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Old Jan 1, 2007, 7:27 AM   #1
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I'm a rookie when it comes to using digital cameras.

I'm running into problems when shooting close-ups where part of the subject is reflective. I've tried direct flash, bounce flash, various clip-on flash diffusers and incandescent light to illuminate the subject. Shooting the top of a AA battery illustrates the problem (see attachment).

Can anybody offer help on the cause(s) and cure(s) of this problem?

Happy New Year to you all!

FrankD
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Old Jan 1, 2007, 12:24 PM   #2
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You're overexposing it causing blown highlights.

What was your setup for the shot? The EXIF shows flash wasn' t used with a 1/4 second exposure using Auto (although if you use a third non-dedicated flash, the EXIF won't reflect that).

Give us more info on your setup. But, from outward appearances, you're just overexposing the shot. Use a different mode for one thing. Then, use Exposure Compensation so that you're not overexposing the image. A -EV setting will give you a darker exposure.

If you're using a third party non-dedicated flash with manual settings, use a smaller aperture on the camera (higher f/stop number) if it's overexposing with it's settings. Or, if the issue is too much ambient light (I couldn't help but notice the long 1/4 second shutter), use a faster shutter speed with manual exposure if you want the same aperture that Auto used.

I can't tell why the overexposure existed from the info you gave us, since the EXIF shows no flash was used. Did you use one for this shot or not?

Use of Spot Metering probably contributed to the problem, too. If you meter on a darker portion of a subject, it's going to try and brighten it too much, causing more overexposure. With shutter speeds that slow, metering is not going to be reliable anyway.

Use Exposure Compensation if it's overexposing (or just use manual exposure and dial in settings that work, using the blinking highlights in your histogram as a guide to eliminate hot spots (blown highlights will blink).



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Old Jan 1, 2007, 3:33 PM   #3
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Hi JimC,



Thank you for your feedback. I was wondering about overexposure. For this particular shot I used a halogen desk light for illumination, spot metered on the positive terminal of the battery which resulted in an exposure of ¼ sec and f/5.6 @ ISO 100. The histogram looked okay with nothing showing at maximum brightness. I do use dedicated flash; both the pop-up flash and external dedicated flash units (5600HS and 3600HS) with similar results. I have also tried exposure compensation all the way to –2 EV and still didn't get satisfactory results.



Perhaps my meter is misbehaving.



I'll try your suggestion and use manual mode.



Thanks,



--FrankD
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Old Jan 1, 2007, 9:25 PM   #4
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Happy new year Jim

Thanks for all your enlightened advices



Andy
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Old Jan 3, 2007, 10:12 PM   #5
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Hello,



I hope that you folks don't think that I spend all of my time taking pictures of batteries! However, I did take up JimC's suggestion of using manual mode to try different exposure settings. Yes, it is possible to get a better rendition of the reflective surface but the effect is still there and the rest of the subject is way under exposed. Is this an impossible situation?

I have noticed that this effect only seems to occur in macro (close to 1:1) shots. I have tried some other tests on shiny metallic surfaces at greater distances with acceptable results.

Has anybody else run into this problem?



Regards,



--FrankD
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Old Jan 3, 2007, 10:49 PM   #6
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Hey Frank

Have you tried using a soft box and/or a difusser to soften the light?
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Old Jan 5, 2007, 1:07 PM   #7
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close up the apperature and lengthen the exposure using a tripod with low light
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Old Jan 5, 2007, 1:15 PM   #8
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the battery was with only existing ceiling fan light...





this one is with a piece of milk white ceiling light plastic held above to diffuse the light
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Old Jan 5, 2007, 2:45 PM   #9
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IF ANY REFLECTIONS ARE STILL A PROBLEM DULLING SPRAY IS YOUR FRIEND.......HAIRSPRAY WORKS OK TOO
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Old Jan 5, 2007, 3:04 PM   #10
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OR LET THE ITEM PROVIDE THE LIGHT
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