Go Back   Steve's Digicams Forums > Digital Cameras (Point and Shoot) > Sanyo

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old Sep 2, 2006, 11:08 AM   #1
Member
 
blegate's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Posts: 67
Default

Well I decided to purchase a used C6 from a guy through Amazon and I noticed it's got two bad pixels. They show up @ night videos from what I can tell. I'm creating a DVD as I write this to see how bad it would be on the big screen. I expected I could run into this problem especially buying used camera. Fortunately there is a return policy.It was such a slamming deal...to good to be true.

You think I should return it? I'm leaning towards that direction.




b

blegate is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Old Sep 2, 2006, 1:41 PM   #2
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Posts: 398
Default

If you cannot live with the bad pixels, by all means return it for the money back.

Even if you are looking for an exchange (which is probably not your case since you are buying a used cam), there is a good chance you will get another one with bad pixels - I don't mean to trash the Xacti series, but many users reported getting cameras with bad (hot/stuck/dead) pixels even when they purchase the cameras new, and many also reported getting another (and another ....) one with bad pixels when they exchange it. I also have the same experience, with a C6 with a bad pixel noticed on arrival, being exchanged for a second, apparently good cam, which eventually developed a stuck pixel about 3 months later (not daily use, only one trip and few weekend pics).

I still like the convenience of the C6 and decent video quality. If you treasure all the features and convenience other than the bad pixel, there are ways to remove the bad pixel from video, which involves using a few freeware softwares, plus the video MUST NOT be taken with image stabilization (otherwise the bad pixel will dance around instead of being stationary). The result is not perfect but decent (especially when you only have one or two pixels, and they are not too big). If anyone is interested I'll spend some time writing up an instruction for posting here.
blindsight is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Sep 2, 2006, 11:14 PM   #3
Member
 
blegate's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Posts: 67
Default

blindsight wrote:
Quote:
If you cannot live with the bad pixels, by all means return it for the money back.

Even if you are looking for an exchange (which is probably not your case since you are buying a used cam), there is a good chance you will get another one with bad pixels - I don't mean to trash the Xacti series, but many users reported getting cameras with bad (hot/stuck/dead) pixels even when they purchase the cameras new, and many also reported getting another (and another ....) one with bad pixels when they exchange it. I also have the same experience, with a C6 with a bad pixel noticed on arrival, being exchanged for a second, apparently good cam, which eventually developed a stuck pixel about 3 months later (not daily use, only one trip and few weekend pics).

I still like the convenience of the C6 and decent video quality. If you treasure all the features and convenience other than the bad pixel, there are ways to remove the bad pixel from video, which involves using a few freeware softwares, plus the video MUST NOT be taken with image stabilization (otherwise the bad pixel will dance around instead of being stationary). The result is not perfect but decent (especially when you only have one or two pixels, and they are not too big). If anyone is interested I'll spend some time writing up an instruction for posting here.
Please do as I just reviewed the video (dvd) on my big screen and only one white pixel shows in dark scene. If there is an EZ way to remove or darken the pixel, please let me know soon.I haven't decided if I'm going to return the camera or not.

thanks
blegate is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Sep 3, 2006, 11:09 PM   #4
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Posts: 398
Default

I'll just describe what programs you need and how much effort and tinkering you have to deal with the video, before writing up the whole instruction sheet with exact keystrokes which takes a long time.

It is NOT an easy way.

NOTE: the bad pixel(s) must be stationary and does not move with the video - in most cases, when you switch off the image stabilizer, it should stay still. If the bad pixel(s) dance around as when you are using the image stabilizer, this method does not work, because it replaces the position of the bad pixel with an averaging of (presumably) similar pixels immediately around it. The smaller the bad pixel(s) the better the final result.

You need these programs:

MP4CAM2AVI (freeware) - to "convert" the MP4 video format into XVID/ DIVX AVI format. This part of the conversion is straightforward, I'd say 5 minutes or less.

XVID codec (freeware) - so that the third program can read the converted video format. This part is also easy, say 2-3 minutes installation of the codec.

VirtualDub (freeware) - the video editor that fixes the bad pixel.

a third-party DeLogo plugin for VirtualDub (freeware) - this is the actual plugin that works in VirtualDub in fixing the bad pixel. This is the most difficult part, where you need to:

(1) make a still capture of a video frame containing the bad pixel
(2) paint the bad pixel (and maybe the surrounding pixels) with red color and save this changed frame
(3) go to VirtualDub and apply this frame to the video using the plugin

steps (1) and (2) takes some time, depending on your computer skill, plus some trial & error (to get the best patching result) - I'd say up to 1/2 hour when you do this for the first time.

Then you have to use VirtualDub to re-encode the whole video (preferrably using XVID codec: VirtualDub does not support MP4): I can't tell you how long it takes because this depends on the speed/ power of your computer, length of your video and the video resolution/ bitrate etc.

If you are still interested I can write up an instruction sheet. I can't do this right now because I am rather busy for a few weeks or so.
blindsight is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Sep 3, 2006, 11:28 PM   #5
Member
 
blegate's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Posts: 67
Default

blindsight- I think from what you've told me I can figure it out. I've already got MP4CAM2AVIand VirtualDub but not the plug in. I've fairly savvy with systems.

I just can't decide if I want to keep this unit. It does seems to do a good job in daylight. The problem only shows up in dark scenes. It would be cool if everything was perfect but it looks like these hybrids have some CCD issues- oh well.

Thanks for giving me some direction on what needs to be done to correct the pixel problem.



b
blegate is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Sep 4, 2006, 8:31 AM   #6
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Posts: 398
Default

Hi blegate - it's good to hear that you are computer savvy. Sorry I may have been longwinded because I don't really know your level of computer skills.

This is the DeLogo filter of VirtualDub from neuron2.net

http://neuron2.net/delogo132/delogo.html

(instruction and download)
blindsight is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Sep 4, 2006, 2:44 PM   #7
Senior Member
 
Caelum's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Posts: 1,030
Default

If it's "hot pixels" that appear ononly when shooting in the dark, you might be able to "unstick" them withbright light. CCD "hotpixels" apparently are generally more likely to appear with longer exposures (and higher ISOs) andwhen the CCD iswarmer. I had a couple ofhot pixels appear this summer while I was shooting indoor at night. Idischarged another camera's flash at the lens, somehow itunstuck thehot pixels. No guarantees but it worked for me.
Caelum is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 5:17 AM.