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Old Nov 8, 2006, 9:31 PM   #1
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is there a logical reason why there is a off and on button,


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Old Nov 8, 2006, 9:35 PM   #2
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The only one I've heard of is when your using a tripod with long shutter speeds.
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Old Nov 8, 2006, 9:37 PM   #3
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I've never seen it proven or disproven, but the general consensus is that using Anti-Shake with a steady tripod can introduce blur (because of some type of feedback loop where the camera is trying to compensate for movement that isn't there).

Also, anytime you move a CCD (or optical elements in the case of stabilized lenses), you risk photos that may not be as sharp as you'd get without this added movement.

So, if you're shooting at faster shutter speeds (or using a steady tripod), you can turn it off.

Battery drain probably enters into it also (it's going to pull some amount of "juice" with it on. Heat could be another factor (noise is going to be higher with a higher sensor temperature, and the CCD movement from anti-shake probably contributes to it).

Yet another factor is flash sync speed. You've got a sync speed of 1/125 second with anti-shake enabled. But, you've got a sync speed of 1/160 second with it turned off. So, if you're using the internal flash (or don't want to lose power with a KM strobe that has HSS available after exceeding the sync speed), it may be a good idea to leave it off in some conditions.

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Old Nov 9, 2006, 1:52 PM   #4
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Panning the camera is an interesting variation. I am pretty sure the anti-shake sensors are actually measuringacceleration since, if I do it very smoothly and for long enough I can pan with the LEDs showing amost no shake.

In the real world, of course, what I am tryingto photograph never moves that smoothly so the anti-shake is at or nearly at the max and is making things worse. So I turn it off.




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Old Nov 9, 2006, 2:49 PM   #5
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Just thought I'd chime in...if you listen closely you can actually hear it working. For my battery's sake I leave it off unless I'm in low-light situations.
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Old Nov 9, 2006, 9:50 PM   #6
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thanks for the replies, i wonder now if having it on all the time, contributed to my lack of sharpness
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Old Nov 9, 2006, 11:48 PM   #7
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dafiryde wrote:
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thanks for the replies, i wonder now if having it on all the time, contributed to my lack of sharpness
If the shots were handheld it shouldn't make them softer. Are you referring to shots taken on a tripod?
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Old Nov 10, 2006, 8:15 AM   #8
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I'm thinking about turning mine off, too. Whenever I take snapshots of moving subjects in the dark without a flash or tripod, I get a high percentage of images with motion blur when I leave it turned on.

I took a bunch of snapshots around a campfire over the weekend, and only about one out of three were really usable without too much motion blur using a fast 1/10 second shutter speed. That's just not acceptable.

Shouldn't anti-shake be helping out with this kind of blur?

Heck, I even shot Shutter Priority at 1/10 second using ISO 3200 to make sure my shutter speed was plenty fast (even if I needed to underexpose to get it), using a campfire to provide the light. This was cropped out of a larger image before downsizing so you can see the blur (note the hand). My AS must not be working right. :-)

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Old Nov 10, 2006, 8:39 AM   #9
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You can see it in this one, too. See the blur in the hands? This was cropped out of another snapshot and downsized so that you can see the blur.

I probably didn't get more than a dozen photos without this kind of blur of people around a campfire at night, even though my shutter speed was a speedy 1/10 second shooting at ISO 3200 with my 24-85mm f/3.5-4.5, using wider apertures like f/4 or f/4.5, and I left my anti-shake turned on.

Should I send it in to Sony for service so they can fix it?

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Old Nov 10, 2006, 8:46 AM   #10
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JimC:

If it was a problem with the AS or sensor, wouldn't the entire frame be blurred? Since AS counters CAMERA MOVEMENT, not subject movement, is it possible a 1/10 shutter speed was too slow?

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