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Old Jan 25, 2014, 6:28 PM   #1
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Default Lens Repair?

Is it worth having an old lens repaired? I have a Minolta 50mm f1.4 AF with what I would describe as a broken return spring for the iris. Everything else about the lens is quite nice. (other than being broken of course)

Anyone take one apart? Anyone able to put it back together after having it apart? Is there a how-to guide I could follow to try this repair myself? I would like to save it if possible.

Any suggestions?
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Old Jan 26, 2014, 8:30 AM   #2
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You could try:

AF lens repair guides
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Old Jan 26, 2014, 2:51 PM   #3
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Just what I was looking for. Thanks TCav. Worst case is I break a broken lens.

Have you been inside one of these? Are there special tools or materials such as sealants or lubricants that might be required? With the service manual in hand I do not see this being overly difficult.
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Old Jan 26, 2014, 4:36 PM   #4
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Manual is ordered, order confirmed.

Help me here TCav as I am totally lost as to how to prepare. If anyone can give the "lens service 101" it has to be you.

Were it you doing this how would you proceed? In my case I am thinking broken spring. I am guessing it will have to fabricated here by hand?
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Old Jan 26, 2014, 7:49 PM   #5
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It's also possible that the lubricant on the diaphragm blades has melted, causing the blades to stick.

You'll need a good set of jeweler's screwdrivers. That is, not the $5 set you can buy at a drug store for fixing your glasses. I'm takking about the ones that real jewelers use. You may also need an adjustable pin wrench and a good set of hex wrenches. The manual should give you a better list than I can.

I've tried working on some old Minolta MC and MD lenses from my Minolta SRT101 and 202, but I didn't have to put them back together.

When I was a kid, my father and I used to do that kind of thing to my mother's kitchen appliances. Sometimes they worked when we were done, sometimes not, but we always had parts left over. We learned a lot when we took apart my mother's KitchenAid Mixer, but we caught hell when it made funny noises.
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Last edited by TCav; Jan 26, 2014 at 7:54 PM.
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Old Jan 28, 2014, 10:57 AM   #6
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The diaphragm opens and closes smoothly. I can move it full range and do not feel anything to make me think it is more than the spring. Best case, one end has come loose for a simple fix.

From the looks of things the diaphragm is one of the first assemblies I will encounter under the mounting flange. Is it going to be nitrogen filled or something of the like?

I should be good to go for tools fortunately. My concern was going to be the need for some sort of specialized tool only a lens tech might have.

Cool story about you and your father. I had an Uncle Van who worked his entire life just fixing things for people. Born right around 1900 and passed in the early 80's. He had a bad leg so instead of going to war he was the guy that took care of everything people used day to day. I remember playing in his shop as a kid and finding things like tinkers tools he used to fix pots and pans during the rationing of WW II. Anything he could lift and move to a bench he could fix one way or another.

I have not thought of Van in years. Thanks for jogging the memories.
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