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Old Feb 6, 2005, 12:41 AM   #1
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Well, ahead of the "hare" according to the fable :-)


Actually, another Jon Anderson Fiore Polymer Clay art piece. This turtle is exceptional. The interesting thing about Jon's
pieces are that there is absolutely zero paint used. The Fiore process is amazing. Colored polymer clay is used to create
designs about the size of a large loaf of bread called "canes". The clay is then stretched, then cut in half and the
process is repeated until the designs are the size of tiny coins and smaller. Eventually an Exacto knife is used
to slice the tiny designs like pickle chips. They are then moulded around carved wooden animal frames and fired.
Each piece is unique and no two are alike. Once a "cane" of design is used up a new and different design is created.

The SD10 works very well to capture the subtle colors and texture of these. This "tortise" is about five inches
in length and completely covered with intricate designs, even the bottom of the feet.

SD10 - ISO 100 - Sigma 70-300mm APO @119mm - F22 - .6 second shutter speed with -1.0 exposure compensation
in natural light shade on black velvet.


Click link below to see full size image:

http://www.lin-evans.org/sample/turtlefrontorig.jpg

Or the Fractal Sharpened version for print:

http://www.lin-evans.org/sample/turt...rigfractal.jpg


Last edited by Lin Evans; Feb 1, 2015 at 1:29 PM.
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Old Feb 6, 2005, 8:23 AM   #2
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WOW!!!
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Old Feb 10, 2005, 4:44 PM   #3
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Looks like beeing photos of a poster, but the F22 probably settles that, also, an impressive piece of art.
To me the first is a bit soft, the second far to harsh. ?? I've never seen the output of a 'Fractal' sharpened

image before, but I guess it's optimised after what you see on print, so.. 8)
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Old Feb 10, 2005, 7:23 PM   #4
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Quote:
Looks like beeing photos of a poster, but the F22 probably settles that, also, an impressive piece of art.
To me the first is a bit soft, the second far to harsh. ?? I've never seen the output of a 'Fractal' sharpened

image before, but I guess it's optimised after what you see on print, so.. 8)
Yes, the 70-300 APO isn't the best lens for this type object. Ideally a 180mm macro with F32 would produce both the crispness, working distance and depth of field necessary, but Sigma doesn't make that lens. The next best would be the Sigma 105mm macro which does give F32 and is an excellent lens - unfortunately I don't have one yet. The 70-300 only goes to F22 which leaves a bit to be desired as far as optimal depth of field, but is a fairly good compromise. The first link, to the unsharpened image is about as good as the lens can do considering diffraction issues and DOF issues. Heavy fractal sharpening allows extremely crisp edges which, as you noticed, are a bit harsh for this particular image on screen, but works extremely well for poster sized prints because it counters the normal softening from interpolation. It's best to do the interpolation first, and leave the sharpening as the last step for actual print purposes.

There are numerous ways to sharpen an image and in general no one way is best in all cases. Unsharp Mask is essentially a localized contrast enhancement process which differentially increases contrast at edges and make the image appear sharper since it draws our attention to these edges. Deconvolution algorithms actually move pixels and affect edge roll-off which does true sharpening where out of focus or slight motion blur is the cause of the problem. Fractal algorithms as used by Genuine Fractals (the interpolation and lossless compression tool) actually change edge geometry and can be used along with the Unsharp Mask tool to provide optimal appearance of sharpness, especially for print purposes.

Best regards,

Lin
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