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Old Aug 22, 2008, 5:50 PM   #11
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I've done White Balance Bracketing for odd situations, more often than Exposure Bracketing.

Sometimes, it sure would be nice to do both.
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Old Aug 22, 2008, 8:28 PM   #12
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If white balance is likely to be a problem, I'd suggest shooting RAW+JPEG. That is my initial setting out of the bag since RAW allows easier adjustments afterward if needed. RAW also allows many other adjustments if needed, though life is much easier if those things are set right in the first place.

Ain't always time to do dat.
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Old Aug 23, 2008, 12:19 AM   #13
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Ive been thinking a lot about switching to RAW + JPEG for those instances where I may need to to do some post processing. Im taking a trip in about a month and I will definitely be shooting RAW for that exact reason. one month and so much to learn! I should be alright thanks to everyone on here though!!
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Old Aug 24, 2008, 11:22 PM   #14
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firstascent wrote:
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thanks, I find myself using aperture priority the most unless im shooting moving objects which is rare.

for those that shoot in aperture priority what would you do in this situation...

As I mentioned in my first post when I took a picture of the top of some trees the images came out pretty dark (under exposed). Through the trees you can see it is a pretty bright sunny day, could this have effected the exposure and made my pics under exposed? What would you do to try and get a properly exposed image? changes on the EV scale? ISO? switch to M and adjust the shutter speed as well? something else? I have been reading my manual about the AEL lock button to lock the exposure, should I maybe try playing with that a little bit? although im not quite sure how to do it, Im not sure I understand the way my manual explains it.

Shooting in A, S or M can be tricky depending on the lens you are using. Say you have a 28-300mm and you are taking pictures at various FL. If you set the camera to A F8and FL to 300mm, you may not have enough light to keep the shutter speed at at least 1/450. How do you know that? The hand shake will appear in the viewfinder but one can very easily miss it. When you shoot in M, then you need to be aware of the ISO setting since M mode will default to ISO 100. So, again, if you choose a combination of shutter speed and aperture without having enough light, the camera will not produce sharp images. If you use A, S or M, you also need to pay attention to the blinking warning. In other words, if you choose a shutter speed/aperture combination that is incorrect based on the light available, the other value will blink (i.e. you set the aperture to f/8, the shutter value will blink if the lowest speed is not slow enough. The camera is telling you that the aperture needs to be reduced in order for the exposure to be accurate. Obviously the same applies to situations where you are selecting the shutter speed with a preset aperture value.

One easy way tovalidate the settings is to set the camera to P mode and see what it's picked for A and S values.

I use A and S modes the most. Since lenses such as mine (Tamron 28-300mm) usually produces sharper images at f/8 or f/11, I tend to set the camera to A f/8 or f/11 depensing on the available light. However, shooting at 300mm the shutter speed should be at least 1/400, so if I'm shooting in not so bright considtions, I pay attention to the shutter speed. It's better to shoot at 1/500 with an aperture of f/5.6 then at 1/125 and f/8.

Hope I did not confuse you any further.

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Old Aug 25, 2008, 3:43 AM   #15
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Thanks Tullio, that does help. The only thing I'm a little confused about it P mode? What exactly is it. you mentioned I could switch to P mode to get the correct settings. Do you mean if I focus on something and half press the shutter button...the values it chooses is what I could/should try in M or S mode if my setting won't work? Oh and I know a lot of people recommend shooting at ISO 100 (depending on the situation), would you all recommend just keeping my setting at 100 and just change it when I need to or should I set it on AUTO?

Also, this is a little off topic but I didn't want to start a new one. Ive been asking a lot of questions lately =) This may be an obvious answer but I couldn't find what im looking for online or in my manual. Infinity Focus...How do I do it on my camera. Is it camera specific or lens specific? Ive read some info online saying you have to focus your lens to the infinity symbol but my kit lens doesn't have that. so does that mean my camera can't do it unless I get a lens that includes that option?
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Old Aug 25, 2008, 7:46 AM   #16
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Personally I shoot A for the majority of the time with M for sports with with pretty constant lighting and S when I want to bring in motion blur for shooting motorsport.

Also when using flash in lower light conditions I use M but for better lit ones it will use A.

Anyway, in your situation I wouldn't take the backward step of going to P, you already have an understanding of A so stick with that. If you are using longer focal lengths then just remember as you use them to set the aperture/ISO as needed to keep camera shake out of the equation. As I guess you are working with a KM or Sony dSLR then you will have IS as an option which can help.

As you are shooting, get into the habit of checking the settings as you go, make sure you have the right aperture, the right shutter speed for the shot you desire. If something is not right change it, if you think you will need to use different focal lengths without time to change settings to get the best shot then go for the most extreme settings to start with, however this is rarely the case if you are planning shots and working on getting a good one rather than snapping randomly at things you see.

As for the infinity question, post a new thread otherwise you will not get new people engaged with the question.
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Old Aug 25, 2008, 1:02 PM   #17
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Thanks Mark, yes I have a sony (a300), I pretty much always have the IS turned on. Actually I don't ever think I have turned it off.

when using longer focal lengths why would you adjust the ISO as well as the aperture. I don't have a great understand of ISO settings, I thought it was more so you would set a higher ISO if it was dark outside or dim, but if it was bright and sunny would you still adjust ISO depending on your focal length?
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Old Aug 25, 2008, 1:19 PM   #18
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firstascent wrote:
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when using longer focal lengths why would you adjust the ISO as well as the aperture. I don't have a great understand of ISO settings, I thought it was more so you would set a higher ISO if it was dark outside or dim, but if it was bright and sunny would you still adjust ISO depending on your focal length?
ISO, aperture and shutter speed all work together to set a proper exposure.

Shutter speed is often important to prevent 2 different things:

1. Camera shake - if the shutter speed is too slow, you wont physically be able to hold the gear steady enough to keep the picture from being at least somewhat blurred.

2. Motion blur - if your subject is moving you may need a certain shutter speed so that movement is frozen in the resulting shot.

With regards to camera shake, the GENERAL rule of thumb is that you need a shutter speed of 1 / focal length to avoid camera shake. It's a general guideline. Each person is different. And, quite honestly gear is different. A 300mm 2.8 lens is a HECK of a lot heavier than a 300mm 5.6 lens. So you would need much faster shutter speeds to hand-hold a 300mm 2.8 than a 300mm 5.6. So, sticking with this "guideline" - 1/50 is good enough for a 50mm focal length. But at 300mm you need 1/300. You MAY have to adjust ISO and or aperture to be able to achieve that 1/300 (or whatever it is you as the shooter need with that specific piece of gear). Now, IS will reduce that by 2-3 stops (i.e. instead of 1/300 IS should allow you to handhold at 1/150 or 1/80).

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