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Old Aug 31, 2007, 1:47 PM   #31
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ugly_giddy wrote:
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i dont find it diff to shoot in a cloudy situation. most of the times io got it right.
That's because the clouds act as one big "soft box", diffusing the light. You get more even lighting, without a huge difference between bright and dark in the image.

That difference between bright and dark is where the problem comes in. The camera is much more sensitive to differences compared to the human eye, and is not able to capture the range of bright to dark that you can see.

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Old Aug 31, 2007, 1:54 PM   #32
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im really beginning to understand now.:Gi just need some practice and get some experience so that everything i do would be instinctive.

thanks alot!
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Old Aug 31, 2007, 10:13 PM   #33
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ugly_giddy wrote:
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... btw, in using the histogram, do u just recompose ur shot to get rid of the flashing indicators? for example, u want to shot a subject @ f8 @ 35mm and then u get 1/60, iso 100 and then u get the flasing indicators on ur cam histogram after the shot. so do i need to change aper and shut, take the shot until i get less or no flashing indicator on the histogram?
I am sure there are at least thirtyseven and a half different ways of dealing with the histogram. What I do is shoot at auto/aperature priortiy/whatever mode and look at the histogram as I switch to manual. If the histogram indicates that the exposure is spot on (real frequently it is), I just use the manual settings the automagical camera found. If it is underexposed, I open the lens or slow the shutter.

Shoot, adjust, shoot, adjust, ... and you will have it dialed in for that situation.

Almost quicker to do than to describe.
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Old Aug 31, 2007, 11:12 PM   #34
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Another thing you can do is bracket your exposures. IOW, take the same photo more than one way. Take it the way the camera's metering thinks it needs to be taken, and also shoot it both brighter and darker. That way, you can select the best photo as a starting point later on.

Your camera actually has an exposure bracketing feature if you want to use it. But, I typically do that kind of thing manually.

If your subject is stationary (versus people), you can also blend more than one exposure together to help out with high dynamic range scenes (where you have a lot of difference between brighter and darker areas). Here is one article on the subject:

http://www.luminous-landscape.com/tu...blending.shtml

Here's an older one:

http://www.luminous-landscape.com/tu...xposures.shtml

It's not uncommon for me to take dozens of photos of the exact same subject using different settings if time permits (using the histogram and blinking shadows/highlights features to help out), while making adjustments that I think are going to give me the best chance at a good image (adjusting exposure, focal length, focus point, aperture (that impacts depth of field), composition and more.

Heck, I probably took 50 images of the same tree limbs a couple of weeks ago, rotating the camera a variety of ways, using a variety of exposure and aperture settings and more (and waiting for the sun and clouds to be where I thought the image looked better). I liked the way the moss was hanging down from a tree in a partly cloudy blue sky, and decided to try and capture it in the best way my limited creativity allows (from my persective, my wife is the real photographer in the family, and her eye is much better than mine). She also paints.

I understand more of the technical stuff. But, she's got the better eye for composition (which is the more important part). lol I do that kind of thing pretty often (take lots and lots of shots of the same subject). Memory Card space is pretty inexpensive anymore.

With non-stationary subjects, you may not have that luxury (taking lots of shots of the same subject in a variety of ways). So, you'll need to become more aware of your camera's metering behavior for best results, so that you can make adjustments based on experience with it instead (which you'll get better at over time).

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Old Sep 6, 2007, 1:17 PM   #35
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when u look at histogram after a shot, what do u need to look at or be aware of? does the graph needs to be in the middle? the graph should not be on either side?:?or whta should be the histogram reading for a correct or acceptable exposure?

thanks a lot!!
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Old Sep 6, 2007, 1:25 PM   #36
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It depends on what you're shooting. You may have a lot of lighter areas in a scene with more on the right, or a lot of darker areas in a scene with more on the left.

As a general rule, you want to try to keep the main part of a scene with lots of mid range tones a bit right of center (provided you're not blowing any highlights you want that way). Here's one article on Histograms:

Understanding Histograms

But, if you use the playback feature and watch for blinking highlights (areas that were exposed too bright to retain any detail) and shadows (areas that were exposed too dark to retain any detail), you can get a pretty good feel for how much exposure compensation is needed to achieve what you want pretty fast with practice, without understanding all of the nuances associated with histograms.


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Old Sep 6, 2007, 3:01 PM   #37
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thanks for the site! very informative. i book mark it 4 future ref.
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