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Old Aug 28, 2009, 11:07 AM   #41
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Quote:
Originally Posted by michaellee2222 View Post
just take my a230..but seen hard to used it...maybe because i'm new?
another question is when shooting in indoor even the steady shoot function is on why the photo also blur...is it my hand shake?
but my mode is using auto mode without flash...
IMO, DSLRs should not have an AUTO mode, period. The reason is because very seldom they perform at their best in AUTO mode. However, by offering this mode, it gives the photographer the illusion that all he/she has to do is to set that dial to AUTO and voila...the camera will produce the best quality images at the press of a button. Your comment is not unique. I read over and over again people describing their frustrations over bad images taken in AUTO mode. Off course they expect the AUTO to be IT. After all, the engineers who wrote the firmware should know better than anyone else so why not use it? So, my first suggestion is to avoid the AUTO mode. Use P instead. It's almost like AUTO as the camera chooses the aperture and and shutter speed that it feels appropriate but it gives you the ability to change other settings, such as Pict adjust, ISO, WB, etc.

Shooting indoors in low light w/o flash is very very tricky. First you need to pay attention to the shutter speed. Even with image stabilization, you should not go below 1/30 when shooting still subjects (an that's already a stretch...you must have very steady hands). If you are below this speed, you then should increase ISO. As you do that, image quality deteriorates (rapidly with some cameras). Next is the white balance issue. TCav's second photo is a good example of inaccurate WB setting (probably AUTO). Improper handling of the WB will affect the image tremendously. In theory, the affect is on the color cast and can (somewhat) easily be fixed in photo editors. But in my experience, it goes beyond that. It actually affect clarity, DR, sharpness...in other words, the image can be a total mess. The last point I want to make is with regards to the AF system. Again, not all cameras handle low light very well when it comes to AF. Even with AF assist. The camera may indicate that it was able to focus and the focus is locked but once the picture is taken, the image does not appear to be as sharp. The reason is because of the focusing system they use (contrast based). You lower the light and the system starts to play tricks on itself. Add distance to that and things get real bad. Have you ever been in a museum where photography is not allowed (not even w/o flash) but you decide you are going to sneak a quick shot since no one's watching you? If so, how good was that shot? Probably not very good at all and the reason is because you did it in a hurry, used incorrect settings, speed was too slow and the camera could not focus accurately due to the low light.
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Old Aug 28, 2009, 11:17 AM   #42
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Actually, my guess is if Auto mode was being used, the photos wouldn't have been blurry. That's because the A230 will automatically use the flash in Green Auto mode when light gets too low. The OP mentioned taking photos indoors *without* a flash. ;-)

So, if light was too low (the most likely problem causing blurry photos indoors), and the flash was forced off (using a different mode to override the camera's auto settings), you're going to get blurry images.

The A230 was designed to be a very easy to use dSLR for beginners. But, if you override the default settings (for example, forcing flash off with a dimmer lens indoors), you need to be aware that you may get unintended consequences.

To put things into perspective, a typical home interior at night with incandescent lighting would require a shutter speed of around 1/8 second at ISO 800 and f/5.6 (which is the widest available aperture you're going to have with an 18-55mm kit lens from Nikon, Pentax, Sony, or Canon when zoomed in much).

You would normally want shutter speeds 10 times as fast to prevent blur from camera shake at 55mm with a camera using an APS-C size sensor. ;-)

So, even with Anti-Shake, your shutter speeds are going to be slower than you can expect good results with, unless you're very careful about smoothly squeezing the shutter button and trying to keep the camera as steady as possible, even for stationary subjects. For moving subjects, forget it using a kit lens without a flash. If light was even lower, even slower shutter speeds would be needed.

Without a sample image showing settings, we can only guess as to what the problem was. But, the most common issue causing blurry photos indoors is trying to take photos without a flash when light is dim enough to need one.
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Old Sep 2, 2009, 1:25 AM   #43
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Well, Mr JimC-

I have taken a chance and ordered the Sony A-230 based on your postings. I sincerely hope that we will have a very workable camera when it arrives on 09/03 for testing along side the Canon XS DSLR camera.

I sincerely hope that you enjoyed a great day, JimC!

Sarah Joyce
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Old Sep 2, 2009, 2:06 AM   #44
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Yes, Tullio, I agree with you-

An Auto Mode on a DSLR camera is sort of a contradiction. The Auto Mode does as good a job as it can. However, it should not be seen as a total solution. Especially so if the user decides that they will alter the DSLR camera's settings.

Sarah Joyce
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Old Sep 6, 2009, 7:53 AM   #45
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hi all..wanna ask what is the purpose of the eye hood?
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Old Sep 6, 2009, 8:41 AM   #46
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If you mean the eyepiece cup (rubber cup that slides down over the viewfinder), it helps to prevent light from entering the viewfinder and provides a small cushion for you to rest your eye against when shooting.

If you mean the eyepiece cover, it's designed to block all light from entering the viewfinder if you are shooting from a tripod using a remote shutter release or self timer (since excessive light entering the viewfinder can impact the camera's metering). Basically, you slide the installed eyepiece cup straight up, and then slide the eyepiece cover over your viewfinder instead.
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Old Sep 6, 2009, 9:08 AM   #47
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[QUOTE=JimC;998479]If you mean the eyepiece cup (rubber cup that slides down over the viewfinder), it helps to prevent light from entering the viewfinder and provides a small cushion for you to rest your eye against when shooting.

yes..is that thing..when place it is close the viewfinder...but actually what is that...sorry for the stupit answer
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Old Sep 6, 2009, 9:13 AM   #48
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It's an eyepiece cup. Again, it just helps to prevent light from entering the viewfinder (since you have a rubber edge designed to fit over your eye when your face is pressed against it). The rubber also helps make it more comfortable to shoot (so that you don't have a harder edge pressing around your eye), and that extra cushion can help to protect the viewfinder, too. You'll find a similar eyepiece cup on other dSLR models.

If you mean the eyepiece cover (where you can remove the eyepiece cup and replace it with an eyepiece cover), that just keeps any light from entering the viewfinder. It would only be used when shooting from a tripod (when you have already adjusted the desired composition first).

When you have excessive light entering the viewfinder (as you might if you don't have your face pressed against it when shooting with a self timer), that can impact the camera's metering (the sensor it uses to measure the lighting from your subject to determine how to expose it). So, the eyepiece cover allows you to block any light from entering via the viewfinder. That way, the only light reaching the camera's metering sensor is coming from the lens (where your subject is) versus entering from the viewfinder area. Keep in mind that they're all connected via mirrors. So, light entering from the viewfinder can impact how the camera exposes the scene.
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Old Sep 6, 2009, 9:18 AM   #49
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but my eyespiese is close the viewfinder...how i know what i have focus..
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Old Sep 6, 2009, 9:20 AM   #50
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You don't. You would need to compose the photo first (before installing the eyepiece cover).

Again, it's only designed to be used when you are shooting from a tripod, after you have everything setup (composition, desired camera settings, etc.), when you are not using the viewfinder when shooting (as you might if using the self timer feature, or a remote cable release). Most shooters never even use that accessory.
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