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Old Mar 30, 2006, 11:05 AM   #11
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Thanks cgf. That looked good. Then I saw this:

Everything is included in The FilmMachine package, you only need Cinema Craft Encoder SP 2.5, 2.66, 2.67 or Canopus Procoder for encoding the video. Because these are commercial programs they are not included. You must install the video encoder prior to starting The FilmMachine.

Here we go again! I don't have them. I'm not paying for them. It might not work.
It looks like I'm a real moaning sod and I do appreciate your replies but I am now thinking in terms of the C6 and a very large lump hammer.
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Old Mar 30, 2006, 1:29 PM   #12
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I think I may have found a way out of the maze.
This is what I did after I downloaded DivX and MP4cam2avi.


1. Insert SD Card.
2. When prompted, upload to Sanyo Pex File.
3. Batch convert to avi with MP4cam2avi
4. Compose\ Edit Movie in Windows Movie Maker
5. Save project to My Videos.
6. Open ULead Movie Factory 4. Select Create Video DVD. Add Media - ie the project in My

Videos. Adjust project settings to choice.
7. Burn DVD.
8. Play DVD
9. Open bottle of Shiraz.
10. Drink the ruddy lot.

Thanks for all your help. I'm probably doing something wrong . I still haven't a clue what DivX is or what it does. I'm sure there must be an easier way of doing this (and I still don't know whether I should tick Two Pass Conversion or Support X Disc or Do Not Convert Compliant Mpeg Files on Project Settings) but I feel that's all my frazzled brain can take for now. I'm off for a lie down.
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Old Mar 30, 2006, 5:26 PM   #13
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Hey Inspector:

I am glad you are not giving up the C6 because of the difficulties with the digital video!

If you like to understand a little bit more about what all these techno-jargons:

DIVX is a video codec. CODEC = COmpressor-DECompressor

The oldest digital video files are exactly like picture flip-books, with every frame containing a different plciture. It is easy on the computer processer (just "flipping the pages") but it is hard on filesize (huge!!)

Modern digital multimedia files use "compression" - just like MP3 audio, video compression uses a set of computer codes = COmpressor-DECompressors for this purpose. These works on the presumption that there are many similarities between one frame and the next (eg. same background; arms and legs moving slightly, but they are recognisable as an arm and a leg throughout the video). Therefore the computer can store a fewer number of frames (called keyframes), and use them to "create" the subsequent frames from extrapolation and projection of the movement etc using these computer codes or "codecs". Video filesize is much smaller, but the demand on the computer processing power (or video card processing power) increases.

DIVX belongs to the family of latest codecs called MPEG-4 (FYI: DVD is a form of MPEG-2 format). Other currently popular examples of MPEG-4 video profiles are XVID (open source non-commercial), WMV (Windows Media), RM (latest Real media), MOV (Apple's QuickTime). This is where the confusion comes because unlike DVD, there is no single MPEG-4 industrial standard. To make things worse, the video file extension does not always tell you what type of codec it uses - proprietary commercial formats like WMV, RM, MOV (QuickTime) etc require specific file extensions, but DIVX and XVID will work with any of the older Window's video file extension (AVI, MPG, MPEG etc.).

MP4 is supposed to be a "raw" MPEG-4 format, an older version of MPEG-4 codec created by Apple. It is currently not a popular MPEG-4 "codec". I don't know why Sanyo would choose this format (maybe because like many older codecs it is free and they do not have to pay Apple royalty to use it??). It is strange though because many MPEG-4 codecs have a lot of functional similarities, to the extent that some players can play other codecs even though they are not specifically designed for it - see another post in this Sanyo forum about certain DVD players that support DIVX ("DIVX certified") can play MP4 files (I don't fully understand this).

Some software video players like Media Player Classic and VLC player have built-in codecs to play many file formats, without having to install these codecs. Windows Media Player can play SOME (like DIVX/ XVID) when the codec is installed, but it does not play many other proprietary codecs (like Real Media and QuickTime). If you want to use video editing softwares, you may have to install some codecs. However, the latest (paid) video editors probably come with many codecs (at least the most popular ones) pre-installed.

The freeware program AVI2DVD is only for DVD conversion, burning and authoring. It allows simple joining but it is NOT a video editor (ie no scene transition, audio commentary creation, screen titles etc). Your ULead Movie Factory has full editing and DVD converion/ burning functions. The version included with the Sanyo should have built-in MP4 file support, but for some reason it is not working in your computer. I know for sure ULead should work with other more popular MPEG-4 codecs like DIVX (when the codec is installed) - this is what vincesd described with his experience: converting to DIVX AVI first using MP4CAM2AVI, then use Movie Factory to do the editing and DVD conversion/ burning.

If you find using Windows Movie Maker to do the editing works, and you are more familiar with this program, that is fine. However, there is one note of caution - there is one more round of video conversion (from AVI to WMV by Windows Movie Maker, then from WMV to DVD by Ulead). More rounds of video conversion means more loss of the original video quality.

If you want to avoid unnecessary video conversion, you should stick to an all-in-one video editor/ DVD burner program - freeware versions of these are more difficult to find, otherwise you have to pay for commercial programs. If you find the final quality on DVD not very good using your method, you should consider using the ULead to do video editing instead of Windows Movie Maker - which means: "converting" the MP4 to DIVX AVI using MP4CAM2AVI, then open the AVI file(s) in ULead Movie Factory for editing, joining etc. and finally burning it on DVD.
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Old Mar 30, 2006, 5:59 PM   #14
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Hi blindsight. I really appreciate your help and your detailed knowledge. It is late over here in England so I will study your informative post in more depth tomorrow.
I have been looking on the DivX player at the video I shot and it definitely looks better to me on that system. The jerkiness seems to be lost and the definition is better. I am going to experiment tomorrow regarding burning the dvds.
Thank you again. The lump hammer is definitely back in the box.
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Old Mar 30, 2006, 7:34 PM   #15
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Hi Inspector:

If you find that the quality of video is better in some software video players, part of the problem of your "poor video problem" (eg. jerkiness) is due to computer hardware limitation.

If this is the case, you may want to try a software video player which is less taxing on your computer, like the VLC player. I find that MP4 and DIVX videos play better (smoother) on the VLC player than on Media Player Classic and Windows Media Player, plus using less computer resources (processing). I haven't used the DIVX player from DIVX.com for a long time.

My laptop is an IBM Thinkpad with Celeron 2 GHz, 200 MHz FSB, 1 Gb 133 MHz DDR RAM, and no-fancy onboard video. Specs are quite similar to (if not worse than) yours. I also have no problem playing smooth video in my laptop.

Some basic computer advice (no, I am not a computer pro!) - maybe you have too many installed programs that are (partly) "loaded" when you boot up and put a little icon onto the desktop menubar -

"Partly loading" a program when the computer starts up will make these programs available for use faster. The problem is: they also use up some Windows resources all the time and slow other programs down. Playing video must be one of the most demanding activities on a computer, that may be the cause of jerkiness and block effects when resources are exhausted.

To remove all those little icons/ prevent programs from loading at start up - click on the program icon and find something like "options" or "preference" or "Tools". You have to explore many different tabs, and I can't tell you where exactly things are, but eventually you may find an option to check/ uncheck "load program at start up" or similar - uncheck it.

Preventing programs from loading at start up doesn't mean totally stopping the program from working - it just mean when you click it on, it takes longer to get ready.

Of course, you should not uncheck this function for vital programs like antivirus and firewalls!

I know your ultimate goal is to burn the videos onto DVD, so the above may not be that relevant to you.

(Just more stuff for you to read through tomorrow!)
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Old Mar 31, 2006, 3:07 AM   #16
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Thanks again blindsight. I always keep on top of the Startup by running msconfig and unticking the unnecessary programmes. (I Google first to see whether or not they should be kept). It's a good tip though and good computer housekeeping.
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Old Mar 31, 2006, 5:15 AM   #17
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The Inspector, you remind me a lot of myself when I started with this kind of "codec???.. what the @*#%& is this?.. experience".. soon you'll understand things better and you'll find your own method.. (sorry for the offtopic)..

here you'll find information, guides and freewares for video conversion:
http://www.afterdawn.com/
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Old Mar 31, 2006, 5:47 AM   #18
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Thanks cgf. Looks a very useful site. In a few weeks time, I'll probably be advising newbies myself!
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Old Mar 31, 2006, 7:26 AM   #19
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Hi again Inspector,

I prefer to knock something together quickly rather than spend hours perfecting a CGI masterpiece, so my steps are:

1. Insert SD Card.
2. Copy MP4's to folder on PC.
3. Batch convert to avi with MP4cam2avi
4. Compose Edit Movie in Ulead movie Factory 4 (Full version, not the one that came with the camera)
5. Burn DVD.
6. Play DVD
7.Look embarrased at seeing yourself on DVD dancing in a Manchester club after a day-long pub crawl of 15 pints

I think once you work out 'your' way of doing it, you'll find it becomes much easier. I tried using Premiere elements for a while, but even though its more powerful than the Ulead software, I found the learning curve was slowing me down, so I've gone back.

All the best

Vince
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Old Mar 31, 2006, 10:03 AM   #20
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If those 15 pints you drank were Joey Holt's finest, I'd love to see the dvd!
As you say, it's whatever works. I just wish the manufacturers would put as much thought into the DVD-making process as they have with the camera.
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