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Old Sep 28, 2006, 5:53 PM   #1
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I want to know if someone has experience storing lenses and cameras in self storage for long periods of time (lets say one month or two). What precautions must one take?
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Old Sep 28, 2006, 5:57 PM   #2
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I would not chance it unless it was climate controlled.
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Old Sep 28, 2006, 10:07 PM   #3
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maxxum7d wrote:
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I want to know if someone has experience storing lenses and cameras in self storage for long periods of time (lets say one month or two). What precautions must one take?
Besides climate control, make sure you take steps to keep the stuff dry. In most cases a heated environment might suffice, but pack some desicant with the equipment. It might help in the event power and heat is lost.

Why can't you just take itwith you?






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Old Sep 29, 2006, 9:13 AM   #4
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rent a helium balloon kit

put the camera in a plastic bag with a packet of silica gell (desicant)

fill the bag with helium (to displace oxygen and moisture) then seal it

(can also use nitrogen but the bottle/regulator is huge)

store as long as you like
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Old Sep 29, 2006, 9:32 AM   #5
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bernabeu wrote:
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rent a helium balloon kit

put the camera in a plastic bag with a packet of silica gell (desicant)

fill the bag with helium (to displace oxygen and moisture) then seal it

(can also use nitrogen but the bottle/regulator is huge)

store as long as you like
You just gave me an idea. I'll bet you can also use one of those vacuum foodsavers to take out all the air and seal it in a vaccum. Could throw in a bag of dessicant just as an added measure but since it is in a vaccum it is probably not required.

I have also used those bags to keep things dry during outdoor excursions like camping and boating. They are useful for more than just food



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Old Sep 29, 2006, 11:05 AM   #6
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I cannot take it with me because this is New York and carrying lenses worth 2000 bucks and expensive cameras around when living in motels and youth hostels is not a good idea.

I haven't been able to find a place to live in, so my only option right now is to crash in at random places for a month while I look for apartments.

Gozinta wrote:
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maxxum7d wrote:
Quote:
I want to know if someone has experience storing lenses and cameras in self storage for long periods of time (lets say one month or two). What precautions must one take?
Besides climate control, make sure you take steps to keep the stuff dry. In most cases a heated environment might suffice, but pack some desicant with the equipment. It might help in the event power and heat is lost.

Why can't you just take itwith you?





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Old Oct 1, 2006, 12:56 AM   #7
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I wouldn't suggest the vacuum-seal food storage bags without careful experimentation first. Creating a partial vacuum inside the bag will cause it to exert some force upon the lens when the plastic bag contracts, so ensure that both end caps are installed to prevent contact with lens elements or damage to pins, rings, etc. Also, since high-quality optics are frequently purged with nitrogen or inert gas, I'm not sure if this low-pressure envelope won't draw out these gases. And as a last note, I would stress that these bags do not truly create a vacuum (such as you would find in a rigid container that had all molecules of air evacuated) but rather they remove most of the air by allowing external air pressure to compress a plastic film around the entire item. This does not remove air molecules like a true vacuum, but creates pockets of low-pressure air (such as in the space between the caps and the outermost elements) which may still contain moisture. And since these pockets are isolated by the clinging plastic film, even adding a dessicant won't remove moisture anywhere but in immediate contact with the packet. I would instead suggest that natural air circulation in a rigid enclosure (with a dessicant packet if desired) would be a better solution.

Or I'm just paranoid with my lenses.
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