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Old Jan 26, 2012, 11:13 AM   #1
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Default In-body stabilization

Hey there all you Alpha system users!

When panning, does I.S. affect the final image in any way?
Is it desirable when only one axis of stablization is fixed?
Or do you just turn it off completely when panning?
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Old Jan 26, 2012, 11:31 AM   #2
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I've seen posts mentioning that it should be turned off, and there is very little published data on how it works with panning (whether or not it knows you're panning and only compensates on one axis).

But, I've always left it turned on when panning and I haven't seen any negative impact from leaving it turned on.

I based my understanding of how it works from an old review of the Konica Minolta 7D over at dpreview.com which said this about it (and note that Sony's in body SSS is based on Minolta's Anti-Shake System, first debuted in the Konica Minola Maxxum 7D):

" ...can also detect a panning movement and only compensate for movement on the opposite axis..."

See the second paragraph in the Anti-Shake section on this page:

http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/konicaminolta7d/

IOW, it's probably trying to compensate for vertical movement when panning (reducing blur from up and down camera movement when panning horizontally), based on what dpreview.com learned from KM when publishing that review. So, I leave my stabilization turned on when panning at slower shutter speeds with Sony models, too.
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Old Jan 26, 2012, 12:49 PM   #3
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You're always a big help...thank you Jimmy!
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Old Jan 26, 2012, 1:12 PM   #4
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Image stabilization (in-lens or in-body) uses accelerometers which sense - not movement, but changes in movement. If you're panning steadily, those accelerometers don't sense any changes in movement, and so the image stabilization doesn't do anything. When you shake a camera, those accelerometers sense the change in movement as the camera stops moving in one direction and starts moving in the opposite direction. That's when the image stabilization kicks in.

There is the potential for image stabilization to compensate for erratic movement when panning, so you should leave it on.
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Old Jan 27, 2012, 1:06 PM   #5
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Hmm, so in that case I can leave IS ON while the camera is on a tripod?
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Old Jan 27, 2012, 1:12 PM   #6
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If it's a sturdy tripod (and many cheap tripods are not, and tend to pick up vibration from cars driving by, etc.), I'd leave stabilization turned off.

Otherwise, the camera may attempt to compensate for movement that isn't actually there. That's the only time I leave Stabilization turned off (when using a camera on a tripod). Otherwise, I leave Stabilization turned on.
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Old Jan 29, 2012, 6:27 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TCav View Post
There is the potential for image stabilization to compensate for erratic movement when panning, so you should leave it on.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marawder View Post
Hmm, so in that case I can leave IS ON while the camera is on a tripod?
If you're panning on a tripod, IS could help keep the panning steady. But usually, when using a tripod, you should turn it off. Sometimes, especially with less than perfect tripods, any vibration can cause the IS to try to compensate for it, and the actrion of the IS mechanism can induce vibration on the tripod, which the IS continues to try to compensate for.
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Last edited by TCav; Jan 30, 2012 at 7:46 AM.
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Old Feb 6, 2012, 8:19 AM   #8
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I've been using my a550 since mid-2010 and have used it on a tripod plenty of times. Sometimes i forget to turn off the SS. If it was still a physical switch, I probably wouldn't but menu-driven...well...I forget. I haven't seen any difference, on or off when i use it on a tripod. Not to say you should leave it on.

Other systems (Nikon vr for example), I have been told of awful results if it's left on. So until they produce an anti-shake system that is smart enough to know when it's on a stable platform, we better turn it off.
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Old Feb 6, 2012, 11:30 AM   #9
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It depends a lot on the camera, the lens, and the tripod.

If the camera (as in, not the lens) is mounted on the tripod, then sensor shift IS in the body will happen directly on the tripod and probably won't cause additional shake, but optical IS in the lens will be out in front of the tripod, so it's more likely to create additional shake that the IS will try to compensate for, thereby causing more shake, creating a feedback loop. Conversely, if the lens is mounted to the tripod then optical IS probably won't cause additional shake, but sensor shift IS might.
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