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Old Aug 20, 2008, 7:47 PM   #1
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Just curious what shooting modes everyone uses the most? Im sure the type of photography your into would help decide that as well. But Im talking about more general shooting.

Mainly if you were just walking around taking random pictures would you just use 'Auto' or would some of you still prefer 'A', 'S', 'M' etc...

One reason I ask is I have been using 'A' and 'S' a lot lately, mostly to just get used to those settings, I was already on 'A' mode and took a pic of the top of some trees in my backyard, multiple pics at different f/ stops, and they all came out underexposed. I just switched it to Auto and the pic came out great.

Would you constantly switch to different modes depending on what you are shooting as if you were just walking around taking pics? Or would you just stick to Auto mode?

Thanks
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Old Aug 20, 2008, 9:44 PM   #2
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Mostly, I shoot in Aperture Priority, Center Weighted, Continuous shooting and Continuous autofocus. It's rare that I'll switch to something else.

Sometimes, I'll get a sequence when all I really wanted was a single shot, but hey, I don't have to pay for developing!

Sometimes I'll get some dimmer shadows, but those can be fixed in post processing.

I have mostly fast lenses (not really fast) so I'm usually mindful of the depth of field. In Aperture Priority I can stop down for more sharpness, more depth of fieldor to prevent motion blur. Anything else and I would have to relearn everything.
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Old Aug 21, 2008, 12:05 AM   #3
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I tend to stay in "P" mode with spot focus and matrix metering. I'm a "recomposer" so I find spot focus the most accurate. Program mode is essentially like Auto but it lets you adjust aperature or shutter speed with a turn of the front or back dials (depending on how you have them set-up) along with customizing more than Auto let's you do. I find it very flexible.
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Old Aug 21, 2008, 1:59 PM   #4
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For 'general shooting' I'd say 95% aperture priority if I'm not using flash. If I'm using flash I'll shoot manual. The reason I shoot aperture priority is I like subject isolation. So I use the widest aperture I can and still get the shot I want. So, in other words if I only need the DOF of f4 I don't want the camera choosing f8.

In any of the modes other than manual it's a good idea to get an understanding of the different exposure settings (center weighted, spot, evaluative, etc...) - if you understand how the camera meters you'll better be able to predict how to use exposure compensation to get the shot you want.
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Old Aug 21, 2008, 9:02 PM   #5
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Depends on how I am using the camera. It is set to aperature priority, ISO 200, matrix meetering, single shot when it is in the case. Ready to grab and shoot. If I am going to be shooting a bunch in the same light conditions, I switch to manual and ding about with the histogram to figure out what exposure settings I want.
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Old Aug 22, 2008, 1:27 AM   #6
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thanks, I find myself using aperture priority the most unless im shooting moving objects which is rare.

for those that shoot in aperture priority what would you do in this situation...

As I mentioned in my first post when I took a picture of the top of some trees the images came out pretty dark (under exposed). Through the trees you can see it is a pretty bright sunny day, could this have effected the exposure and made my pics under exposed? What would you do to try and get a properly exposed image? changes on the EV scale? ISO? switch to M and adjust the shutter speed as well? something else? I have been reading my manual about the AEL lock button to lock the exposure, should I maybe try playing with that a little bit? although im not quite sure how to do it, Im not sure I understand the way my manual explains it.
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Old Aug 22, 2008, 5:45 AM   #7
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Sure the light through the trees can affect exposure. As to what to do - if it's a slight underexposure just use exposure compensation. But I'd be more inclined to go to manual - the simple reason being unless your framing is exactly the same every time you change a setting, the camera may meter slightly differently. So I'd take the reading from the first shot - dial those numbers in on manual and make an adjustment to ISO or shutter speed to lessen the exposure - and repeat - until I had the exposure I wanted.
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Old Aug 22, 2008, 6:35 AM   #8
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It's hard to tell what's actually happening without an example, but for extraordinary situations you could always use exposure bracketing.
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Old Aug 22, 2008, 1:23 PM   #9
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I deleted the pics but I'm almost positive I can recreate it on my next day off.

Exposure bracketing - that's when the camera takes 3 different photos with different exposures right?

When you say exposure compensation do you mean making adjustments on the EV scale?
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Old Aug 22, 2008, 1:53 PM   #10
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firstascent wrote:
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Exposure bracketing - that's when the camera takes 3 different photos with different exposures right?

When you say exposure compensation do you mean making adjustments on the EV scale?
Correct on both counts. I found exposure bracketing great with film but just don't use it with digital. To me it's just easier to shoot, look at results then adjust the exposure and repeat. I don't need to go into the menu to set bracketing (i.e. if you default to 1/3, 1/2 or 1 stop what if you really need a different adjustment from the first shot you took). But, if it works for you try it.

And yes, on EC, you move the adjustment up/down the EV scale. In AV mode this will adjust the shutter speed up/down to intentionally over/under expose the shot as compared to how the camera THINKS it should be exposed. But remember - the challenge with that is if you pull the camera down to adjust EC and then compose the shot again the camera MAY meter differently because the shot isn't composed the exact same. so pay attention in the viewfinder to what settings the camera intends to use.
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