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Old Jul 3, 2007, 10:22 PM   #1
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Used the Alpha A100+Tamron 17-50mm to capture some images of rain soaked flowers. I've seen some fantastic shots on this subject. If anyone knows how to do this properly I'd like to hear from you.
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Old Jul 4, 2007, 12:42 AM   #2
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FrankD,

Good effort on this one. What time did you shoot this? The sun's light appears to be harsh and it made the flower look hard (for lack of a better term). The best time to shoot flowers will be early in the morning or late in the afternoon, with the sun softly lighting the flowers from an angle, rather than straight-on. Be mindful of other sources of shadows as well.

Rather than shooting immediately after the rain, you might want to try waiting an hour or two for some of the water to run off. A few drops of water or dew is better than the flower looking drowned.

What else? Flowers are great subjects to use with narrow depths-of-field. A sharply focused flower in the middle of blurred leaves or other flowers is a great way to highlight your subject. Plus, using narrow depths-of-field means you'll be maximizing your aperture. Faster apertures = faster shutter speeds. Lessening the likelihood of the wind suddenly picking up and blowing the flowers out-of-focus. :-)

-Don
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Old Jul 4, 2007, 7:57 PM   #3
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donm wrote:
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FrankD,

Good effort on this one. What time did you shoot this? The sun's light appears to be harsh and it made the flower look hard (for lack of a better term). The best time to shoot flowers will be early in the morning or late in the afternoon, with the sun softly lighting the flowers from an angle, rather than straight-on. Be mindful of other sources of shadows as well.

Rather than shooting immediately after the rain, you might want to try waiting an hour or two for some of the water to run off. A few drops of water or dew is better than the flower looking drowned.

What else? Flowers are great subjects to use with narrow depths-of-field. A sharply focused flower in the middle of blurred leaves or other flowers is a great way to highlight your subject. Plus, using narrow depths-of-field means you'll be maximizing your aperture. Faster apertures = faster shutter speeds. Lessening the likelihood of the wind suddenly picking up and blowing the flowers out-of-focus. :-)

-Don
Hi Don,

Thanks for the feedback. This shot was taken late afternoon, shortley after a rain shower.

I've seen images where the water droplets look so real that you would think that the picture was wet! That's the effect I'm looking for but have never accomplished. Your point about lighting angle is well taken. I should get a spray bottle and go and practice in different lighting situations.

--Frank



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Old Jul 5, 2007, 12:17 AM   #4
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Hi Frank,

Here are a couple of shots that I took a while back. I had my 50mm on my 5D and was too lazy to change my lens. So the images here are cropped and lost some detail. But you should still be able to see the water droplets. When photographing flowers, I usually use my other lens which has macro feature at its 135 length. The third image is a sample taken with that lens - no droplets though as they were taken at a different time.

-Don






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Old Jul 6, 2007, 5:40 AM   #5
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Don,

Thanks for the pictures. Nice work.

--Frank
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Old Jul 13, 2007, 9:28 AM   #6
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Here are a couple of shots that I took a while back. I had my 70-210mm on my 7D
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Old Jul 13, 2007, 10:01 PM   #7
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FrankD wrote:
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Hi Don,

Thanks for the feedback. This shot was taken late afternoon, shortley after a rain shower.

I've seen images where the water droplets look so real that you would think that the picture was wet! That's the effect I'm looking for but have never accomplished. Your point about lighting angle is well taken. I should get a spray bottle and go and practice in different lighting situations.

--Frank


Aloha Frank~

I was just wondering if angling off on the flower would give a better "feel" of the dew/raindrops on the flower.... I'm thinking this because by shooting at an angle, the water droplets wouldn't be shot head on, and the dome shape of the drops would be captured on the image... not sure if it makes sense - Donn's rose images illustrate what i'm getting at nicely.

Just my very humble (and inexperienced) opinion :G

aloha
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Old Jul 14, 2007, 7:15 AM   #8
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Hawaii Built wrote:
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Aloha Frank~

I was just wondering if angling off on the flower would give a better "feel" of the dew/raindrops on the flower.... I'm thinking this because by shooting at an angle, the water droplets wouldn't be shot head on, and the dome shape of the drops would be captured on the image... not sure if it makes sense - Donn's rose images illustrate what i'm getting at nicely.

Just my very humble (and inexperienced) opinion :G

aloha
Hello Hawaii Built,

Thanks for the suggestion - it's a good idea and certainly worth a try. Angling the camera means using a smaller aperture to keep the entire flower head in focus. The smaller aperture will cause a corresponding reduction in shutter speed increasing the potential for subject motion. It seems to me that the wind always picks up whenever I try to shoot flowers! :?

I'll give it a try and post a sample if I get anything worthwhile. How about you? You live in a tropical paradise with flowers everywhere! :-)

--Frank

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Old Jul 18, 2007, 11:19 PM   #9
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Howzit Frank~

It was a nice day today, so I grabbed my 5D and headed outside. I have a small anthurium patch that I grow flowers in, so I walked around a bit and snapped these. No rain and the sun was going down. I didn't bother cropping as there was yardwork to be done :-)







Taken with your garden variety 75-300 4.5-5.6 D. That lens has not left my bag for a long time. Thought it a good day to give it a whirl.

aloha
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Old Jul 19, 2007, 7:03 AM   #10
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Hawaii Built wrote:
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Howzit Frank~

It was a nice day today, so I grabbed my 5D and headed outside. I have a small anthurium patch that I grow flowers in, so I walked around a bit and snapped these. No rain and the sun was going down. I didn't bother cropping as there was yardwork to be done :-)


Taken with your garden variety 75-300 4.5-5.6 D. That lens has not left my bag for a long time. Thought it a good day to give it a whirl.

aloha
Hello Hawaii Built,

Nice shots! I really like #3.

--Frank
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