Go Back   Steve's Digicams Forums > Digital SLR and Interchangeable Lens Cameras > Sony Alpha dSLR / Konica Minolta dSLR, Sony SLT

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old Jun 8, 2010, 1:09 PM   #1
Senior Member
 
Old Boat Guy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: East Texas
Posts: 362
Default Maxxum lens choices for A550

As TCav pointed out on my MC/MD thread the old lenses lose what made them nice when you add the converter. (do you ever get tired of being right?)

The good news (for me anyway) is I have a large number of the AF lenses made prior to 1990 with a number of duplicates. I want to sell or trade some of my longer duplicates as I am hurting for lenses on the short end. My new Sony is the first digital camera these lenses have seen so when my father was buying or trading for these he did not see a need for short lenses.

Here is an example of what I am wondering. I have three 85mm lenses. One is a F1:1.4 and two are the F1:2.8 . Are there circumstances where one would be preferred over another or do I just go by number? If I base this on current prices the F1:1.4 seems the to keep choice over a F1:2.8? Shooting with a 50 mm lens would you automatically pick the F1:1.4 over the other 50 mm options? (the F1:2.8 macro excepted of course)

I would use all of them and look for the differences but some are still in the factory wrapping and I would prefer to not open them. These lenses have been in a sealed with tape box to prevent dust and always stored in a climate controlled environment. I did open the 16 mm F1:2.8 fisheye to shoot images for a friend that sells real estate and it was as new in perfect condition.

I do have a couple of short zooms and Beercan's so does my lack of short prime lenses under 50 mm really matter?

I have done product work with a light box and have found the 50 mm F1:2.8 Macro to be fine but would opening the 100 mm F1:2.8 with Macro show a benefit?

I have a Justice of the Peace wedding this weekend but I would NEVER do primary on a formal wedding job.

I sell wildlife images through a friend's gallery and another couple that does rustic framing who sells prints at flea markets and the like. (they say "Trade Show" and "Swap Meet" but a flea is a flea regardless of what you might wish to call it)

Church socials and want to set up a real studio to do classic portraiture.

Do I really need a sub 50 mm prime lens? Do I need a short zoom other than than my current 28 to 85 F1:3.5? (I also have a 35 to 70)

Any thoughts or suggestions?

Steve
Old Boat Guy is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Old Jun 8, 2010, 1:18 PM   #2
Administrator
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Savannah, GA (USA)
Posts: 22,378
Default

If you're shooting in existing light, a lens that's brighter than f/2.8 can come in very handy so that you'll get faster shutter speeds to help with blur from subject movement.

You'd also get a shallower DOF with a wider aperture, and that can come in handy for helping your subject stand out from distracting backgrounds. If it were me, I'd definitely keep one of the 85mm f/1.4 AF lenses for use indoors in low light (plays, musicals, dance recitals, weddings, etc.), as well as for portraits. I use a Minolta 100mm f/2 AF lens for that purpose. But, at times, 85mm would be a more convenient focal length.

AFAIK, Minolta didn't make any 85mm f/2.8 AF lenses (although they made some manual focus lenses that way).

As for something in a zoom that's shorter than 28mm, personally, I find 28mm a bit long in some conditions (as you can't always back up far enough to fit what you want into the frame; and a 28mm lens on a Sony model with an APS-C size sensor gives you the same angle of view you'd have using 42mm lens on a 35mm camera). As for primes, I tend to use a 28mm more than a 50mm indoors (but, both can come in handy, depending on what you're shooting).

I use a 24-85mm f/3.5-4.5 as a walk around lens a lot. But, even with a lens starting out at a wider 24mm (versus 28mm as with your 28-85mm lens), it's still borderline trying to fit what you need into the frame for some subject types (especially with group photos indoors in tighter quarters), so I sometimes need to swap lenses for something wider.
JimC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jun 8, 2010, 1:31 PM   #3
Administrator
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Savannah, GA (USA)
Posts: 22,378
Default

Quote:
I have done product work with a light box and have found the 50 mm F1:2.8 Macro to be fine but would opening the 100 mm F1:2.8 with Macro show a benefit?
You'd have more working distance with the longer lens, so that you'd have less risk of blocking light/casting shadows, spooking smaller subjects, etc. Whether or not you'd need a 100mm macro would depend on your shooting style. I don't do much in the way of macro shooting myself.
JimC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jun 8, 2010, 1:49 PM   #4
Senior Member
 
Old Boat Guy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: East Texas
Posts: 362
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by JimC View Post
AFAIK, Minolta didn't make any 85mm f/2.8 AF lenses (although they made some manual focus lenses that way).
I just looked and you are correct. The 85 F/2.8 are both Roxxor-X lenses.


Steve
Old Boat Guy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jun 8, 2010, 2:07 PM   #5
Senior Member
 
TCav's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Washington, DC, Metro Area, Maryland
Posts: 13,571
Default

The 85/1.4 is a classic portrait lens. Keep it. (Both of them!)

For short focal lengths, I've always had great luck with the Tamron 17-50/2.8.
__________________
  • The lens is the thing.
  • 'Full Frame' is the new 'Medium Format'.
  • "One good test is worth a thousand expert opinions." - Tex Johnston, Boeing 707 test pilot.
TCav is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jun 8, 2010, 3:37 PM   #6
Senior Member
 
Old Boat Guy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: East Texas
Posts: 362
Default

On a second note I spent some time yesterday with my optical guru to try and deal with my eye relief/paralax issue with the viewfinder. Marris made an interesting comment when I explained my problem.

He said he was not surprised I was having a problem as I am a touch farsighted along with my astigmatism.

An engineer in Japan will automatically allow for correction adjustment based on their cultures statistical majority if there should be one at issue. In the case of vision the stats from the Asian market an engineer would tailor focus correction adjustment for the nearsighted person.

For the nearsighted eye relief is always long and for the far sighted it is always short. (my buying a camera from Hong Kong could also be at issue)

We started with the extender that I had bought from one of the links you provided. The first thing we did was turn the glass around which gave clear focus but still a smaller than wanted circle. We did our best to work out the trig and took a couple of spare lenses for the exam room and came up with something close.

The FDA-ME1AM extender I bought from the link you provided is an asymmetrical lens claiming a magnification that I could not see. For me it made the circle smaller and the edges more to the fuzzy. (imagine a telescope lined with fur) I could still see clearly without my glasses.

He ground one lens to deal with objective distance and prism and the second to give a bit of magnification. We had to use two flat based lenses facing opposite of one another with oil for a damper and came quite close. It is not a real fix because of the oil used to mate the lenses but a full lens is on order that we believe will solve all of the issues. I will not get the display on the bottom but will see the frame corner to corner.

This is just me being anal. As I would say in the office "it adversly affects my sense of proportion" that it is not as it could be.

All of that being said, if we get this right is there a market for custom viewfinder lenses? Provide your prescription and a lens could be cut to fit the above mentioned extension. Mark it up cost plus 20 and give the profits to a school somewhere.

Steve

Last edited by Old Boat Guy; Jun 8, 2010 at 4:04 PM. Reason: brain damage
Old Boat Guy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jun 8, 2010, 4:37 PM   #7
Senior Member
 
Old Boat Guy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: East Texas
Posts: 362
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by TCav View Post
The 85/1.4 is a classic portrait lens. Keep it. (Both of them!)

For short focal lengths, I've always had great luck with the Tamron 17-50/2.8.
Is this the same lens I found at the $500.00 range?
Old Boat Guy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jun 8, 2010, 5:02 PM   #8
Senior Member
 
TCav's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Washington, DC, Metro Area, Maryland
Posts: 13,571
Default

http://www.tamron.com/lenses/prod/1750_diII_a016.asp

http://www.slrgear.com/reviews/showp...uct/355/cat/23
http://www.photozone.de/sony-alpha-a...n_1750_28_sony

Currently $414 at Adorama:

http://www.adorama.com/TM1750MAX.html
__________________
  • The lens is the thing.
  • 'Full Frame' is the new 'Medium Format'.
  • "One good test is worth a thousand expert opinions." - Tex Johnston, Boeing 707 test pilot.
TCav is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jun 8, 2010, 5:28 PM   #9
Senior Member
 
Old Boat Guy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: East Texas
Posts: 362
Default

At the F/2.8 do you find yourself limited?

Are the short lenses more an issue of angle?

Last edited by Old Boat Guy; Jun 8, 2010 at 6:24 PM.
Old Boat Guy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jun 8, 2010, 11:25 PM   #10
Senior Member
 
TCav's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Washington, DC, Metro Area, Maryland
Posts: 13,571
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Old Boat Guy View Post
At the F/2.8 do you find yourself limited?
Well, f/2.8 isn't as good as f/1.8, but it's way better than the f/5.0 @ 50mm you get with the kit lens. When I had the Tamron 17-50/2.8, I also had the Minolta 50/1.7 but I hardly ever used it. I had 5 lenses, but usually, when I wasn't using the Beercan, I was using the Tamron 17-50/2.8.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Old Boat Guy View Post
Are the short lenses more an issue of angle?
As in? ... too much? ... not enough? ... distortion?
__________________
  • The lens is the thing.
  • 'Full Frame' is the new 'Medium Format'.
  • "One good test is worth a thousand expert opinions." - Tex Johnston, Boeing 707 test pilot.
TCav is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 1:08 PM.