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Old Apr 20, 2009, 11:00 AM   #1
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I see that some of my pics come out under/over exposed when looking at the pic in the LCD. What steps canI take to prevent this?
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Old Apr 20, 2009, 11:28 AM   #2
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antonlmo wrote:
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I see that some of my pics come out under/over exposed when looking at the pic in the LCD. What steps canI take to prevent this?
How do you see it? Histograms? That's the best tool for judging exposure.
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Old Apr 20, 2009, 1:27 PM   #3
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antonlmo wrote:
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I see that some of my pics come out under/over exposed when looking at the pic in the LCD. What steps canI take to prevent this?
Preventing it takes a great amount of experience and even pros still get it wrong.

But, the first thing to do is read and understand the different metering modes your camera has available and how much of the image they use to calculate the exposure.

Second you need to get an understanding of dynamic range. The reality is there are many scenes where the dynamic range is too great for the camera's sensor to capture. Depending on the type of shot there are different tools/techniques for dealing with this (flashs, HDR, blended exposures, shooting at a different time of day, shoot from a different angle,etc...)

But, one of the great things about digital photography is the ability to see instantly the shot - AND ITS HISTOGRAM (as TCAV pointed out) so you can immediately review the shot and see if it is badly over or underexposed- allowing you to take the shot again. You make an adjustment, take the shot again and repeat the process. The real key is understanding WHY the under or over exposure occured. What metering mode was being used and what in the image could have caused the under or over exposure? In this manner you begin to recognize these things and make adjustments BEFORE the first shot is taken. By the time you get home and get photos on your computer it's too late - the best opportunity to really learn is out in the field
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Old Apr 20, 2009, 1:34 PM   #4
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Right now I'm reading about the histogram. ButI was referring to the picture itself, which from what im reading is not necessarily true.If it appears to be overexposedon the lcd, it may not be a true representation.Any quick tips on how to read the histogram?
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Old Apr 20, 2009, 1:36 PM   #5
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antonlmo wrote:
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Any quick tips on how to read the histogram?
http://www.luminous-landscape.com/tu...stograms.shtml
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Old Apr 20, 2009, 1:39 PM   #6
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Thanks again!
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