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Old May 22, 2007, 8:26 PM   #1
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I want to do some specialty photography with my Minolta Maxxum 5D. I need a flash but it needs a special configuration.

Is ther a source where I can find the pinout and functionl description of the hotshoe signals, as well as some timing diagrams.

I can probably figure it out myself, but time is of the essence.

Thanks
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Old May 23, 2007, 8:14 AM   #2
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What are you trying to do?

The hotshoe design is proprietary. But, you can get an adapter to give it an ISO standard shoe that would let you use a number of other flash/strobe solutions.

If you really want the details on the rest of it, there is a project underway to allow older Minolta flash units (for example, Maxxum 5400HS) that have this proprietary shoe to work on newer digital cameras, and there is more info on a couple of sites that yoiu may find useful.

See this forum thread for details on the flash protocol, worked performed so far, and more.

http://www.dyxum.com/dforum/forum_posts.asp?TID=8297

But, for non-Minolta flash setups, you're probably better off using one of the existing third party adapters to give your 5D an ISO standard hotshoe or PC Sync Port, unless you're trying to engineer some kind of elaborate solution that really needs the other data being used by the proprietary shoe. There is a vendor in Hong Kong that sells them for about $16. I've got one of them for use on my 5D (I use it to trigger two different Sunpaks).

It does not have any voltage protection built in (and the hotshoe is designed for strobes at TTL level). So, make sure to use a Wein Safe Sync or equivalent adapter with it if you plan on using strobes with higher trigger voltages. I don't bother using any protection with my two Sunpaks (222 Auto, 333 Auto), and they work fine with my 5D using this adapter's hotshoe or PC Sync Port. But, they have a relatively low trigger voltage.

http://www.gadgetinfinity.com/produc...275&page=1


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Old May 23, 2007, 3:06 PM   #3
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Thanks for the information, it looks quite useful.

The project involves snaking a flash source(s) into tight spaces. The problem is that we have tried fiber optic light pipes attached to a flash and they seem to do some of what we need, but a more omni-directional source would be much better. Also, a better light source would allow for autofocus and autoexposure.

What we are thinking about is a white LED as the light source. If we can add some control to the source, it would be great! It also seems that since the entire system can be TTL compatible, and the LEDs are low voltage as well as relatively instantaneous in response we will need to use delays to compensate. The recycle time for the flash is also instantaneous.

Although the "white" LED has a blue component to it, slight modifications in the editing software eliminates that with no problem.

If anyone else has additional information I would appreciate it.

I will post what we find at this end.

Thanks Again
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Old May 23, 2007, 3:27 PM   #4
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Quote:
... entire system can be TTL compatible,
Not really. ;-)

With Digital, the reflective characterstics of the sensors make them unsuitable for off the sensor metering during a flash exposure (the way you could do with off the film metering).

As a result, most digital cameras use a preflash (or more accurately, a series of preflashes) to help judge the length of the main flash burst needed, using complex algorithms in the camera that take advantage of information like focus point, focus distance, metering mode, amount of reflected light from the preflash that the metering sensors see, and more. That's one reason most manufacturer's flash systems were redesigned for digital.

Even with all of this info, getting consistent exposure can be a challenge. Heck, some of the third party flash manufacturers *still* can't seem to get it right (even when their flash model is designed for the cameras).

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