Go Back   Steve's Digicams Forums > Digital SLR and Interchangeable Lens Cameras > Sony Alpha dSLR / Konica Minolta dSLR, Sony SLT

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old Mar 5, 2008, 9:33 AM   #1
Junior Member
 
Ordview's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Posts: 25
Default

Does anyone know why accessing the ISO 3200 capability on the 7D is a separate menu item rather than just being part of the regular ISO selections. That is to say - why do we have the option of having ISO 100-1600 and have to select ISO 100-3200 as a separate choice? Seems to me that we would all just choose the latter and ignore the former unless there is a reason for keeping them separate. Insatiable curiousity and a good sense of logic are a bad combination!
Ordview is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Old Mar 5, 2008, 10:43 AM   #2
Administrator
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Savannah, GA (USA)
Posts: 22,378
Default

I'm not sure I follow you. It's not in the ISO speed selections by default (probably so that image quality is not degraded too much using the default selections).

But, all you have to do is change a custom setting if you want ISO 3200 to appear in the selections. Just select 100-3200 versus 100-1600 from this setup menu choice.

Attached Images
 
JimC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Mar 5, 2008, 10:50 AM   #3
Junior Member
 
Ordview's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Posts: 25
Default

Jim,

Thanks for helping, I guess I wasn't very clear in my query. I know how to access ISO 3200 no problem but what I was curious about is why it would not just be an ISO 100-3200 camera rather than separating out the ISO 3200 feature as a separate menu choice? I thought perhaps it had something to do with camera design or some special limitation in ISO technology?It does seem that Minolta could have just chosen to have the ISO as 100-3200 and not have the default be ISO 100-1600 with 3200 being a 'special' option? Hope that clears upthe confusion about my question.

Cheers!
Ordview is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Mar 5, 2008, 10:57 AM   #4
Administrator
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Savannah, GA (USA)
Posts: 22,378
Default

ISO 3200 is considered to be an "Extended" mode with most DSLR models. Basically, that means that the camera is multiplying the values being stored to simulate more analog amplification, resulting in degraded image quality.

IOW, you're underexposing your image when you use it, and it's "pushing" the iimage back up to the correct brightness by multiplying the RGB values after the analog to digital converter.

They did change the menu setup beginning with the 5D (it's there by default), and also added the Zone Matching options to the same screen you select the other ISO speeds from (so that you don't have to change the ISO button to Zone Matching to use it like you do with the 7D).

JimC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Mar 5, 2008, 11:59 AM   #5
Junior Member
 
Ordview's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Posts: 25
Default

Jim,

Thankyou, that makes perfect sense and my curiousity is sated. You are a wealth of knowledge when it comes to these things. I recall you helped me with my apparent focal length at infinity vs. at other distances question as well.

I miss Minolta and their organizational culture of pushing boundaries .... I hope Sony keeps up the good work? Now I'm curious to ask you what you think of what Sony is up to with Minolta's legacy (that is to say what's your opinion of the A700, A350, A300, A200 and the now discontinued A100)? I wonder ifthey parallel what Minolta would have done had they survived? Idle speculation I know but .... there's that curiousity thing of mine again. I hear good things about the A700 but I have two 7D's along with a handful of precious lensesand I am a happy camper with those for the moment.

Cheers,

Michael
Ordview is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Mar 5, 2008, 12:28 PM   #6
Administrator
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Savannah, GA (USA)
Posts: 22,378
Default

I think Sony is making good choices in most areas now.

I got an A700 in October and I really like the camera.

The new user interface is good, too. One nice thing is that a user familiar with Sony's new Quick Nav system can easily migrate to a higher end model, since this system is shared between the A200, A300, A350, and A700 now.

I think Sony is making the right choices in some of the other areas, too. They removed some features on the entry level bodies (for example, no DOF Preview button until you get to the A700 level).

But, they improved other areas like Autofocus speed with an upgraded focus motor and better predictive tracking algorithms that I'd consider to be far more important. In contrast, Nikon removed the focus motors in it's entry level bodies (they'll only work with lenses that have focus motors built in, for example, Nikon's AF-S or Sigma's HSM lenses), and went to a 3 point AF sensor.

I think Sony's choices for keeping costs down in the entry level segment are better, improving the important areas (like AF speed and accuracy, Dynamic Range, Noise Levels, Stabilization system), and cutting back on stuff most shooters wouldn't use.

Given that Sony just went from having 1 model (the A100) for sale, to 5 models for sale (A100, A200, A300, A350, A700), I think we'll start seeing more market penetration, too.

JimC is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 1:08 PM.