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Old Jun 25, 2009, 4:49 PM   #11
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Depending on the season, a get the opportunity to photograph deer, moose, bear, and the occasional eagle. For birds and small game I would be much closer.
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Old Jun 25, 2009, 5:26 PM   #12
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Hi JimC,

I had'nt seen your earlier post until now. On page 88 of the manual it states the following.

"Adjusting the brightness of the image
(Exposure, Flash compensation,
Metering)
Except for recording mode M, the exposure is automatically selected
(Automatic exposure).
Based on the exposure acquired by the automatic exposure, you can
perform exposure compensation by shifting the exposure to either the +
side or the – side, depending on your preference. You can make the entire
image brighter by shifting to the + side. The entire image becomes darker
when you shift it to the – side.
Using brightness compensation for the entire image
(Exposure compensation)

1
Press the button.

• The exposure compensation screen is

displayed in the viewfinder mode.


button

2








Adjust the exposure with the

control dial.

Toward + (over): Brightens an image.

Toward – (under): Darkens an image.





Standard exposure"




And on page 91


Selecting the method for measuring the brightness of a


subject (Metering mode)





(Multi segment)
This mode measures light on each area after dividing the total


area into multiple areas and determines the proper exposure


of the entire screen.






(Center weighted)
While emphasizing the central area of the screen, this mode

measures the average brightness of the entire screen.




(Spot)
This mode measures light at or around the focus area located

in the center of the frame.






Shooting technique


• Use (Multi segment) metering for general shooting.

Note


• When the exposure mode is set to AUTO or Scene Selection, [Metering mode] is

fixed to (Multi segment) and you cannot select other modes.



So I believe it is doing as I stated and allowing for AEL. Wouldn't want to mis-inform anyone.
Sorry for the gaps those are pictures which would'nt come over from the manual.

Last edited by oman321; Jun 25, 2009 at 5:30 PM.
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Old Jun 25, 2009, 5:31 PM   #13
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I think I'd want to be further away from the bear. ;-)

For occasional wildlife photos, most users are start out with a 70-300mm lens.

But, if you want to fill the frame more (so that the subject occupies a greater portion of the frame without cropping for even better detail), you may want to go with something longer, depending on budget. For example, a Sony 70-400mm lens or a Sigma 50-500mm lens (keeping size and weight in mind).

You'll find a focal length calculator on this page that may come in handy. You can plug in the subject distance, subject size, and type of camera (use digital SLR with CF of 1.5x for the A300 or A330). Then, when you press the Calculate button, it will tell you how long the focal length needs to be in order to fill the frame with that subject size from the selected distance.

http://www.cambridgeincolour.com/tut...era-lenses.htm
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Old Jun 25, 2009, 5:41 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by oman321 View Post
...So I believe it is doing as I stated and allowing for AEL. Wouldn't want to mis-inform anyone.
None of that has anything to do with AEL. I didn't think I would have missed it with a quick skim of manual (but, you had my hopes up for a minute). If that's what you're talking about, that's not AEL.

You're only reading portions describing metering modes and how Exposure Compensation works. That's not the same thing.

The only way I saw to lock exposure in non-manual modes from my quick skim through the manual was by using a half press of the shutter button (which locks focus at the same time).
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Old Jun 25, 2009, 5:47 PM   #15
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Sorry about that you know I'm a newb and am still learning.
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Old Jun 25, 2009, 5:52 PM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by oman321 View Post
Sorry about that you know I'm a newb and am still learning.
Me too. Big time!!
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Old Jun 25, 2009, 5:53 PM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JimC View Post
The only way I saw to lock exposure in non-manual modes from my quick skim through the manual was by using a half press of the shutter button (which locks focus at the same time).
... except when using Continuous AF (AF-C), in which case, a half press of the shutter button would be AEL.
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Old Jun 25, 2009, 6:08 PM   #18
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OK -- but, you're still locking focus on the subject (it's just going to track it when moving using AF-C).

So, you're not separating exposure lock into a dedicated function (i.e., you have no way to lock exposure without impacting your focus at the same time unless you go either manual exposure or manual focus).
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Old Jun 25, 2009, 6:15 PM   #19
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A half press of the shutter button causes the camera to focus. When using AF-C, when you recompose, the camera will focus on something else. So a half press of the shutter button doesn't lock focus, only exposure, when using Continuous AF (AF-C).
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Old Jun 25, 2009, 6:32 PM   #20
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Quote:
...the camera will focus on something else
But, what else it's focusing on would be the question (i.e., is it your desired subject). ;-)

You don't get a viewfinder indication of the used focus point except for the first half press when it acquires lock using AF-C.

So, if you lose that focus lock and it needs to reacquire it (because you reframed after the intial lock), you're not going to get another indication of what it's locking on without another half press (losing your initial exposure lock when you do that).

Whether or not it always uses the first selected focus point if it loses the target and needs to reacquire it would be the question you'd need to answer to find out if that solution might be workable in some conditions (i.e, set the camera to use center point only and hope it uses it again when it loses focus and reacquires it, versus the camera reacquiring what it thinks is the likely target with one of the other focus points).
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