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Old Jan 8, 2012, 5:15 PM   #11
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it will get dirty sooner or later.
I'm getting a Tamron 18-200mm lens, wich I'll never take off! And since I'm not shooting in the desert, I assume dust or dirt won't be an issue...
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Old Jan 8, 2012, 5:48 PM   #12
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That's not a great idea (buying a Tamron 18-200mm for use with that Sony model).

That's probably one of the least desirable all-in-one lenses you can find. It's cheaper than most similar models for a reason. ;-)

On a lower resolution camera model (i.e., one of the 6MP cameras that were around when the Konica Minolta and Tamron 18-200mm lenses were first introduced), it might have made an OK travel lens, provided you didn't mind the barrel distortion, slow Autofocus in less than optimum lighting, and needing to stop down the aperture some to get around some of the lens softness (especially in the corners).

But, with a higher resolution camera, it's weaknesses are going to be more obvious, since it's just not going to resolve enough line pairs/mm to get good sharpness with today's sensors.

If you really want an all in one type lens solution, look at the Sony or Tamron 18-250mm instead. The 18-250mm has much better optical quality compared to the older 18-200mm design (from Sony, Konica Minolta or Tamron, which shared the same optical design). The newer Sony or Tamron 18-250mm lenses are still not going to be as good as having more than one lens to cover the same focal range. But, the 18-250mm would be better than the 18-200mm lens.

Basically, you'd be better off with any of the other similar lenses compared to the Konica Minolta, Tamron or Sony 18-200mm.

IOW, I'd look at the Tamron or Sony 18-250mm, newer Tamron 18-270mm, or newer Sigma 18-250mm HSM OS lens if you really want an all-in-one lens. Any of those are going to have better image quality compared to the Tamron 18-200mm you're thinking about.

But, for even better image quality, stick with more than one lens to cover the same focal range. For example, go with a 2 lens kit that includes the Sony 18-55mm and 55-200mm lenses with it.

Sure, it can be nice to have the convenience of one lens to cover that much focal range (despite the compromises you'll make in image quality compared to separate lenses to cover the same range). But, I'd at least look at one with better image quality compared to the Tamron 18-200mm (it's not a very good lens choice). It's optical design produced substandard images using it on the 6 Megapixel camera models that were mainstream when that lens type was first introduced (with lots of barrel distortion on it's wider end, lots of corner softness unless you stop down the aperture, high CA); and it's optical deficiencies are going to be even more apparent trying to use it on a higher resolution camera model.
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Old Jan 8, 2012, 7:48 PM   #13
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Yeah. That.
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Old Jan 8, 2012, 9:11 PM   #14
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I'm getting a Tamron 18-200mm lens, wich I'll never take off! And since I'm not shooting in the desert, I assume dust or dirt won't be an issue...
Dust gets in everywhere. I get dust in seal lenses. Sooner or later you will have to clean. But with a lens system, you may find that you might want to try different things, macro or shallow dof.
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Old Jan 9, 2012, 4:48 AM   #15
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Basically, you'd be better off with any of the other similar lenses compared to the Konica Minolta, Tamron or Sony 18-200mm.
Thank you for answering Jim, but you seem to be forgetting the fact that I'm on a very tight budget.

Besides, the Tamron AF 18-200mm f/3,5-6,3 XR Di II LD ASL IF MACRO has won numerous awards. At the current price it's a bargain, absolutely ideal for a freshman in photography and who is also on a budget.

Is the following memory card fast enough for the A35?
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Old Jan 9, 2012, 5:32 AM   #16
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You can get very good photos from almost any lens most of the time. The distiction is what happens the rest of the time. I used to own the Tamron 18-200, albeit with a Konica Minolta nameplate on it. I was quite satisfied with most of my shots with it.









Until I started looking closely. That's when I saw what the objective test results predicted I'd see: significant distortion at the wide end, significant chromatic aberration at both ends, and even at it's best it's not very sharp. This inspired me to try another lens, the Minolta 70-210mm f/4.0 'Beercan' (for $149, a whole lot less than I paid for the 18-200.) There was no comparison. I immediately listed the 18-200 on eBay and built up my collection of good used Minolta lenses, each of which produced better images than the 18-200 ever did.

If you're on a budget, that's no excuse for spending a lot of money on one poor lens, that's a reason to do some shopping around and doing your homework.

Dyxum.com is an excellent source of information about lenses for an A35. If you go there, and on the right side, select the manufacturer of Sony, and set the sort order to review score, you'll find a list of current Sony lenses in order by how highly the members of Dyxum.com thought of them. Third from the bottom of that list is the 18-200. Do the same thing for either Tamron or Minolta, and you'll see similar results.

Good luck with whatever you do.
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Old Jan 9, 2012, 5:35 AM   #17
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I've tried that Transcend card. it's not the slowest card I've ever used but it's not the fastest either. I suggest you stick with either SanDisk Extreme or Lexar Professional.
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Old Jan 9, 2012, 7:36 AM   #18
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You'll probably find that a Sandisk Extreme III Memory Stick Pro-HG Duo card is faster in it. The newest Sony Memory Stick Pro HG Duo cards are also very fast. Just make sure any card you buy is marked as Pro-HG (the HG is the important part, as the cards without HG in their names are very slow in comparison).

I don't know if the Sony would take advantage of newer UHS-1 capable SDHC/SDXC cards or not. But, if you find a good price on the newer SanDisk Extreme Pro SDHC/SDXC UHS-I Memory Cards (marked as 95MB/Second read, 90MB/Second Write), it may be work taking a chance on one of them to see if it's faster than a newer Memory Stick Pro-HG Duo card in that Sony camera.

But, earlier Sony models tested faster with Memory Stick Pro HG Duo Cards compared to Class 10 Sandisk Extreme SDHC Cards (and you'll see the same thing on benchmarks using card readers, with the newer Memory Stick Pro HG Duo cards outperforming Class 10 Sandisk Extreme SDHC Cards by a significant margin).

The faster Memory Stick Pro HG-Duo cards are good for write speeds of around 45MB/Second (even using the Sandisk Extreme III Memory Stick Pro HG Duo cards that are marked at only 30MB/Second), whereas the Sandisk Class 10 Extreme SDHC cards marked as 30MB/Second tend to top out at around 25MB/Second or slower in very fast (not just USB 2.0) card readers. In other words, the newer Memory Stick Pro-HG Duo cards are much faster in card readers and Sony dSLR models (at least with the cards that are not UHS-1 Capable), as they use a newer 8 bit parallel transfer mode that allows faster write speeds compared to SDHC cards.

As for lenses, have you thought about just going with a two lens kit including the A35, 18-55mm and 55-200mm kit lenses? It looks like Jessops has a good deal on that kit right now (529.95 with free delivery):

http://www.jessops.com/online.store/...1552/show.html

That way, you'd have higher quality lenses compared to that Tamron to use for now. Then, if you decided you still wanted an "all in one" lens solution later, just save up until you can afford something better than that Tamron 18-200mm (as it's probably going to be soft trying to use it with a higher resolution sensor), and sell the original lenses on Ebay if you decide you don't need them anymore after buying a better all-in-one lens model (Tamron 18-250mm, Sony 18-250mm, Tamron 18-270mm, Sigma 18-250mm). But, that two lens kit is still going to have better image quality compared to the better all-in-one lens models like that.

Awards, huh? When? Years ago when 6MP cameras were popular? A lot of times you'll see awards from groups of magazines and/or review sites because vendors spend money on advertising with them. ;-)

If you look at tests of it, it was not a very good lens when it was first introduced. On a 6MP Camera model, it was OK with the aperture stopped down some (where Center Sharpness wasn't bad, but corners were still soft as you got further away from the center of the image), with relatively high distortion.

But, as you get into higher resolution sensors (with more pixels packed closer together), you'll start to see softer images at larger sizes, because a lens like that just doesn't have good enough optics to resolve enough line pairs/mm for the higher resolution sensors. Basically, after a certain point, the resolution of the sensor is wasted (where you're not going to get any more detail than you would with a lower resolution camera, because the lens is just not resolving the detail needed, as higher resolution sensors are going to place more demands on the lens quality needed to take advantage of them). If you don't care about larger viewing/print sizes, perhaps it would be OK for convenience purposes for web posting and smaller prints. But, personally, I'd avoid it for use on a higher resolution model like the A35.

There's an old saying.... Buy cheap, buy twice.

IOW, if you're not happy with the image quality from that lens, you'd just end up buying a different lens later anyway. So, it's easier to buy a better lens with acceptable image quality to begin with.
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Old Jan 9, 2012, 7:58 AM   #19
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What about the Tamron 70-300mm?
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Old Jan 9, 2012, 8:24 AM   #20
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It's one of the better budget 70-300mm zoom lenses (if you make sure to get the latest Di LD Macro version of it versus an older design), although it gets softer on it's longer end (but, so do other less expensive 70-300mm lenses). It's a larger lens compared to the Sony 55-200mm (which is designed specifically for cameras with APS-C size sensors), since that Tamron will also work on full frame models (i.e., 35mm film size sensors).
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