my hard drive for use in the future when HD burners and players are more commonplace and reasonable priced. In the interim, this approach allows very good videos to be shared with family and friends on normal DVDs which are the standard in most homes today.

Let me know if this works for others of if you have any questions. Sorry for the long post, however I'm hopeful these steps make it easier for others to record their HD1000 files to normal DVDs.
Hey, so how long was entire process from beginning to the end (disk burned) ?
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Old Jan 22, 2008, 11:16 PM   #973
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vikajakub wrote:
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Hey, so how long was entire process from beginning to the end (disk burned) ?
To be honest, I'm not exactly sure as I spread it out over several days. Here's my best guess. Assuming you have a total of 1hr of 1080i contained in 100 individual clips. And you wanted to organize these 100 clips into 10 chapters. And you want to burn these 10 Chapters toone normal DVD using the supplied ULEAD DVD MovieFactory 5 for Sanyo software.

My best guess on time needed for this project goes like this:
  1. 10 seconds to join the clips in each of the 10 Chapters. [/*]
  2. Assume each Chapter has 6 minutes of 1080i video. To export and convert each Chapter might take 30-60 minutes depending on the speed of your computer. This time of course would need to be multiplied by the number of Chapters, but since you are doing this work in "chunks" you can spread it out when its convenient. But 6 x45 minutes is still 4.5 hrs...not a short effort but manageable for my purposes. [/*]
  3. Finally, building a new video project using the newly converted .mpg files and burning to a disc is about 15 minutes for the first disc and 2-3 minutes for each disc after the project is saved. [/*]
  4. You'll need to add any additional time for editing, and other enhancements to the video. I did no enhancements so I had no additional time.[/*]
So what's the total time to burn 60 minutes of 1080i to a nomal dvd including the conversion time? Best guess around 6-7hrs, not including saving and organizing your clips to your harddrive. Best suited to work being spread over multiple days when its convenient. Clearly not a speedy process but at least its not impossible and the quality is definitely good. Better than most home videos taken with other cameras. I would imagine that HD DVDs at 1080i would be truly amazing.
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Old Jan 23, 2008, 12:08 PM   #974
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robpowers wrote:
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Here are my settings for converting HD1000 footage to cineform HDV intermediate for use in most editing software at real-time or near-realtime (depending on your hardware). But note that using the cineform intermediate HDV codecs will give you a tremendous playback boost due to it's lower processor overhead and still look great.
720 60p workflow:
Shoot on the HD1000 at 72060p
In Vegas 8.0a Choose the HDV 1280x720 30p template.
Field Order: None (Progressive scan).
32-bit floating point pixel format.
Deinterlace Method: None

For Render choose: HDV 720-30p intermediate template.

1080i 60 Workflow:
Shoot in 1080i on HD1000
Use Custom 1920 x1080 29.970 fps setting (or you can just click on the folder icon on the project properties window and it will set this for you.
Field order: Lower field first
Pixel aspect ratio: 1.000
Frame rate: 29.970
Pixel format: 32-bit floating point
Deinterlace mode: None

For Render choose: HDV 1080-60i intermediate template

Then I edit in premiere.

I also experimented with converting to 24p at render time but I didn't like the strobing and weird motion blur created. I tested this in Vegas and also in after effects with Magic Bullet. Both looked bad to me so I'm sticking with the above frame rate workflows for now.
Thanks for posting this. I am doing it the same except just using the HDV redering codac that comes with Vegas. The imported m2t files works great in Premiere.
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Old Jan 25, 2008, 1:37 PM   #975
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Anyone in here want to trade their HD1000 for an HD700 + cash?

I actually own both, and I actually like both a lot, but for different reasons. Obviously, the advantage of the HD700 is shear portability, it rules for that. But, I'm working on a video project that requires two cams, and I've decided that I'd like the footage to better match each other (e.g., by using two HD1000's instead of one of each HD700 and HD1000).

Anyway, anyone in here already knows the pros and cons of both models, so I was just hoping to maybe find someone that might want the other model from what they have today. In this case, I'm thinking it'd be someone who has decided the HD1000 is just too big for them, or wasn't worth the additional expense.

If that's you, then PM me cause I'm interested in a trade, plus I'll give you the current difference in price in cash between the models as stated on Amazon right now.

Let me know...
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Old Jan 26, 2008, 2:32 AM   #976
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For Mac users with the green screen issue.

http://www.macupdate.com/info.php/id/23875/avc1decoder

the avc1Decoder 0.72 seems to help. download and drop in your /library/quicktime/ folder and see if the footage can now be played by quicktime. the blank green screen should go away but the smoothness of playback will depend on the speed of your machine.
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Old Jan 26, 2008, 7:37 AM   #977
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altmachine wrote:
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Ironically, the $800 Merlin stabilizer costs more than the Xacti. But it seems like a killer combination with a 10-ounce camcorder. Basically, the small camcorders need more mass to stop the shakes, even if you just mount them on a steel bar without the gimbal.
I wonder, how good do you think the chances are of being able to cheaply make some cheap DIY-contraption for stabilization purposes?
Preferably one for placement in front of your chest during downhill skiing or on a bicycle ride. Any imprivement regarding camcoder motion would IMO be worth the weight and bulk penalty, if I use a car anyway to close to where I would commence the video shooting.
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Old Jan 31, 2008, 6:42 AM   #978
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All in one solution for home video editing and burning of Sanyo HD1000 1080i footage.
[/b]

Native editing of Sanyo HD1000 1080i footage with Nero8.


Nero8 is capable of fast native editing of HD1000 1080i footage when your PC is fast enough. All testing was done on a Dual Core 2.4ghz, NVIDIA 8800GTS 320mb, Seagate Barracuda 7200rpm system and that is good enough for fast, high quality results. Even smooth full screen playback of an edited HD1000 1080i video is possible. Splitting and cutting is fast and easy. A lot of text effects are present and easy to use. Same for the transitions (even a very good crossfade is present). You want effects to improve or change your video? No problem. You can dump all kinds of still pictures on the video track and all kinds of music files on one of the two audio tracks. Adding your comments with a microphone is possible too. Audio editing is very limited, but you can fully edit your audio files in another module of Nero8 if you want to.


Burn edited video with menu straight to DVD for use on a DVD player with Nero8.


After editing push Next and choose Make DVD with edited movie/DVD-Video.
Push More and then push Video Options
On General tab choose right Video mode for your country: PAL or NTSC.
Choose DVD-Video tab. All settings automatic except for encoding mode: HQ (2-pass VBR).
Push Next and make a nice menu or choose not to.
Push Next again and watch a preview of your project if you want to.
Push Next again and push Burn.
Converting and burning took 2.5 times the duration of the edited video (1 pass 30% faster).
File size will be 50mb for 1 minute of edited video. This is 1 hour 30 minutes on a DVD5.


Burn edited video with menu straight to normal DVD in Full HD for use on PS3 with Nero8.


After editing push Next and choose Make DVD with edited movie/AVCHD.
Push More and then push Video Options
On General tab choose right Video mode for your country: PAL or NTSC.
Choose AVCHD tab. All settings automatic except for encoding mode: HQ (2-pass VBR).
Push Next and make a nice menu or choose not to.
Push Next again and watch a preview of your project if you want.
Push Next again and push burn.
Converting and burning took 14 times the duration of the edited video (1 pass 30% faster).
Disk cannot be read by my Windows XP PC, so I don't know exact file size.
Is MP4 AVCHD, so I guess around 80 mb/min. This is almost one hour on a DVD5.


Export edited video to a file and data burn for use on PS3 with Nero8.


If you are not in need of a menu, exporting your edited video to a file in a Full HD format and burn this file to a normal DVD (normal data burning mode) is the way to go. After a lot of testing two options seem to be best for PS3. Full HD quality is excellent in both options, so why two? The MPEG2 option if you want high converting speed and high compatibility with other editing programs at the cost of large files. The Nero Digital AVC option if you want small files (almost half the size of the MPEG2 option) at the cost of converting speed and compatibility.


Option1. Export to MPEG2 Editable BlueRay Disk compatible file.

Choose format MPEG2 and profile Editable BlueRay Disk compatible file for your export.
Push configure button and choose the following settings for excellent Full HD quality:
Choose right Video mode for your country: PAL or NTSC.
Sample format: Interlaced (bottom field first).
Quality setting: Custom.
Bit rate: 21.537 kbit/s.
Encoder quality fine tuning: 100.
Encoding method: HQ (2-Pass VBR).
Nero SmartEncoding: Enable.
Converting took 3.5 times the duration of the edited video (1 pass 30% faster).
File size will be 150mb for 1 minute of edited video. This is around 30 minutes on a DVD5.


Option2. Export to Nero Digital AVC HDTV-AVC file.

Choose format Nero Digital AVC and profile HDTV-AVC for your export.
Push configure button and choose the following settings for excellent Full HD quality:
Choose frame rate. 25 fps for PAL country or 29.97 fps for NTSC country.
Size: 1920x1080
Bit rate: 11.978 kbit/s (original HD1000 footage is 11.979 kbit/s).
Encoding method: High Quality (2-Pass).
Audio format: Dolby Digital (AC-3) 5.1
Converting took 12 times the duration of the edited video (1 pass 30% faster).
File size will be 80mb for 1 minute of edited video. This is almost one hour on a DVD5.

Note: I live in The Netherlands (PAL country), so all testing was done in PAL setting.

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Old Jan 31, 2008, 12:28 PM   #979
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Hi - great info. Can you give me some hint about Editing in Nero 8? Are you using NeroVision option? Can you maybe put here few steps how to grab video from the card, simple edit (merge files), add sound and save- so it is easy to follow? Many thanks :-) Nero is not the easiest thing I tried...
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Old Jan 31, 2008, 12:28 PM   #980
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Hi - great info. Can you give me some hint about Editing in Nero 8? Are you using NeroVision option? Can you maybe put here few steps how to grab video from the card, simple edit (merge files), add sound and save- so it is easy to follow? Many thanks :-) Nero is not the easiest thing I tried...
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