Steve's Digicams Forums

Steve's Digicams Forums (https://forums.steves-digicams.com/)
-   Sony (https://forums.steves-digicams.com/sony-34/)
-   -   [Recovered Thread: 97575] (https://forums.steves-digicams.com/sony-34/%5Brecovered-thread-97575%5D-95246/)

DarkDTSHD Jul 14, 2006 11:59 AM

Hello guys,

I thought it would be a great idea if there was one main thread for anything to do with our experienceswith ourH1cameras. A place whereexperiencedand new users of the H1 can ask questions and have them answered. Make comments. And offer tips for better results.





Tullio Jul 18, 2006 2:45 PM

How's the H1 working for you. Dark? Posted any photos yet???

DarkDTSHD Jul 19, 2006 12:40 AM

Tullio wrote:
Quote:

How's the H1 working for you. Dark? Posted any photos yet???
It's working out great. Walked around my neighborhood. Shot some pics. Just came from a Afro-Brazilian Festival this past weekend downtown by the lakeshore. Shot even more pics. I think roughly 30. Will be attending another festival this coming weekend. This time a Latin themed one. More opportunities. :)

Oh and remember I mentioned something about how after I deleted/copied the 22 files from the internal memory to the memory card the battery level readout read "half-full". That an hour later it read "full" again. You told me my H1 was near "half-full" and that after a few shots it would read "half-full" again? Well, it's still reading "full". Some 40 odd shots later. So, it looks like this is just a part of using NiMH cells.

Something similar happened recently. I was checking some settings. Battery life meter read "half-full". Turned off the camera for a few minutes. Decided to check something else. And it read "full" again. Heh!

I wonder how many pics I'll get before this first charge dies out. Keeping in mind that I'm just using the supplied Sony 2100 mAh cells. Guess I'll find out soon enough. After attending a few more festivals.

Post any pics? No not yet. But will in time.

And just found out that the Costco in Ottawa (near Montreal and several hours drive outside Toronto) is selling the 2500 mAh verisons of Sanyo cells. The guy that posted this information didn't say whether there were also the 2700 mAh variety. Looks like I'll be making a trip to my neighborhood Costco to take a look.

He said a 4-pack/charger ran $24.95 CAD. Not too bad a deal. Though, I hope they sell the Sanyo cells sans charger, as I'm planning to order a Powerex 2700 mAh package deal which includes the 401 charger.

Any how, I've babbled on long enough. Take care dood!



DarkDTSHD Sep 21, 2006 1:49 AM

Another question for H1 owners.

With interchangeable lenses there is always a "sweet spot" in terms of aperture settings. Where images are particularly sharp. What is the "sweet spot" for the fixed lens on the H1? Any one? :)

Thanks in advance!

Tullio Sep 21, 2006 12:08 PM

F4.0 to f5.6. The H1 is calibrated toset the aperture tof4.0 whenever it can when in P mode. Anything beyond f6.3 should cause diffraction (softness around the edges). So, try to avoid very small apertures. With DSLRs, you needvery smallapertures toobtain the greatest DoF (f16 or f22). However, an f2.8 on PaS (fixed lens) cameras is equivalent to f11 DSLR, so f4.0 will give you the same results as f22. No need to go much beyond f5.6, really. Unless, of course, you are photographing a very bright objectand you want to usea slow shutter speed for special effects.Then you have no choice but to reduce the aperture as much as possible (f8.0) or use a ND filter to cut down light.

DarkDTSHD Sep 21, 2006 2:59 PM

Tullio wrote:
Quote:

F4.0 to f5.6. The H1 is calibrated toset the aperture tof4.0 whenever it can when in P
mode. Anything beyond f6.3 should cause diffraction (softness around the edges). So, try to avoid very small apertures. With DSLRs, you needvery smallapertures toobtain the greatest DoF (f16 or f22). However, an f2.8 on PaS (fixed lens) cameras is equivalent to f11 DSLR, so f4.0 will give you the same results as f22. No need to go much beyond f5.6, really. Unless, of course, you are photographing a very bright objectand you want to usea slow shutter speed for special effects.Then you have no choice but to reduce the aperture as much as possible (f8.0) or use a ND filter to cut down light.
Ok thanks dood. Noted. :)

Regarding filters...I am planning to pickup a ND filter. Maybe one from Sigma or Cokin. Which one do you use? Or are you using one?

I'm also considering a CPL filter later. Maybe one from Nikon as they are said to be the most neutral. Compared to those from Hoya, B&W, Tiffen...etc.

And possibly a UV from Cokin. Again later. Or "....when I get around to it".

Cya.



Tullio Sep 21, 2006 6:04 PM

I'd start on a reverse order. The UV should be the first filter to buyif you want to keep the adapter on the camera at all times (which I recommend to keep the lens extention free and protected). It will protect the lens and some will help reduce haze. I have bought many UV filters to see if there was a significant difference between them: Hoya, B&W, Bower, Promaster, Tiffen (I returned itbecause it is cheaply made)and Sigma. The bestIMO is theSigma EX multi-coated, which actually reduced haze significantly. The Hoya, Bowerand B&W are also good but they did not affect haze in any way. The Promaster affected saturation slightly.
style="BACKGROUND-COLOR: #000000"
style="BACKGROUND-COLOR: #000000"Next comes the polarizer. You can save a lot of money by buying a linear pol instead of circular. Despite what you read, the linear pol will work just as well (trust me on this one). This issue regarding the behavior oflinear pol filterswith AFdoes not apply to current AF cameras. I've tested many different brands ofcir/linear pol in different camerasand noticed no difference in behavior between the two types. There are differences in terms of saturation between brands with theHoya cir polproducing the most saturated images of all brands(too much for my taste but if you really want deep blue skies, that's the filter to get). I prefer theTamron linear pol. It's very efficient and produces more natural images.
style="BACKGROUND-COLOR: #000000"
style="BACKGROUND-COLOR: #000000"Then the ND filter. I onlyhave the Sony so I don't know how it compares with other brands. It's a -3 filter and its use is very limited. I use it primarily forshooting water fountains/falls in brightdaylight when I want to create a cottony effect (slow shutter speed). You can't obtain this effectw/o the ND filterbecause f8.0 is not small enough of an apertureso as you slow down the shutter speed, the image becomes totally over exposed (unless you have an ND filter).

DarkDTSHD Sep 21, 2006 7:42 PM

Tullio wrote:
Quote:

I'd start on a reverse order. The UV should be the first filter to buyif you want to keep the adapter on the camera at all times (which I recommend to keep the lens extention free and protected). It will protect the lens and some will help reduce haze. I have bought many UV filters to see if there was a significant difference between them: Hoya, B&W, Bower, Promaster, Tiffen (I returned itbecause it is cheaply made)and Sigma. The bestIMO is theSigma EX multi-coated, which actually reduced haze significantly. The Hoya, Bowerand B&W are also good but they did not affect haze in any way. The Promaster affected saturation slightly.
style="BACKGROUND-COLOR: #000000"
style="BACKGROUND-COLOR: #000000"Next comes the polarizer. You can save a lot of money by buying a linear pol instead of circular. Despite what you read, the linear pol will work just as well (trust me on this one). This issue regarding the behavior oflinear pol filterswith AFdoes not apply to current AF cameras. I've tested many different brands ofcir/linear pol in different camerasand noticed no difference in behavior between the two types. There are differences in terms of saturation between brands with theHoya cir polproducing the most saturated images of all brands (too much for my taste but if you really want deep blue skies, that's the filter to get). I prefer theTamron linear pol. It's very efficient and produces more natural images.
style="BACKGROUND-COLOR: #000000"
style="BACKGROUND-COLOR: #000000"Then the ND filter. I onlyhave the Sony so I don't know how it compares with other brands. It's a -3 filter and its use is very limited. I use it primarily forshooting water fountains/falls in brightdaylight when I want to create a cottony effect (slow shutter speed). You can't obtain this effectw/o the ND filterbecause f8.0 is not small enough of an apertureso as you slow down the shutter speed, the image becomes totally over exposed (unless you have an ND filter).
Hey Tullio,

So you'd recommend a UV before a ND as the filter to keep on our H1's 90% of the time? I assumed a UV would only be good on days when it's a bit hazy. Which isn't often up here in Toronto. On good days it's just bright. So I assumed a ND would have been the way to go.

And as I said I was thinking of getting a Sigma ND filter. Possibly also a SIgma CPL. Linear? hmmmm...

And about the Hoya PL and CPL filters lots of people complain about how they put a green tint on the image. So I think I'll stay away from Hoya. Even though I would like to get the deep blue skies, water.... And probably go with either a Sigma or Nikon. More Nikon as I've heard that they are the most neutral on the forums. Not sure how Sigma's are. Or Cokin's "digital" line of screw-in filters.



Tullio Sep 21, 2006 9:50 PM

The UV is the only filter you can actually keep on the lens at all times because it does not affect exposure in any way. Polarizers will cut 1-1 1/2 fstops so it's good in bright daylight only. Besides, polarizers' primary objective is toreduce glare and reflection, not to protect the lens. It also increases color saturation but you must have side lighting for the effect to be significant. The ND filter cuts the amount of light reaching the camera's sensor. Again, only good in bright daylight (even more so than the pol.). As I mentioned, I really like the Sigma UV EX MC filter. I have a Hoya Moose Warm Polarizer which is also decent and works well on land and seascape photography but makes earth tones over saturated. I'm not familiar with the Nikon filters but I think they cost too much and the cheap ones are not MC. I'd stick with the Sigma if I were you. And yes, you can save some money by buying a linear polarizer. They will work just the same, trust me.

DarkDTSHD Sep 22, 2006 12:24 AM

Tullio wrote:
Quote:

The UV is the only filter you can actually keep on the lens at all times because it does not affect exposure in any way. Polarizers will cut 1-1 1/2 fstops so it's good in bright daylight only. Besides, polarizers' primary objective is toreduce glare and reflection, not to protect the lens. It also increases color saturation but you must have side lighting for the effect to be significant. The ND filter cuts the amount of light reaching the camera's sensor. Again, only good in bright daylight (even more so than the pol.). As I mentioned, I really like the Sigma UV EX MC filter. I have a Hoya Moose Warm Polarizer which is also decent and works well on land and seascape photography but makes earth tones over saturated. I'm not familiar with the Nikon filters but I think they cost too much and the cheap ones are not MC. I'd stick with the Sigma if I were you. And yes, you can save some money by buying a linear polarizer. They will work just the same, trust me.
Ok I see what you're saying now about the filters. Thanks! :)

When I get the chance I'll go look into getting either a Sigma UV or a Nikon. I could have sworn the Nikons are MC. Will have to double check. Then again I don't want to spend too much as it's just for my H1 (and not a DSLR).

About linear PL filters. I'll look into that too when I'm getting my UV.

Have a good weekend Tullio!

Btw...do you shoot solely with the H1? Or do you also shot with a DSLR? And you wouldn't happen to have a pic showing the over saturated earth tones would you? :)

Tullio Sep 22, 2006 2:14 AM

1 Attachment(s)
I don't have a DSLR but I do have a Panasonic FZ20 (5MP 12x zoom) I use some times. I'm looking into buying the new Pentax K100 DSLR. It appears to offer good value for the money. Besides, I have a collection of Pentax lenses from the film SLR days.

Here are two pictures taken with my H1 w/ and w/o the Hoya Moose filter. You can easily see the difference between the two images in terms of color saturation. As I said, this filter works wellwith sky and water but not earth.

WITH HOYA MOOSE WARM POLARIZER FILTER

Tullio Sep 22, 2006 2:15 AM

1 Attachment(s)
WITHOUT THE MOOSE POL FILTER

DarkDTSHD Sep 22, 2006 10:46 AM

Hey Tullio,

Thanks for posting the pics. But to be honest I don't think the "over saturation" is that bad. I was expecting overblown colors. To the point of looking abnormal. But, I actually found the color pleasing. :)

I guess it comes down to what you were intending to do with the photo. What kind of effect. If you were trying to get a shot with accurate colors then the MOOSE filter wouldn't have been a good choice in that instance. But if you purposely wanted rock to have more color...

But, back to UV filters...priced out the filters. Found a shop carrying Hoya and Sigma. They carry the Hoya PRO1 MC ($59.99 CAD) and the regular MC version for ($35.99 CAD). The Sigma MC filter is $44.99 CAD. Have you tried the PRO1 from Hoya? Or know any one that has?

As for the Nikon CPL filter ($139.99 CAD) I haven't been able to find out whether they are MC or SC (single coated) yet. Nikon Canada doesn't even have filters listed. :) But for now it's still on the top of my list.

Tullio Sep 22, 2006 12:56 PM

Dark, you have to analyze the picture as a whole. If you look at the bottom part where there are some plants and flowers, you'll see that the green foliageis not really green. Now, image you have a field of grass...it will certainly not look natural. The good news is, you can always manipulate the image, so if the extra saturation is appealing to you, use the filter most of the time in daylight conditions and then adjust the color to your likingin PS.

Amazon has the Sigma 58mm UVMC EX for $7.95 + s/h. It's a steal (I think it's a mistake because this filter sells anywhere else for $39+). I bought two so I don't need to swap them between the H1 and the FZ20 and I find them awesome. They are made in Japan andthecoating is excellent. Now, I'm not sure how it works for you since you are in Canada. I would never ever pay $100+ for an UV filter. A professional photographer might but I'm not one of them. For that price, it must be MC. I'd not pay $60 for the Hoya PRO either. I've tested every filter I mentioned here (but not the PRO) and to be honest, none of them deteriorated the image a single bit in terms of resolution. So, this idea that you should not have any piece of glass in front of your lens is good in theory but in reality, most good UV filters will not interfere with image quality. Now, coatedvs. non-coated filter is another story. You do want to have a coated UV filter in front of your lens.

DarkDTSHD Sep 22, 2006 5:38 PM


Tullio wrote:
Quote:

Dark, you have to analyze the picture as a whole. If you look at the bottom part where there are some plants and flowers, you'll see that the green foliageis not really green. Now, image you have a field of grass...it will certainly not look natural. The good news is, you can always manipulate the image, so if the extra saturation is appealing to you, use the filter most of the time in daylight conditions and then adjust the color to your likingin PS.

Amazon has the Sigma 58mm UVMC EX for $7.95 + s/h. It's a steal (I think it's a mistake because this filter sells anywhere else for $39+). I bought two so I don't need to swap them between the H1 and the FZ20 and I find them awesome. They are made in Japan andthecoating is excellent. Now, I'm not sure how it works for you since you are in Canada. I would never ever pay $100+ for an UV filter. A professional photographer might but I'm not one of them. For that price, it must be MC. I'd not pay $60 for the Hoya PRO either. I've tested every filter I mentioned here (but not the PRO) and to be honest, none of them deteriorated the image a single bit in terms of resolution. So, this idea that you should not have any piece of glass in front of your lens is good in theory but in reality, most good UV filters will not interfere with image quality. Now, coatedvs. non-coated filter is another story. You do want to have a coated UV filter in front of your lens.
Ummm, I DID look at the entire picture Tullio. :) My comment stands. Then again we're using different monitors. So who knows. On my end the picture with the MOOSE filter just looks like the same picture with a warm tint. Darkened. But the foliage still looks green to me. Just a darker shade. Shrug.

Any how...I'm just looking to buy a UV filter and then later a PL or CPL filter. Again....when ever I get around to it.

As for DSLR's....that Pentax looks like an okay deal. Decent performer for the money. I read the review for your model here on Steve's and on dcresource.com. That and you do have some old Pentax lenses as you said. Might as well make use of them. And it actually still uses AA batteries. Convenient I suppose. You get to use your current stash of batteries too. :)

When I do decide to get a DSLR I think I'll be looking at either a Nikon D80 or D200. Or their replacements. Personally, I've always found the pictures shot by Nikon users to be more detailed and vibrant (than those shot by Canon users, Olympus users...etc.). Keeping in mind I'm talking about pictures viewed off the internet and not actual prints.

Or, I might go with the Canon 30D. I find the colors of images shot by Canon DSLR users to be more true and possibly less sharp (vs. images shot by Nikon users) in general. Which isn't to say I find the images "soft" or not pleasing.

I would have considered the new Canon XTi but the grip is still problematic IMHO. They only rounded it off a little. But it still appears uncomfortable to hold unless you have small hands. I was reading a review and he said he still has to (as he did with the XT) leave his pinky below the grip.

That and I found the XT too plasticy. Cheap build quality. Felt like a toy. :)

I suppose in the end it comes down to what appeals to you more (not that I'd be basing my DSLR purchase solely on those reasons of course). Do you want a true detailed image? Or a detailed image where the colors have a little more pop? To each his own. :)

Time to check on the BBQ. Steak night!! :-)

Kimmer Sep 25, 2006 6:54 PM

As far as batteries go, I am very pleased with my purchase about a year ago from Radio Shack a "15 Minute Charger" which I believe is manufactured by Ray-O-Vac. I am getting very good service from the AA Rechargable Batteries designed to be used with the "15 Minute Charger" with my H1.

DarkDTSHD Sep 26, 2006 12:24 AM

Kimmer wrote:
Quote:

As far as batteries go, I am very pleased with my purchase about a year ago from Radio Shack a "15 Minute Charger" which I believe is manufactured by Ray-O-Vac. I am getting very good service from the AA Rechargable Batteries designed to be used with the "15 Minute Charger" with my H1.
Hello Kimmer,

Welcome to the H1 owners "offical thread". :)

As for 15-minute chargers...sounds good on paper...but is actually not good for the life or performance of the batteries. Better to do a long charge. So for now I'm still using the supplied 6 hr charger from Sony (and the supplied 2100 mAh batteries).

The next charger will be the Maha 401 along with their 2700 mAh Powerex batteries. Supposedly the best combo out there.

Sanyo batteries are good too. And if my neighborhood Costco carries them I'll pick up some 2500 mAh Sanyos first instead. Rather pick them up in-person. Just on the off chance there's a problem.

How many times have you charged your batteries? And roughly how many shots do you get per charge? Curious. I know we all use our cameras differently...but still...



Kimmer Sep 26, 2006 5:44 PM

My understanding is that the batteries used with the 15 Minute Charger are especially designed to be used with this charger.

I'm not one for taking a huge amount of photos in a single day. However, most recently I visited Great Falls National Park in the Washington, DC area and did take approximately 90 photos during that day. I had no problems with battery power

DarkDTSHD Sep 26, 2006 11:53 PM

Kimmer wrote:
Quote:

My understanding is that the batteries used with the 15 Minute Charger are especially designed to be used with this charger.

I'm not one for taking a huge amount of photos in a single day. However, most recently I visited Great Falls National Park in the Washington, DC area and did take approximately 90 photos during that day. I had no problems with battery power
I see. Any ways I was just speaking in general. In general when you're talking about NiMH batteries quick charges are never a good thing for battery life. But, if your batteries are "made for" the 15-minute charger ok. :)

Are they Ratshack's own brand? Or Ray-o-vak batteries? 2500 mAh?

As I mentioned, I'll be getting either some new Powerex 2700 mAh or Sanyo 2500 mAh (at the neighborhood Costco...assuming the one in my area sells them...I heard that the Sanyo's are being sold int he Ottawa location).

If I don't end up ordering the Powerex or the Sanyos within the next month (going on a trip to HK in Nov) I'll just drop into a Sony Store and pick up a 2500 mAh 4-pack.

Btw...on the average, how many shots to you get per charge?

Take it easy. :)

DarkDTSHD Sep 30, 2006 10:58 AM

Tullio,

You mentioned months ago you would be getting Sony 2500 mAh batteries? How did that go? Do you remember approximately how many shots you got per charge (at partial capacity or full) on average? Did you end up getting some 2700 mAh Powerex batteries?

Tullio Sep 30, 2006 3:24 PM

Hi Dark, yes I did get the Sony Stamina 2500 (blue/orange) and I loved them so much that I ended up getting a second set. Now I have 4. They last forever. As you know, I hate to measure battery capacity by the number of pictures you can get out of them. The reason is because there are many factors that contribute to battery consumption (i.e., flash/no flash, LCD vs. EVF, constant changes in camera settings, etc.). So, all I know is that the Sony batteries last a lot longer than the POWEREX 2500, whcih I thought was pretty darn good. I never bought the 2700 and I believe there ae some brands that offer 2900 now.

DarkDTSHD Sep 30, 2006 4:38 PM

Tullio wrote:
Quote:

Hi Dark, yes I did get the Sony Stamina 2500 (blue/orange) and I loved them so much that I ended up getting a second set. Now I have 4. They last forever. As you know, I hate to measure battery capacity by the number of pictures you can get out of them. The reason is because there are many factors that contribute to battery consumption (i.e., flash/no flash, LCD vs. EVF, constant changes in camera settings, etc.). So, all I know is that the Sony batteries last a lot longer than the POWEREX 2500, whcih I thought was pretty darn good. I never bought the 2700 and I believe there ae some brands that offer 2900 now.
Hey Tullio,

You don't like to measure by the number of shots??!! I thought you told me that was one of your passtimes. :)

Any how, the Sony's lasted longer than the Powerex?? I'll be darn. Would definitely save me the trouble of having to order Powerex 2700 mAh. I assumed the Powerex and the Sanyo batteries held the top two spots. At least according to shootouts done by other websites and what I've heard other forum members say. Not saying I'm doubting you there btw.

I'm about to go on a trip in about a month. So, maybe I'll just go buy a Sony 2500 mAh 4-pack if I don't bother with the Powerex or Sanyo. And there are 2900 mAh batteries now? Gotta look into that one now...

Later T.

Tullio Sep 30, 2006 10:30 PM

Dark, I've been pretyy consistent stating that battery consumption can not be measured simply by the number of shots. Those factors I mentioned previously play a big role on how long the batteries will last. Don't get me wrong, the POWEREX 2500 are excellent batteries and they do hold up the charge. I was surprised to see the Sony performance, however. Now, I do not use the Sony charger that came with the H1 but the MAHA charger I bought with the POWEREX. That's also something you must factor in.

DarkDTSHD Oct 18, 2006 6:29 PM

Just received my order of a Powerex 2700 mAh 4-pack today. Ordered them just two days ago from http://www.paulsfinest.com. Who are based in Montreal. They are FAST!! Will likely buy more products from them in the future.

I might buy the new Maha 801 charger later that just came out. Allowing you to charge 8 AA simultaneously. And of course is a "smart charger". Didn't feel like plunking down $90.00 CAD just yet on battery equipment.

Will use the Sony charger to charge them before my trip to HK/China in about two weeks. Will see how long they last after being charged just once. Not being at full-capacity yet.

And, this past weekend, I picked up a Hoya S-HMC UV filter at the Henry's Imaging show here in Toronto. (Henry's is one of the largest camera shops in Toronto next to Vistek)

Oh...Tullio...how long have you had your H1? And roughly how many shots do you think you've taken with yours? Some guy just bought a H1 (and posted here on the Sony forum "H1 blues") probably sometime in September and after roughly 6 weeks his broke down. Ended up buying a new camera.

I'm not too worried about mine. Been happy with the performance so far. Just wondered.

How about you Sintares? How long have you had yours? Shot more than 10k shots? :)

And Tullio...how is the Pentax DSLR purchase idea going? Have you bought it yet?

Later guys.



eR1c Oct 19, 2006 8:21 PM

I've been using 3 different brands of batteries for my Sony H1 -for the past year since I bought my H1.

-I take lot's of photos, photography is a hobby of mine.

I have several sets of Energizer 2500MAH -these are the worst batteries I've possibly ever owned!! -They don't hold a charge. After you charge them fully they begin to lose power immediately. I've literally had these batteries drain within 4 days after a full charge with very minimal photos snapped over that 4 day period.

Second best in my opinion are the Sony's that came w/ our H1's. They hold a charge real well and seem to have the ability to take a lot of photos.

My favorites by far though are the powerex 2700MAH. I bought 4 of these (2 AA sets). They hold a charge and take a phenominal amount of photos. I filled up an entire 1 gig card with 85% photos and 15% video over a several day period on a recent trip to Death Valley. The set of Powerex's were all I needed to use. -They lasted the complete trip. Sadly my Energizers drained w/o ever using them over the course of the time I left and returned from my trip. The Energizers are worthless (in my opinion).

I love the Powerex's so much I purchased some "D", "C", and "AAA" sizes for all of my son's toys and such. -They are pricey (especially the D and C sizes, but over time are a better deal than using disposables in all his battery operated toys).



DarkDTSHD Oct 19, 2006 9:26 PM

eR1c wrote:
Quote:

I've been using 3 different brands of batteries for my Sony H1 -for the past year since I bought my H1.

-I take lot's of photos, photography is a hobby of mine.

I have several sets of Energizer 2500MAH -these are the worst batteries I've possibly ever owned!! -They don't hold a charge. After you charge them fully they begin to lose power immediately. I've literally had these batteries drain within 4 days after a full charge with very minimal photos snapped over that 4 day period.

Second best in my opinion are the Sony's that came w/ our H1's. They hold a charge real well and seem to have the ability to take a lot of photos.

My favorites by far though are the powerex 2700MAH. I bought 4 of these (2 AA sets). They hold a charge and take a phenominal amount of photos. I filled up an entire 1 gig card with 85% photos and 15% video over a several day period on a recent trip to Death Valley. The set of Powerex's were all I needed to use. -They lasted the complete trip. Sadly my Energizers drained w/o ever using them over the course of the time I left and returned from my trip. The Energizers are worthless (in my opinion).

I love the Powerex's so much I purchased some "D", "C", and "AAA" sizes for all of my son's toys and such. -They are pricey (especially the D and C sizes, but over time are a better deal than using disposables in all his battery operated toys).


Hey Eric,

I've read about the Energizers. That's why I've chosen to stay away from them. Eventhough they are probably the easiest to find sold. At least up here in Toronto.

That and they are expensive (up here). Costing more than a Powerex 2700 mAh 4-pack for I think 2300 mAh Engerizers.

About the Powerex 2700 mAh batteries...are you saying you filled roughly 85% of a 1GB card (or roughly 500+ pics) with pics with one charge? Were the batteries at full capacity? And did you use a Maha charger?

And as for a charger...I'll probably be picking up the new Maha 801D (8 battery, AA or AAA charger) later. As I said. But that's probably when I invest in a DSLR "system" (w/ external flash...usually need 4 AA batteries). Which won't be till next summer at the earliest. No rush for me.

I'll post again after my trip to HK/China and tell you all how many shots I got after charging them only once. Just in case some one is curious.



Tullio Oct 26, 2006 7:42 PM

Hi Dark, I bought my H1 early this year (February, I think) and I've taken about 3500-4000 pictures with it. Never had a problem (knock on wood). I still haven't bought the K100d. I missed the boat on the price. I was hoping it would go lower and all of a sudden it went up $40. Now I'm waiting for it to come down again. I'm not in a big hurry, so I can wait!

DarkDTSHD Oct 26, 2006 11:41 PM

Tullio wrote:
Quote:

Hi Dark, I bought my H1 early this year (February, I think) and I've taken about 3500-4000 pictures with it. Never had a problem (knock on wood). I still haven't bought the K100d. I missed the boat on the price. I was hoping it would go lower and all of a sudden it went up $40. Now I'm waiting for it to come down again. I'm not in a big hurry, so I can wait!
February of this year??!! I'll be darn. Thought I was the only one of two that bought their H1's a year late. :) The other being this chap that started the thread "H1 blues". His broke down during his recent I think in September. While on vacation. Bought I think a Pentax compact P&S and then got his H1 fixed this month. Or was it late last month? Shrugs...

Any how, with DSLR's, it's true. There really is no hurry. As new models are always around the corner. And if you have your heart set on this one model...it's price is bound to drop...eventually.

3000+ shots? I'm still just under 200. LOL!! But, I'll change that in about a week when I head off to HK & China (Quanzhou and Shanghai...and surrounding towns). Should provide ample shooting opportunities (not that one has to travel to the other side of the world to get good shots of course...heh).

Right now I'm very happy with my H1. Working with out a hitch. Knock on wood. :) Not that I've used mine that much. But, I do see it's limitations. And am considering a DSLR sometime in 2007. Will it be the newly released Nikon D80? Nikon D200? Or upcoming Canon 40D? Time will tell. But like you...I'm in no hurry at all.

Cheers! :)

Tullio Oct 29, 2006 11:49 AM

I'm sure you will have plenty of photo opportunities during your trip. I agree, the H1 has its limitations (but then again, they all have some limitation, don't they?). I wish the H1 had a higher shutter speed. I find 1/1000 not to be fast enough at times. I also find the manual fosus to be very difficult to use. I'd prefer the ring system (like the FZ20) as opposed to the push button. It usually takes forever for me to find the correct focus spot. The FZ20 definitely out performs the H1 in the area. Not only the ring makes it very easy but it also offers a MF assist which basically performs the AF once you pre manual focus. Very clever. Other than that, I'm pretty happy with its overall performance. AF is fairly quick and very accurate, I like the wheel thing at the front, which makes it very easy to change S/A/E values, the menu is easy to navigate, exposure and color saturation is awesome, etc, etc, etc.

Anyway, have a great trip. I hope you post some pictures when you come back!

Cheers,

Tullio.

DarkDTSHD Oct 29, 2006 2:32 PM

Tullio wrote:
Quote:

I'm sure you will have plenty of photo opportunities during your trip. I agree, the H1 has its limitations (but then again, they all have some limitation, don't they?). I wish the H1 had a higher shutter speed. I find 1/1000 not to be fast enough at times. I also find the manual fosus to be very difficult to use. I'd prefer the ring system (like the FZ20) as opposed to the push button. It usually takes forever for me to find the correct focus spot. The FZ20 definitely out performs the H1 in the area. Not only the ring makes it very easy but it also offers a MF assist which basically performs the AF once you pre manual focus. Very clever. Other than that, I'm pretty happy with its overall performance. AF is fairly quick and very accurate, I like the wheel thing at the front, which makes it very easy to change S/A/E values, the menu is easy to navigate, exposure and color saturation is awesome, etc, etc, etc.

Anyway, have a great trip. I hope you post some pictures when you come back!

Cheers,

Tullio.

Hiya Tullio,

Thanks. I'm sure shooting in HK, Shanghai and Quanzhou will be a blast!! I just hope I get enough sunshine and not get stuck with dark gloomy days. I know the temp over there right now is hovering between 20-30C. Which sounds terrific to me. Just light clothing required! WooHOO!! :)

As for our H1 and it's limitations...I would have liked to have seen RAW support, a hot shoe (even if the builti-in flash is a powerful one),...shutter speed? I think 1/2000 is fine for now for what I've shot (e.g. belly dancing, Brazilian martial arts...etc.). Even then, I used mostly 1/400...which was fast enough to freeze the movements.

More ISO speed....as long as Sony works on a better noise reduction setup. Even the new Sony DSLR isn't the greatest there. When you start using faster ISO speeds. Just like the Nikon's. Could it be that they are using the same chips? Hmmm... (they are).


Any how, as I've said, for the most part I've been very happy with the H1. Good first digital camera IMHO. Can't go wrong. And I do like the fact that it does have a 12x optical zoom.I am now gladI decided to take your advice and pick-up the H1. :)

Take care.


DarkDTSHD Dec 6, 2006 10:34 AM

1 Attachment(s)
Hello guys,

Returned from my trip to HK and mainland China. Was definitely an eye opener. In mainland China I visited Guangzhou, Hangzhou, Suzhou, and Shanghai.

HK, for the most part looked like a new city. With a brand new airport. Very efficient system of trains that take you to/from the airport and 4-5 individual stations around HK. Where you can check-in your luggage. The airport was like a massive shopping galleria. Complete with "moderately priced" shops/restaurants to the hi-end boutique stores and Benz AMG/Ferrari dealerships (e.g. Gucci, Ralph Lauren clothing shops...etc.).

Places I had been to before (been to HK 13x) looked totally different. Most streets, shops and buildings looked new to me. And in the one area I did recognize (my grandparents old area) were replaced with new shops, refaced buildingsand redone sidewalks/roadways. Using tiles similar to what you would seeon the streets of Lisbon, Portugal.

Mainland China...of the 4 places I visited, they all totally blew me away. In terms of the modernization of the cities, urban planning, plasma/LCD TVs all over the place (indoors and outdoors...you actually had to look hard to find CRT TVs...heh), unique street lamps, tons of bright signage, all the gorgeous hotels, subdevelopments....etc.

One of the last things I expected to see in Hangzhou werePorsche/Ferrari dealerships side by side. Or even in Hangzhou period. And, according to the tour guide, they had a Porsche club rally ride with the HK owners in Hangzhou. Obviously, there's quite a market for Porsches...even in mainland China.

I knew Chinawas growing as a world power but till you actually visit you don't truly see it's might. And it's really only in it's infancy. Made Toronto seem "plain" and almost "backward". Did I mention the MAGLEV train that takes you to the Shanghai airport or from the airport to the city center? WHOOOOOA!!! 433 km/h (or approxiamtely 270 mph)!! Now I have a roughidea of what it feels like to ride in a F1 car. :)

What I missed seeing was "old China". Amazingly enough. Old men bikng with massive loads on the back of their bikes. Or using ox carts. Guess I'll have to leave that for my next trip. :-)

As for the pictures I took a little over 400. A record for me for a "single outing". Keeping in mind the majority of the time I was in a tour group. So time wasn't really on my side. Never mind the rain and the dark weather when I was in mainland China. Though, when I was in Guangzhou/Macau there was sun...which was early in my trip. But overall I was fairly happy with the pictures I did get.

My first pair of Powerex 2700 mAh batteries gave me a little over 300 shots with the first charge using my Sony H1's "dumb" charger. Not bad IMHO. Love to see how many shots I will get on average once I get a Maha 801D or S charger and the batteries are at full capacity (after having charged them 3-5 times as recommended).

On a few of my pics I did see some obvious vignetting. I was using a long focal length and there wasn't much light. Perhaps if I raised the ISO to maybe 100 (left the camera on "auto ISO"...likes to stay at ISO 64) and had the aperture wide open. Usually 2.8 or 3.5. Shutter speeds ranged from 1/8s to 1/60s. Here is an example...


Shot at f/3.5, 1/40s, ISO 64 at Xihu Tiandi Park in Hangzhou, China.


DarkDTSHD Dec 6, 2006 10:37 AM

1 Attachment(s)
Another example of vignetting...which is more obvious seen at full resolution (as some of you might already know).

It was fairly dark and it was raining. This pic was taken while I was on a boat ride in a pond just a little ways away from the famousXihu TiandiPark in Hangzhou. A pagoda type structure that I believe was being used as a radio tower.

f/3.5, 1/40s, ISO 64


DarkDTSHD Dec 6, 2006 10:45 AM

1 Attachment(s)
And here is a picture taken while I was walking aroundXihu TiandiPark in Hangzhou...

f/3.5, 1/40s, ISO 64

DarkDTSHD Dec 6, 2006 10:48 AM

1 Attachment(s)
Another pic taken at theXihu TiandiPark...

f/4.0, 1/80s, ISO 64.

DarkDTSHD Dec 6, 2006 10:51 AM

1 Attachment(s)
Also taken inXihu TiandiPark...what it is? I'll have to get back to you guys on that one day. :-)

f/3.2, 1/30s, ISO 64

DarkDTSHD Dec 6, 2006 10:54 AM

1 Attachment(s)
And one more pic from just "down stream" of Xihu Tiandi Park...

f/4.0, 1/60s, ISO 64

Tullio Dec 15, 2006 1:38 AM

Hi Dark,

It sounds like you had a blast over in China. Considering the wheather conditions, your pictures look pretty good. I'm a bit surprised by the vignetting specially on the first shot. Were you using filters or converters? Raising the ISO to 100 or even 200 should definitely help. I usually try to shoot in Av mode at 4.0 (it seems to be the best aperture for the H1 lens), so I adjust the ISO as needed. However, I avoid ISO 400 at any cost. As for the POWEREX 2700 battery life, 300 pics is very good indeed. I guess I'll get myself some, specially if I end up buying the Pentax K100D dSLR.

Cheers,

Tullio.

DarkDTSHD Dec 15, 2006 10:24 AM

Tullio wrote:
Quote:

Hi Dark,

It sounds like you had a blast over in China. Considering the wheather conditions, your pictures look pretty good. I'm a bit surprised by the vignetting specially on the first shot. Were you using filters or converters? Raising the ISO to 100 or even 200 should definitely help. I usually try to shoot in Av mode at 4.0 (it seems to be the best aperture for the H1 lens), so I adjust the ISO as needed. However, I avoid ISO 400 at any cost. As for the POWEREX 2700 battery life, 300 pics is very good indeed. I guess I'll get myself some, specially if I end up buying the Pentax K100D dSLR.

Cheers,

Tullio.
Hello Tullio,

Thanks for the tips! I'll make note of them. And yes I was using a UV filter. Was it the filter? And I will definitely raise the ISO to 100 or 200 next time in similar conditions. I was thinking that actually after I came home to Toronto. When the H1 is set to "Auto ISO" it seemed to always stick to ISO 64 (when I was in mainland China and there was low light).

And I will try to keep shooting at apertures of F4 or greater. Again when possible. Even in low light conditions. Just assumed...low light...therefore aperture should be wide open...shutter speed slow.

About the Powerex 2700's...I was impressed. Especially being that I had only charged them once using the Sony charger. Not using a "smart" charger like the ones from Maha (which I plan to buy). 300 shots is good. Comes close to real world numbers you'd get with some DSLRs. And it will be interesting to see how many I will get once I do pickup a Maha charger and have charged them at least 3x if not 5x.

Take care. :-)

Tullio Dec 15, 2006 9:07 PM

Since you are using filter, are you attaching it to the original lens adapter? If so, I can almost guarantee you that the vignetting is being caused by the filter. The Sony lens adapter is slightly longer than it should be (go figure). So, when you add a filter in front of it, it sits too far from the extended lens, thus the vignetting. Because I bought a Raynox WA converter,which has a 52mm mount, I also bought the Raynox 52mm adapter to prevent vignetting. This adapter is shorter than the original Sony adapter and I have not experience any vignetting with it. You can easily test by removing the adapter/filter and taking some pictures. I doubt you'll see any noaticeable vignetting.

The ideal aperture range for the H1 is between f4.0 and f6.5. Any aperture above f6.5 will cause defraction and images will be very soft (it will almost look like out of focus). I'd sticke to f4.0-5.6 when possible.

Tullio.

DarkDTSHD Dec 15, 2006 11:46 PM

Tullio wrote:
Quote:

Since you are using filter, are you attaching it to the original lens adapter? If so, I can almost guarantee you that the vignetting is being caused by the filter. The Sony lens adapter is slightly longer than it should be (go figure). So, when you add a filter in front of it, it sits too far from the extended lens, thus the vignetting. Because I bought a Raynox WA converter,which has a 52mm mount, I also bought the Raynox 52mm adapter to prevent vignetting. This adapter is shorter than the original Sony adapter and I have not experience any vignetting with it. You can easily test by removing the adapter/filter and taking some pictures. I doubt you'll see any noaticeable vignetting.

The ideal aperture range for the H1 is between f4.0 and f6.5. Any aperture above f6.5 will cause defraction and images will be very soft (it will almost look like out of focus). I'd sticke to f4.0-5.6 when possible.

Tullio.
Well to answer your first question...Yes I am using the Sony adpater. And why Sony would offer an adpater with this design...knowing users would get vignetting...who knows. :mad:

So basically you're saying that if we use the Sony adapter vignetting will be unavoidable? I mean, I haven't noticed any yet in situations where there is tons of light (e.g. sunshine). Or even moderate amount of daylight. It's only been when it's dark and gloomy have I spotted it. Even then in rare ocations. 95% of my shots taken during my stay in mainland China were good.

Will I buy a Raynox adpater/filter at this point? Also doubtful as I am planning on picking up my first DSLR sometime in 2007. But I "never say never" either.

I wonder if there's a Raynox dealer in Toronto...hmmmm...




All times are GMT -5. The time now is 4:23 AM.