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Old Dec 8, 2008, 12:10 AM   #1
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hello all well im shooting a wedding for my best friend and i need some help wich setting should i use please help thank you.
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Old Dec 8, 2008, 1:04 AM   #2
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PLEASE HELP ASAP
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Old Dec 8, 2008, 1:22 AM   #3
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If you've never shot a wedding before, and you want your best friend to stay your best friend, and most important, if you want your best friend's wife to not hate you, pay for a professional wedding photographer.
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Old Dec 8, 2008, 10:02 AM   #4
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well the problem is that the wedding is small budget so i was just trying figure out which setting would be best for shooting like action pics and some portraits
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Old Dec 8, 2008, 10:53 AM   #5
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I hear what you're saying - but you need to make sure your friend has the appropriate expectations. Sometimes people think that a DSLR is a magic box. You need to make sure they understand your photos will be no better than what other guests are taking even if you do have a more expensive camera.

Having said that - there are a lot of variables involved - so the 'right settings' would change as those variables change.

Ceremony shots - typically no flash is allowed. If it's indoors you're in a low light situation. You need high ISOs (which the A200 is poor at) and wide aperture lenses (think f2.8 or wider). If all you have is the kit lens you're in a bit of a bind. My suggestion there is set ISO to 1600, shoot in aperture priority and set aperture to widest setting. Also, shoot in RAW as you'll likely have white balance issues in addition to possible exposure issues.

Posed shots - indoors or out? How big is the wedding party? Indoors you'll need to use flash. Hopefully you have an external flash. If you don't then you'll likely have some red-eye issues. For group shots you'll need to keep the groups small as you'll have issues with not enough light spread for larger groups.

Action shots? Presumably dancing and such? Again, external flash is preferable but if you don't have one you'll have to use the built in flash. The flash will freeze the motion IF the camera's exposure settings are 2-3 stops below ambient exposure. The closer your camera's exposure settings are to ambient the more "ghosting" you'll see in the images.

Hopefully all this makes sense. If it doesn't then low budget or not you really need your friend to understand you don't know enough yet to take anything more than snapshots.

And this is NOT meant as a knock on you by any stretch. It's just that there are a LOT of complicated things going on taking photos at a wedding. If it was easy, pros wouldn't get $3000 for doing it.
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Old Dec 8, 2008, 10:58 AM   #6
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And oh yes, bring spare batteries. Take a LOT of shots, shooting each in RAW. Expect the keeper rate to be low.

AND, don't forget to lower the ISO from 1600 to 400 for indoorsonce you're allowed to use flash.

As a general guideline for group shots, one row of people shoot at f5.6 - change aperture down by 1 stop for each row of people (this is JUST a swag - it's a LOT more complex than that but this is just something to hopefully get better results than just using full auto mode).
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Old Dec 8, 2008, 2:01 PM   #7
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adrian_m wrote:
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well the problem is that the wedding is small budget ...
So make it your wedding present to them.
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Old Dec 8, 2008, 3:44 PM   #8
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TCav wrote:
Quote:
adrian_m wrote:
Quote:
well the problem is that the wedding is small budget ...
So make it your wedding present to them.
no comment to that i ask nicely about shooting mode and i was expecting a lil help
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Old Dec 9, 2008, 1:46 PM   #9
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adrian_m wrote:
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no comment to that i ask nicely about shooting mode and i was expecting a lil help
Although I've offered some advice, I'd like to address this comment. I really do agree with TCAV. Tight budget or not, a wedding day is one of the most important days in anyone's life. As photographers we always want to take photos - nothing wrong with that. But it's important, IMO, that for friends and family we put their needs above our own egos. In other words ask yourself, is it more important your friend gets quality photos of her important day or more important that you yourself take the photos?

There is probably no other event in life where photos are as important as a wedding day. You can't do a re-shoot and unlike senior portraits or the like (where after a couple years no one really cares about them) wedding photos tend to last as long as the marriage does and still be treasured that whole time.

And because of the various situations, it's difficult to get good shots.

So, you may not want to hear TCAV's advice, but it's still good advice just the same. If you can't afford to hire a photographer that's understandable. But the mere fact you are asking what settings to use says you're woefully unprepared to be the primary photographer for such an important event. For your AND your friend's sake I wish you good luck. The advice I provided in earlier posts is not nearly enough to prepare you for this undertaking.



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Old Dec 9, 2008, 4:50 PM   #10
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adrian_m wrote:
Quote:
TCav wrote:
Quote:
adrian_m wrote:
Quote:
well the problem is that the wedding is small budget ...
So make it your wedding present to them.
no comment to that i ask nicely about shooting mode and i was expecting a lil help
A little help is not what you need.

I had been a hobbyist photographer, off and on,for about 20 years. When a good friend asked me to photograph her wedding, I tried to disuade her, but she persuaded me. It did not go well. That was almost 20 years ago, and I still regret doing it every time I see them.

Pay for a pro.
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