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Old Aug 18, 2008, 2:46 PM   #1
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does anyone know if the above lense will be any good for taking photo's of butterflies , also flowers and other insect shots .ive been using my beercan 70-210 for butterfly shots with some good photos .

style="BACKGROUND-COLOR: #000000"but im just wondering if this lens will be sharper and better quality for this type of photography

style="BACKGROUND-COLOR: #000000"thanks in advance

Martin
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Old Aug 18, 2008, 3:12 PM   #2
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50mm is awfully short for subjects that can be uncooperative.

Check the Close-upsForum to see what focal lengths others are using to get the results you'd like to get.
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Old Aug 18, 2008, 8:31 PM   #3
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The 50mm Macro is quite agood lens compared to the 100mm Macro. I think the 100 will produce sharper photographs with a little better bokeh anddistance from subject,but nothing will teach you more composure and technique than a 50 mm lens. I am stunned....... (noverydisappointed) that Sony does not offer the 50 as a kit lens. Photography is not about how sharp your picture is, it's about composure, technique, and composition. The camera is simply a tool of your mind or your experience to produce a pleasing photograph. Just about any of today's top cameras will produce good sharp pictures and quality bokeh? What sets you apart is your ability to compose with composure, tequinique and light.

Just my cents worth.

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Old Aug 18, 2008, 8:47 PM   #4
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Well said AJ Gressette!

I've used the 50 and100 Sony macros and the Tamron 180.

The 50 is definitely the easiest to use and is extremely sharp. With longer macros you need to close down your aperture more often and that requires a tripod.

Great little lens.
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Old Aug 28, 2008, 10:46 AM   #5
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AJ Gressette wrote:
Quote:
The 50mm Macro is quite agood lens compared to the 100mm Macro. I think the 100 will produce sharper photographs with a little better bokeh anddistance from subject,but nothing will teach you more composure and technique than a 50 mm lens. I am stunned....... (noverydisappointed) that Sony does not offer the 50 as a kit lens. Photography is not about how sharp your picture is, it's about composure, technique, and composition. The camera is simply a tool of your mind or your experience to produce a pleasing photograph. Just about any of today's top cameras will produce good sharp pictures and quality bokeh? What sets you apart is your ability to compose with composure, tequinique and light.

Just my cents worth.

AJ
The 50mm lens used to be the standard lens shipped with most (if not all) fil SLR cameras. However, unless we are talking full frame, the 50mm becomes a 75mm (or even 100mm in 4/3 format), which to me is not wide nor long enough.A good35mm would be a more usable kit lens (for my needs).
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Old Aug 29, 2008, 10:22 AM   #6
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my 50mm 2.8 macro has grown to be one of my favorite lens. i am wondering how it'd work for butterfly shots as it does focus a bit slow.... i guess it should be alright provided that the subject is in no hurry to fly away.
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Old Aug 29, 2008, 11:41 AM   #7
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I find it difficult to photograph insects and small birds withany primelens shorter than 100mm, unless the subject stays absolutely still as you get closer, you will not be able to focus fast enough to get a good picture (of course there is always that lucky shot!!!). The advantage of long zoom macro lenses is that you cantake a close-up shot withouthaving to get physically close to the subject.
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