Go Back   Steve's Digicams Forums > Digital SLR and Interchangeable Lens Cameras > Sony Alpha dSLR / Konica Minolta dSLR, Sony SLT

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old Mar 13, 2014, 8:30 AM   #11
Senior Member
 
TCav's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Washington, DC, Metro Area, Maryland
Posts: 13,571
Default

The Tamron 90/2.8 is a good choice. The green background worked out well, but could be a little lighter. If it's a card table or pool table, perhaps you could direct more light on it next time. As for the shots with the blue background, there seems to be some dust or particles that are in both shots, that you should get rid of next time.
__________________
  • The lens is the thing.
  • 'Full Frame' is the new 'Medium Format'.
  • "One good test is worth a thousand expert opinions." - Tex Johnston, Boeing 707 test pilot.
TCav is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Mar 13, 2014, 10:42 AM   #12
Senior Member
 
Old Boat Guy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: East Texas
Posts: 362
Default

I wonder if the particles might be left over sizing from when the tent and drapes were packaged? There is a coating of some kind on the tent fabric itself that is slowly coming off after repeated unfolding/folding so it could be that as well. Dust is the enemy of this type of photography.

The Green is a piece felt that I picked up at the fabric store. I also have Red and Black. I can think of a couple of things I could do to stop the Green from absorbing so much light. A light spray with Scotch Guard (or the like) would bring up some reflected light. I have plenty of lights so will experiment today.

I like the Tamron lens. If I remember correctly you were the one who suggested it to me. The focus when working manually is silky smooth and stays put when I take my hand away. Most excellent photographic lens.

It is definitely dust. Looking at the other images I am seeing dust from some Cedar boards I ran through the drum sander last week. Evil dust!

Last edited by Old Boat Guy; Mar 13, 2014 at 10:49 AM.
Old Boat Guy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Mar 13, 2014, 4:10 PM   #13
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Australia, New South Wales central coast
Posts: 2,907
Default

G'day mate

Without taking away from any of the excellent comments above, -if- you want to get into commercial or semi-commercial product photography you will need [if fact must] have enough depth-of-field to cover the product

You will not achieve this with a conventional camera lens - you will need a tilt-n-shift lens, and then discover its best usage

From my [years ago] use of tilt 'n shift equipment, you can triple the amount of DoF via correct use of the lens - and from your first exampes, the DoF is so inadequate that no advertiser will even give your images a second look. The latter set of images are 'just' there with DoF but to my eye it's "only just there" and you have a long way to go

I hope this helps a bit
Phil
__________________
Has Fuji & Lumix superzoom cameras and loves their amazing capabilities
Spends 8-9 months each year travelling Australia
Recent images at http://www.flickr.com/photos/ozzie_traveller/sets/
Ozzie_Traveller is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Mar 13, 2014, 6:24 PM   #14
Senior Member
 
TCav's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Washington, DC, Metro Area, Maryland
Posts: 13,571
Default

Stopping down will increase the DoF, but to do that, you'll need long shutter speeds, supplemental light, or both. There are only a few T/S lenses for the A-Mount, and they are quite expensive.
__________________
  • The lens is the thing.
  • 'Full Frame' is the new 'Medium Format'.
  • "One good test is worth a thousand expert opinions." - Tex Johnston, Boeing 707 test pilot.
TCav is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Mar 14, 2014, 9:15 AM   #15
Senior Member
 
Old Boat Guy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: East Texas
Posts: 362
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ozzie_Traveller View Post
G'day mate

Without taking away from any of the excellent comments above, -if- you want to get into commercial or semi-commercial product photography you will need [if fact must] have enough depth-of-field to cover the product

You will not achieve this with a conventional camera lens - you will need a tilt-n-shift lens, and then discover its best usage

From my [years ago] use of tilt 'n shift equipment, you can triple the amount of DoF via correct use of the lens - and from your first exampes, the DoF is so inadequate that no advertiser will even give your images a second look. The latter set of images are 'just' there with DoF but to my eye it's "only just there" and you have a long way to go

I hope this helps a bit
Phil
DoF is and has been an issue.

The first two shots of the barrel breeches were a bit different. The first was done to show the manufacturer there was an issue. The second shot was to show a friend his custom reamer was not quite as smooth as he thought it might be.

I understand what you are saying about advertisers and would agree with you were it most any other industry. Preliminary images, on a commercial website, of this magazine gizmo were done with a smart phone with few complaints. Everyone knows it can be better but the big kids do not seem to care. One of the larger internet retailers for Air Rifles here in the US pulls a label from one of the boxes and scans it for their web site. High end and custom pieces might go see a photographer but nothing else.

Every comment helps Phil and I thank you for yours.

Quote:
Originally Posted by TCav View Post
Stopping down will increase the DoF, but to do that, you'll need long shutter speeds, supplemental light, or both. There are only a few T/S lenses for the A-Mount, and they are quite expensive.
Stopping down did help. It also required both long shutter speeds and lots of extra lights. Remote shutter release and hold my breath for fear something will move or start to shake. usually both

With some of the finish work as bad as it is I am beginning to think I should back off and stop trying for super high detail shots all together.

Here is an example. The DoF is bad in this image but getting it right would only make this one worse. The stamped indexing lever looks much worse in this image than it does to the eye. The second one at a slight angle looks much better but the rough edges are still there for all to see. (as is the DoF problem I am having)
Attached Images
  
Old Boat Guy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Mar 14, 2014, 6:45 PM   #16
Senior Member
 
TCav's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Washington, DC, Metro Area, Maryland
Posts: 13,571
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Old Boat Guy View Post
... The DoF is bad in this image but getting it right would only make this one worse. The stamped indexing lever looks much worse in this image than it does to the eye. The second one at a slight angle looks much better but the rough edges are still there for all to see. (as is the DoF problem I am having)
If you focus on the front, the back will be out of focus. Backing up a little and shooting the subject at an angle mixed up the focus a little, so the DoF was probably more centered around the subject.
__________________
  • The lens is the thing.
  • 'Full Frame' is the new 'Medium Format'.
  • "One good test is worth a thousand expert opinions." - Tex Johnston, Boeing 707 test pilot.
TCav is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 10:18 PM.