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Old Oct 10, 2005, 1:46 PM   #31
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rpc212 wrote:
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http://www.sd9.org.uk/news.htm


So it looks like Foveon and Sigma are working on that new DSLR and hopefully it is coming along really well and will have everything that we wish for on/in it! that sensor will be great if it has low noise and is 5.6 x 3! Wow! Anyway I hope this helps those, like me, waiting for that new Sigma DSLR.

rpc212
Rumors of an impending release from supposedleaks have been circulated for years, nothing has ever come of them. So far, the only verifiable, concrete evidence that I have seenof something new in the works isposted here:

http://forums.sigmadslr.com/viewtopic.php?t=73




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Old Oct 10, 2005, 1:54 PM   #32
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marsha7 wrote:
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I just stumbled onto this topic, as I have never heard of Sigma cameras and not familiar with Foveon technology...can anyone enlighten me or steer me to a website for info???

Is Sigma just a cult brand (do not take insult, just asking an honest question) kinda like Betamax vs VHS in the old VCR world?

After looking at sites for Pentax, Canon, Nikon, Olympus, Samsung, etc, this is a new one for me...do they make their lenses or do they use the lenses of others???

Are they sold in camera stores or just on the net?

Thanks for taking the time to respond.
Hi Marsha,

Sigma has made both cameras and lenses for many years. They are, by comparison with large corporations such as Canon, Nikon, etc., a small company. When Foveon, a small R&D company headed by some of the finest minds in Silicon Valley, invented their rather unique sensor, Sigma agreed to put it into their SLR camera and produced the Sigma SD9 which was followed by the Sigma SD10. They are available from some large camera stores aound the U.S. such as B&H in New York City and a few west coast stores, but mainly sold on the web.

Sigma makes some very, very good lenses and have done so for many years. Their lenses are widely available in camera stores and they have mounts for nearly all major cameras such as Canon, Nikon, Olympus, Pentax, etc.

The Foveon processor is quite different from any other type. Rather than a single layer of silicon with photosensors which interpolate information from adjacent photosites and processed via a bayer filter to produce colors, the Foveon sensor has three layers which directly apprehend the RBG colors. This is why the Foveon is called an X3 sensor. The file produced by the Foveon results in a 3.4 megapixel matrix, but it is made from over 10.2 million photosensors (3.4x3.4x3.4). The pixel level sharpness of a Foveon capture is unequalled with any current dSLR including the 16.7 megapixel Canon EOS-1DS Mark II and EOS-5D.

There has always been much controversy over the Foveon/Sigma cameras. Many of the detractors have little or no experience but simply like to talk. The SD9/SD10 cameras produce a file with slightly more measurable resolution in black and white (photography of resolution charts) than a six megapixel non-Foveon camera produces. Color resolution is as good as my Canon EOS-1DS (eleven megapixels).

You're welcome to visit my site where you can see a variety of images taken with the SD10. Click on either of the two Sigma links. Click on the thumbnail images to see a medium resolution image. Click on the medium resolution image to see a 1024x768 resolution image.

http://www.lin-evans.net

Best regards,

Lin
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Old Oct 10, 2005, 8:18 PM   #33
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Lin: thanks for the quick response...if what you say is true, then I find it amusing that all of the dSLR topics for the majors (Canon, Nikon, Oly, KM, Pentax, etc.) are comparing things like noise levels at a given ISO, image quality, and a host of other things, but noise and image quality are the two top complaints when comparing cameras...if I read you right, the Foveon sensor has solved that problem...so, why is it not more popular???

Also, does the Sigma have other quality features, like good autofocus, instant on and no shutter lag, features we look for in other dSLRs???...at the risk of being overly simplistic, how does the Sigma compare to a Nikon D70s, Canon 20D, Oly E1, and cameras in that range???

I notice that they have an interesting power method, a sliding battery holder that can use AA batts or CRV3s...while I may still buy a dSLR with proprietary lith batts, I still like the fact that Pentax uses AA, and now I know that Sigma does, too...

Thanks again


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Old Oct 10, 2005, 11:19 PM   #34
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marsha7 wrote:
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Lin: thanks for the quick response...if what you say is true, then I find it amusing that all of the dSLR topics for the majors (Canon, Nikon, Oly, KM, Pentax, etc.) are comparing things like noise levels at a given ISO, image quality, and a host of other things, but noise and image quality are the two top complaints when comparing cameras...if I read you right, the Foveon sensor has solved that problem...so, why is it not more popular???

Also, does the Sigma have other quality features, like good autofocus, instant on and no shutter lag, features we look for in other dSLRs???...at the risk of being overly simplistic, how does the Sigma compare to a Nikon D70s, Canon 20D, Oly E1, and cameras in that range???

I notice that they have an interesting power method, a sliding battery holder that can use AA batts or CRV3s...while I may still buy a dSLR with proprietary lith batts, I still like the fact that Pentax uses AA, and now I know that Sigma does, too...

Thanks again

Hi Marsha,

Noise levels are quite tolerable on the Sigma SD10 (the SD9 is discontinued) up to ISO 800 with good light. The camera doesn't have low noise at higher ISO's (above ISO 800) like the Canon six and eight megapixel models and doesn't do nearly as well with low light long exposures.

Autofocus is less sophisticated than with many other dSLR's such as the Nikon D70 or Canon 20D in that it only uses one center autofocus point, but as you can see from my examples on my website it's quite adequate for wildlife shots and image quality, in my own experience, is superior to most other dSLR's with conventional sensors. The extreme pixel leve sharpness and zero color moire along with superior dynamic range and great enlargeability make the SD10 ideal for the professional who wants to optimize image quality.

The lack of multiple autofocus points and slower buffer make for a mediocre frame rate so that the camera is really not nearly as good for shooting action sports or for situations where you need long strings of continuous frames. It's necessary to wait on the buffer to clear after around nineframes and this can be problematic for some types of shooting.

In essence - the Sigma's are not for everyone. The user should be competent with software such as PhotoShop and the included SPP softwareto get the most from the RAW images captured with the Foveon sensor. The camera does not have a jpg or tiff mode so allcaptures must be converted from RAW. This doesn't set well with those who want instant out-of-camera frames. For those type users conventional approaches such as Nikon, Canon, Fuji, Olympus or Pentax wouldmake better choices.

The Sigma cameras work best when not using AA batteriesunless you use the optional battery grip (highly recommended) then rechargeable NiMH batteries work very well giving over 800captures per charge. I use the 15 minute RayOVac rechargeables and have been very happy with them.

Shutter lag is essentiallya non issue.It's quite possible to get precisely the frame you want andthe limitation is only your reflex time.

Overall, I find the SD10 to be a superior instrument at a very reasonable price. Sigma has a large quality lens selection and I find myself using my SD10 more and more as my instrument of choice for wildlife photos. I also have five Canon dSLR's ranging variously from 3, 4, 6, 8 and 11 megapixels and a Kodak DCS-760 (six megapixels with Nikon lens mounts). My next dSLR will be the Nikon D2X and perhaps the replacement for the SD10 which hopefully will be available before long.

Best regards,

Lin
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Old Oct 11, 2005, 7:04 AM   #35
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Lin: Thanks again for the feedback...I am a novice, always checking out the dSLRs, learning from people's comments...when the day comes that I move to a dSLR, I am always keeping my eyes open to see what is available, and I had never heard of the Sigma camera line...

The replacement for the SD10 will be interesting to see what they do...:?:?
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