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Old Oct 26, 2006, 10:18 PM   #11
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well i looked at the 30 1.4 cause its a fast lens and that extra light should give the camera a faster focus and also 30 is closer to a standard 50 lens (in film)which is normal eye view angle

but then again i was looking at the sigma 18-50 2.8 an wondered if this will serve me in low light and also give me an extra in landscape

i'm looking for a lens to use indoors an at night outside

the 28 on the tamaron is not bad for taking landscape, for if i am in a position where the lens is not wide enough for the shot, i will pan and take 2 shots then later stich them together on the computer.
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Old Oct 26, 2006, 10:46 PM   #12
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At night outside, huh?

That can be tough, depending on the conditons.

I'd personally go for a brighter prime. You can always stop down the aperture a bit for better sharpness and depth of field if needed if light is good enough with a brighter lens.

But, if light is poor, you're stuck with f/2.8 with a zoom, and as tmoreau pointed out, f/2.8 isn't that much brighter than you already have with your 28-300mm if you stay on it's wider end.

As for indoors, if light gets real low (as in many home interiors at night), f/2.8 really won't cut it either without a flash if your subjects are moving much (depending on the percentage of keepers you want to get). Sometimes, I'll try to get away with it though (mostly using my Tamron 20-40mm f/2.7-3.5). I sometimes do that with my Tamron 35-105mm f/2.8, also. But, a prime is my preferred lens for low light.

If light is too low for one, you could always use a flash, though (and use a smaller aperture for better sharpness and depth of field compared to trying to shoot at wide open apertures with a zoom. Most lenses are not as sharp wide open anyway.

As for the Sigma 18-50mm f/2.8, reports I've seen have been a bit mixed on it... with a few too many reports of Backfocus on it's wide end for me to risk buying one for a KM DSLR. I haven't used one myself though, so I wouldn't rule out that the problems I saw reported were due to user error.

You can find some reviews of it here:

http://www.dyxum.com/reviews/lenses/...asp?IDLens=193

If you're not in a hurry and decide to go with an f/2.8 zoom, you may also want to take a look at the new Tamron 17-50mm f/2.8

B&H can send you an e-mail when they get them in.

Tamron 17-50mm f/2.8 at B&H

There really isn't a right or wrong choice. Any lens choice is a compromise in one area or another. So, you just have to decide what's more important for the types of shots you want to take more often with it (looking at focal range, brightness, etc.).

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Old Oct 26, 2006, 11:58 PM   #13
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thanks for the help so far

one thing i forgot to mention is i also like to pack light, i.e with as little as possible.

i am now wondering if i should just invest in a flash like the 3600 hsd, but then that washes out the ambient light which caughtmy eye the first time.
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Old Oct 27, 2006, 10:22 AM   #14
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A flash is always a good thing to have available to you.

In some low light conditions, you're going to need one, no matter how bright your lens is. ;-) Ditto for a tripod (anti-shake has it's limits).

As a general rule, you can get better photos in many conditions by bouncing a flash, versus trying to use existing light, for a variety of reasons (more even lighting, lower noise levels thanks to lower ISO speeds, greater depth of field because you can use smaller apertures allowing you to get more of a scene in focus if desired, less motion blur from subject movement or camera shake, sharper photos because most lenses are not as sharp at wider apertures, and more).

Sometimes you can't use a flash though, or you don't want to use one for a variety of reasons, especially since it can be distracting to your subjects (not to mention irritating to some, too). So, a brighter prime or two can come in very handy. A flash also has a limited range.
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Old Oct 31, 2006, 5:31 PM   #15
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JimC wrote:
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A flash is always a good thing to have available to you.

In some low light conditions, you're going to need one, no matter how bright your lens is. ;-) Ditto for a tripod (anti-shake has it's limits).

As a general rule, you can get better photos in many conditions by bouncing a flash, versus trying to use existing light, for a variety of reasons (more even lighting, lower noise levels thanks to lower ISO speeds, greater depth of field because you can use smaller apertures allowing you to get more of a scene in focus if desired, less motion blur from subject movement or camera shake, sharper photos because most lenses are not as sharp at wider apertures, and more).

Sometimes you can't use a flash though, or you don't want to use one for a variety of reasons, especially since it can be distracting to your subjects (not to mention irritating to some, too). So, a brighter prime or two can come in very handy. A flash also has a limited range.
i agree with jim. a flash is always a good thing to have in your bag. it's the first thing i bought when i purchased my 5d (i bought it before i bought the camera). it opens up a whole bunch of options. granted it won't replace a bright quality lens, but you can look at it the other way too... a bright quality lens cannot replace the options you'd have if you had a flash available.

~aloha~
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Old Oct 31, 2006, 5:58 PM   #16
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50mm f1.7 w/ Hoya circular polarizer (hand held):



Last edited by bernabeu; Jun 27, 2015 at 4:24 PM.
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Old Oct 31, 2006, 11:18 PM   #17
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thanks a lot guys, i have decided to buy the 3600 hsd flash and the sigma 30 1.4 lens , i feel this will go well with my 5d and 28-300 zoom
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Old Nov 8, 2006, 4:46 PM   #18
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I have recently bought a Sony HVLF3600 flash gun and tested it properly for the first time last week (KM 5D with 24mm prime lens).

With 3600 flash (taken at 2:30pm);





Without, using flip-up flash (taken at 3.20pm)







The difference is outstanding, so glad I bought the flash.

I put in the times the pictures were taken as light is darkening so much quicker in the afternooon now so not sure if that makes a difference.






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Old Nov 14, 2006, 11:16 AM   #19
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Juzzie wrote:
Quote:
I have recently bought a Sony HVLF3600 flash gun and tested it properly for the first time last week (KM 5D with 24mm prime lens).

With 3600 flash (taken at 2:30pm);





Without, using flip-up flash (taken at 3.20pm)







The difference is outstanding, so glad I bought the flash.

I put in the times the pictures were taken as light is darkening so much quicker in the afternooon now so not sure if that makes a difference.





wow. that gixer looks nice! i often long for another bike, but the wife would probably change out all the locks should i bring one home :lol:.

the photo is very nicely exposed - which isn't very easy to do with KM and flash photography put together. you mind sharing your camera settings for the shot? i find i have the highest success rate leaving my 5d on aperature priority and setting it to f/8. if i try and mess around with it too much, it really under or over exposes the snot out of my shots.

any secrets or tips you're willing to share would be greatly appreciated!

~aloha~
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Old Nov 15, 2006, 10:50 PM   #20
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When you buy the Sigma 30mm f1.4, let me know where you found it.

I've always been an available light photographer and have been wanting a bright lens for my 5D. I've beenlooking for the Sigma, but while many retailers advertise it, I can't find anyone that has it in stock.
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