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Old Apr 30, 2008, 9:38 AM   #1
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See this link at Sony Style Canada for more details. They'll have a sneak preview of the upcoming Sony Full Frame 24.6 Megapixel Flagship dSLR model at The Photographic and Digital Imaging Show in Missisauga, ON. This show runs from May 2 through 4.

Sony Style Canada page with more information

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Old May 19, 2008, 11:32 AM   #2
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I wonder what the price will be. 3000? 4000?

Another thing: What is the benefit of having full size Sensor? all alpha series except the Alpha 900 will have a smaller sized sensor.

I heard and is this true?: left and right of the view are not recorded onto the picture due to it's smaller sensor size.
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Old May 19, 2008, 11:45 AM   #3
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For one thing, you can pack in more pixels and still keep the photosite size relatively large (so that they can gather more light due to to their larger surface area, needing less amplification for the same ISO sensitivity, reducing noise). Large photosies also place less demands on the lens quality needed to resolve enough detail (except for the corners).

Also, with a larger sensor or film size, you'll have a wider angle of view for any given focal length lens. With a smaller sensor or film size, you'll have a narrower angle of view for any given focal length. So, a larger sensor makes it much easier to get a wide angle of view.

If you use a camera with a smaller APS-C size sensor, you have to multiply the focal length by 1.5x to see focal length lens would give you the same angle of view on a 35mm camera (or digital camera with the same size sensor). That's why most of the kit lenses for dSLRs start out at around 18mm now (to give you the same angle of view you'd have using a 27mm lens on a 35mm camera).

A larger sensor also gives you more control over Depth of Field (you'll have a shallower depth of field for any given aperture and subject framing using a camera with a larger sensor or film size). That makes it easier to take photos at wider apertures so that your subject stands out from distracting backgrounds more.

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Old May 19, 2008, 2:58 PM   #4
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JimC wrote:
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See this link at Sony Style Canada for more details. They'll have a sneak preview of the upcoming Sony Full Frame 24.6 Megapixel Flagship dSLR model at The Photographic and Digital Imaging Show in Missisauga, ON. This show runs from May 2 through 4.

Sony Style Canada page with more information
By "FUll FRAME" do they mean at least a 4x5" sensor? 8x10"? 6x6cm? :homey:
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Old May 19, 2008, 3:18 PM   #5
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It looks to be a bit small to have a sensor that large. ;-)


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Old May 20, 2008, 1:10 AM   #6
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If all Sony Alpha lenses are compatible with Full Frame, then does that mean that Sony Alpha lenses will work with any Minolta AF film camera?
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Old May 20, 2008, 6:56 AM   #7
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No, unless you want vignetting using a DT series lens (one designed for use on a digital camera with an APS-C size sensor), since the image circle for those lenses was not designed to cover a larger sensor or film. You can use some of the Sony lenses on a Maxxum film camera (just not the DT series lenses unless you want vignetting)

As for their upcoming dSLR, my guess is that they'll have a reduced resolution (cropped) view if you use a DT series lens on it. That's the way Nikon approached it with it's D3 model (you can still use their DX series lenses, even though they were designed with a smaller image circle). They automatically mask the viewfinder image and give you a cropped view with that type of lens. We'll have to wait and see what Sony does.


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Old May 20, 2008, 8:23 AM   #8
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I hope the crop it to a square format to use all of the image the DT lenses are capable of producing. Or at least have a user option of a vertical or horizontal rectangle.

A circular crop would be better yet, but that would send to many folks into conniptions.
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Old May 20, 2008, 8:24 PM   #9
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JimC wrote:
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No, unless you want vignetting using a DT series lens (one designed for use on a digital camera with an APS-C size sensor), since the image circle for those lenses was not designed to cover a larger sensor or film. You can use some of the Sony lenses on a Maxxum film camera (just not the DT series lenses unless you want vignetting)

As for their upcoming dSLR, my guess is that they'll have a reduced resolution (cropped) view if you use a DT series lens on it. That's the way Nikon approached it with it's D3 model (you can still use their DX series lenses, even though they were designed with a smaller image circle). They automatically mask the viewfinder image and give you a cropped view with that type of lens. We'll have to wait and see what Sony does.

Ok, I thought I read somewhere that ALL Sony Alpha were FX size compatible, but obviously I was wrong there!! Sojust the Sony Alpha lenses marked DT are not suitable for full frame??

Sony make quite a few other lenses(for full frame?), so were these designed for just the Alpha cameras, with an expectation of introducing a full frame camera down the road? (or did they do it to continued suppost for older Minolta film SLRs?)

So from a mount and electronic point of view (but not necessarily sensor size), all Sony Alpha lenses are compatible with older Minolta AF SLRs??




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Old May 20, 2008, 10:25 PM   #10
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I'm a bit confused by your question. DX is a Nikon term for their lenses designed with a smaller image circle specifically for APS-C sensors. Konica Minolta started naming their lenses designed with a smaller image circle DT (and Sony does the same thing). Sigma calls their lenses like that DC. Tamron calls their lenses like that Di II. Canon calls their lenses like that EF-S.

So, yes, all Sony lenses are DX size compatible (assuming you mean an APS-C sensor). You can use a lens designed for Maxxum film cameras on a dSLR with a smaller sensor. But, not the other way around without vignetting.

The DT series lenses should still function on a 35mm film camera though. I've even tried my 18-70mm f/3.5-5.6 DT lens on a Maxxum 7000 and it worked (although I didn't actually develop any film from it, it appeared to function that way). But, you'd get vignetting trying to use one (since the image circle projected isn't large enough for that film size with those lenses).

All of the lenses I use on my A700 were designed for Maxxum film cameras, except for the 18-70mm kit lens (which is a DT series lens designed with a smaller image circle).

A number of the Sony lenses (probably most of them) are designed to work with a larger sensor. Some of that is because they're just rebranding some of the older Minolta lenses. But, some of the newer lenses were also designed for a larger sensor (take the new 24-70mm f/2.8 as one example).

Sony lenses designed for a larger sensor will work on a Maxxum film model, with some exceptions. If the lens incorporates SSM (Supersonic Motor) like the new 24-70mm f/2.8 SSM, the 300mm f/2.8 SSM, 70-200mm f/2.8 SSM or the new 70-300mm f/4.5-5.6 SSM, the film camera must be SSM compatible for AF. For example, the Maxxum 7 film camera will work them. But, many older Minolta Maxxum models won't (because they were manufactured before Minolta designed their SSM lens feature).

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